IES Blog

Institute of Education Sciences

Gearing up for the Fall Semester? See How ERIC Can Help!

By Erin Pollard, ERIC Project Officer, NCEE

The ERIC Help Desk frequently receives questions from academic users asking if we have resources to help students and faculty use the Institute of Education Sciences' free online library of education research. In response, ERIC has created several videos that can be embedded in LibGuides (a content management system used by libraries), linked to in syllabi, and posted on course websites. These videos can also be accessed from ERIC’s Multimedia Page.

Our newest videos include:

About ERIC: The About ERIC video is an introduction to our digital library and answers basic questions about who our website is designed for and what types of information you’ll find there. Users can view this video to determine if ERIC is the right resource to use for their research.

Using ERIC to Write a Research Paper: The ERIC Help Desk has received a lot  of requests from students asking how to use ERIC to write a research paper.  This video was specifically created to be a resource that librarians and faculty members could direct students to as a starting point for research projects. For more information on this video, stay tuned for next week’s blog post!

Searching eric.ed.gov: ERIC was redesigned in 2013 using intuitive search technology, as opposed to more traditional searching mechanisms. This video explains how our search engine works and offers tips to help users get the best results.

How ERIC Selects New Sources: Users frequently ask how sources are selected to be indexed in ERIC. This video describes the process laid out in the ERIC Selection Policy and explains how users can recommend new resources for our collection.

IES Public Access Policy: How Grantees and Contractors Meet Requirements by Submitting Work to ERIC: Are you conducting research funded by IES? If so, then you are likely subject to the IES Public Access Policy (learn more about the policy for publications and data).  This video explains how researchers can meet their compliance requirements by submitting their work to ERIC.

Tips for Using the ERIC Online Submission System:  ERIC encourages authors to submit their work through our Online Submission System. Learn what types of materials are eligible to be included and how to prepare publications for submission to ERIC.

Have suggestions for other videos ERIC should make? Email our Help Desk! To learn more about ERIC, sign up for our Newsflash and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

Five Reasons to Visit the What Works Clearinghouse

By Diana McCallum, Education Research Analyst, What Works Clearinghouse

It’s been more than a decade since the first What Works Clearinghouse reports were released and we have a wealth of information and resources that can help educators and leaders make evidence-based decisions about teaching and learning. Since 2005, the WWC has assessed more than 11,500 education studies using rigorous standards and has published hundreds of resources and guides across many content areas. (View the full version of the graphic to the right.) 

The WWC website has already received more than 1.7 million page views this year, but if you haven’t visited whatworks.ed.gov lately, here are five reasons you might want to click over:

1) We are always adding new and updated reviews. Multiple claims about programs that work can be overwhelming and people often lack time to sift through piles of research. That’s where the WWC comes in. We provide an independent, objective assessment of education research. For example, we have intervention reports that provide summaries of all of the existing research on a given program or practice that educators can use to help inform their choices.  In addition, when a new education study grabs headlines, the WWC develops a quick review that provides our take on the evidence presented to let you know whether the study is credible. In 2015, we added 43 publications to WWC and we’re adding more every month this year.

2) We’ve expanded our reach into the Postsecondary area. In late 2012, the WWC expanded its focus to include reviews of studies within the Postsecondary area to capture the emerging research on studies on a range of topics, from the transition to college to those that focus on postsecondary success.  To date, the WWC has reviewed over 200 studies on postsecondary programs and interventions, and this area continues grow rapidly. In fact, several Office of Postsecondary Education grant competitions add competitive priority preference points for applicants that submit studies that meet WWC standards. (Keep an eye out for a blog post on the postsecondary topic coming soon!)

3) You can find what works using our online tool. Wondering how to get started with so many resources at your fingertips? Find What Works lets you do a quick comparison of interventions for different subjects, grades, and student populations. Want to know more about a specific intervention? We’ve produced more than 400 intervention reports to provide you the evidence about a curriculum, program, software product, or other intervention for your classroom before you choose it.  Recently, we’ve added a feature that allows a user to search for interventions that have worked for different populations of students and in different geographic locations. As we mentioned in a recent blog post, the Find What Works tool is undergoing an even bigger transformation this September, so keep visiting!

4) We identify evidence-based practices to use in the classroom. The WWC has produced 19 practice guides that feature practical recommendations and instructional tips to help educators address common challenges. Practice guides (now available for download as ebooks) provide quick, actionable guidance for educators that are supported by evidence and expert knowledge within key areas.  Some of our guides now feature accompanying videos and brief summaries that demonstrate recommended practices and highlight the meaning behind the levels of evidence. The work of practice guides are also actively disseminated during Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Bridge events. For instance, REL Southwest held a webinar on Teaching Math to Young Children, which was based on a WWC practice guide. For more information, read a previously published blog post on practice guides.

5) We compile information by topic. Our “Special Features” pages focus on common themes in education, such as tips for college readiness, information for heading back to school, and guidance for what works in early childhood education. These Special Features provide a starting point to access a variety of WWC resources related to a topic.

In the coming months, we’ll post other blogs that will explore different parts of the WWC and tell you about ongoing improvements. So keep visiting the What Works website or signup to receive emails when we release new reports or resources. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The What Works Clearinghouse is a part of the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance in the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the independent research, evaluation, and statistics arm of the U.S. Department of Education. You can learn more about IES’ other work on its website or follow IES on Twitter and Facebook

 

RCT-YES: Supporting a Culture of Research Use in Education

By Ruth Curran Neild, Delegated Director, IES

The mission of the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), at its core, is to create a culture in which independent, rigorous research and statistics are used to improve education. But sometimes research is seen by practitioners and policymakers as something that is done for them or to them, but not by them. And that’s something we’re hoping to change.

IES is always looking for new ways to involve educators in producing and learning about high-quality, useful research. We believe that if state and school district staff see themselves as full participants in scientific investigation, they will be more likely to make research a part of their routine practice. Simply put, we want to make it easier for educators to learn what works in their context and to contribute to the general knowledge of effective practices in education.    

That’s why we’re so pleased to add the RCT-YESTM software to the IES-funded toolkit of free, user-friendly resources for conducting research. Peter Schochet of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. led the development of the software, as part of a contract with IES held by Decision Information Resources, Inc.

RCT-YES has a straightforward interface that allows the user to specify the analyses for data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) or a quasi-experiment. Definitions and tips in the software help guide the user and accompanying documentation includes a mini-course on RCTs. When the user enters information about the data set and study design, RCT-YES produces a program to run the specified analyses (in either R or Stata) and provide a set of formatted tables.

The target users are those who have a basic knowledge of statistics and research design but do not have advanced training in conducting or analyzing data from impact studies. But we expect that even experienced researchers will like the simplicity and convenience of RCT-YES and benefit from some of its novel features, such as how it reports results.

When used properly, RCT-YES provides all of the statistics needed by the What Works ClearinghouseTM (WWC) to conduct a study review.  This is an important feature because the WWC often needs to contact authors—even experienced ones—to obtain additional statistics to make a determination of study quality.  RCT-YES could help advance the field by increasing the completeness of study reports.

Another unique feature of the software is that it defaults to practices recommended by IES’ National Center for Education Statistics for the protection of personally identifiable information. For example, the program suppresses reporting on small-size subgroups.

While the user sees only the simplicity of the interface, the underlying estimation methods and code required painstaking and sophisticated work.  RCT-YES relies on design-based estimation methods, and the development, articulation, peer review, and publication of this approach in the context of RCT-YES was the first careful step. Design-based methods make fewer assumptions about the statistical model than methods traditionally used in education (such as hierarchical linear modeling), making this approach especially appropriate for software designed with educators in mind.

The software is available for download from the RCT-YES website, where you can also find support videos, documentation, a user guide, and links to other helpful resources. The videos below, which are also hosted on the RCT-YES website, give a quick overview of the software.

There are many other ways that IES fosters a culture of research use in education. For instance, our 10 Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs) have research alliances that work with states and districts to develop research agendas. The RELs also host events to share best practices for putting research into action, such as the year-long series of webinars and training sessions on building, implementing, and effectively using Early Warning Systems to reduce dropping out.

IES also offers grants to states and districts to do quick evaluations of programs and policies that have been implemented in their schools. The low-cost, short-duration evaluations not only help the grantees discover what is working, but can help others who might use the same program or implement a similar policy. (We’ll announce the first round of grant recipients in the coming weeks).

Visit the IES website to learn more about our work. You can also stay on top of news and information from IES by following us on Facebook and Twitter

 

 

 

VIDEO: See How ERIC Selects New Sources

By Erin Pollard, ERIC Project Officer, NCEE

ERIC builds a strong education research collection by continuously seeking out new sources of rigorous content and adding them to the collection. But how does ERIC select publications for the online library?

A new video (embedded below) provides the answer to how ERIC selects new sources, including education-focused journals, grey literature reports, and conference papers. The video was developed to help answer one of the most frequently asked questions by ERIC users and to help publishers and organizations producing materials in the field of education understand what ERIC considers when evaluating potential new sources. Watch this video if you want to learn about the types of resources ERIC will and will not index, the source selection process, and how to recommend a new resource.

Twice a year, in the spring and fall, ERIC reviews journals and producers of conference papers, reports, and books as potential candidates for inclusion in ERIC, using a revised selection policy as a guide when evaluating recommended content. The revised policy was released in January 2016 to clarify the types of materials ERIC is seeking for the collection. ERIC considers resources that are education research focused and include citations, orginal analyses of data, and well-formed arguments. ERIC also considers collection priorities, such as peer- reviewed and full-text materials.

We are continuously working to build a strong education research collection that includes the latest and very best resources in the field. If you are a publisher of high-quality education research, or if you have a favorite journal, or know a source of conference papers or reports not currently in ERIC, please send us your recommendations.

To stay up-to-date on ERIC, follow us on FacebookYouTube, or Twitter and check out the Notes area of the ERIC website at eric.ed.gov