WWC review of this study

The effects of the School Renaissance program on student achievement in reading and mathematics.

Nunnery, J. A., & Ross, S. M. (2007). Research in the Schools, 14(1), 40–59.

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    992
     Students
    , grades
    5-8

Reviewed: July 2017



Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Nunnery, John A.; Ross, Steven M.; Goldfeder, Elizabeth. (2003). The Effect of School Renaissance on TAAS Scores in the McKinney ISD. Center for Research in Educational Policy (CREP).

  • Renaissance Learning, Inc. (2007). Use of Accelerated Reader and Accelerated Math Shown to Increase Student Scores in Texas (Scientific Research: Quasi-experimental series). Wisconsin Rapids, WI: Author.

Reviewed: May 2017

Does not meet WWC standards


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Renaissance Learning, Inc. (2007). Use of Accelerated Reader and Accelerated Math Shown to Increase Student Scores in Texas (Scientific Research: Quasi-experimental series). Wisconsin Rapids, WI: Author.

  • Nunnery, John A.; Ross, Steven M.; Goldfeder, Elizabeth. (2003). The Effect of School Renaissance on TAAS Scores in the McKinney ISD. Center for Research in Educational Policy (CREP).

Reviewed: June 2016



Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

Reviewed: September 2010

At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations
General Mathematics Achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

2001 and 2002 transformed Texas Learning Index scores

Accelerated Math® vs. Business as Usual

Posttest

Grade 5 cohort;
865 students

1.26

1.21

Yes

 
 
7


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 8% English language learners

  • Suburban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Texas
  • Race
    Asian
    3%
    Black
    8%
    Native American
    0%
    White
    70%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    18%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    82%

Setting

The treatment group schools came from one suburban school district in Texas. Comparison schools came from other school districts with similar populations of students in Texas.

Study sample

The analysis sample included 865 students (416 treatment, 449 comparison) from 18 elementary schools (nine treatment and nine comparison). These students were in grade 5 during the 2001–02 school year. Students in the analysis sample remained in the same school and had matched data available for three consecutive years (the 1999–2000 to 2001–02 school years). Characteristics of the student sample varied across the 18 schools. Between 0% and 59% in each school qualified for free or reduced-price lunch. Between 0% and 35% of students in each school were limited English proficient, and the proportion of students who were Caucasian ranged from 25% to 95%.

Intervention Group

In the 2000–01 school year, schools in the treatment group began implementing School Renaissance, a comprehensive school reform model that includes Accelerated Math™. Students in the treatment group experienced two years of the Accelerated Math™ program as their primary mathematics curriculum. Treatment schools may have supplemented with other materials.

Comparison Group

Schools in the comparison condition were from Texas school districts that had not implemented the full School Renaissance package. It is possible that some elements of School Renaissance (e.g., Accelerated Math™) were present in the comparison schools; however, the comparison group curriculum is unknown.

Outcome descriptions

The study used the Texas Learning Index math scores (based on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills); for the grade 5 cohort, program comparisons were based on average transformed scores for grades 4 and 5 from 2001 and 2002. For a more detailed description of this outcome measure, see Appendix A2.

Support for implementation

A Renaissance coach conducted an initial training seminar and provided ongoing assistance to teachers.

Reviewed: August 2010

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards with reservations
Comprehension outcomes—Statistically significant positive effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAC): Reading subtest

Accelerated Reader vs. Business as usual

End of year 2

Grade 8: Cohort 2;
992 students

90.67

88.56

No

--

Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAC): Reading subtest

Accelerated Reader vs. Business as usual

End of year 2

Grade 5: Cohort 2;
891 students

91.53

90.64

No

--

Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAC): Reading subtest

Accelerated Reader vs. Business as usual

End of year 2

Grade 5: Cohort 1;
912 students

88.44

89.45

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 7% English language learners

  • Suburban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Texas
  • Race
    Asian
    3%
    Black
    8%
    Native American
    0%
    White
    71%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    17%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    83%

Setting

The study took place in 18 elementary and 4 middle/junior high schools from nine districts in Texas. All 11 intervention schools were located in a suburban school district.

Study sample

The intervention group consisted of 11 schools that implemented Accelerated Reader™. Two steps were used to identify comparison schools. The first step was taken to narrow the pool of potential comparison schools. In this step, the researchers used data from the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS), which identifies—for each school in Texas (including the 11 treatment schools in this study)—40 demographically similar schools based on the percentage of African-American students, Hispanic students, white students, economically disadvantaged students, limited English proficient students, and student mobility. In the second step, from the group of 40 potential comparison schools identified for each treatment school, the most similar school not using Accelerated Reader™ was selected according to the schools’ base-year accountability rating (low performing, acceptable, recognized, exemplary) and base-year percentage of economically disadvantaged students. One of the selected comparison schools declined to participate, and another two did not have appropriate grade-level scores for use in the study. These three comparison schools were replaced from the pool of similar schools. The analytic sample consisted of students in grades 5 and 8 who had three consecutive years of data between school years 1998/99 and 2001/02 (cohort 1 students had data from the 1998/99 through 2000/01 school years, and cohort 2 students had data from the 1999/2000 through 2001/02 school years). The cohort 1 grade 5 analysis sample included 442 intervention students from nine schools who received Accelerated Reader™ in the 1999/2000 and 2000/01 school years and 470 nonparticipants from nine matched elementary schools. The cohort 2 grade 5 analysis sample consisted of 437 students from nine schools who received Accelerated Reader™ in the 1999/2000, 2000/01, and 2001/02 school years and 454 nonparticipants from nine matched elementary schools. The cohort 2 grade 8 analysis sample consisted of 482 students in two schools who received Accelerated Reader™ in the 1999/2000, 2000/01, and 2001/02 school years and 510 nonparticipants from two matched middle/junior high schools. Outcomes were measured at the end of the second year of intervention implementation for cohort 1 and at the end of the third year of intervention implementation for cohort 2.

Intervention Group

According to study authors, Accelerated Reader™ was the primary reading curriculum in intervention schools. The study did not provide details on how the intervention was implemented.

Comparison Group

The comparison schools did not implement Accelerated Reader™ during the school years under study. No information is available on the reading curricula used in these schools.

Outcome descriptions

For both pre- and posttests, the authors used the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS), Reading subtest. For a more detailed description of this outcome measure, see Appendix A2.2.

Support for implementation

No information on staff or teacher training was provided in the study.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Nunnery, John A.; Ross, Steven M.; Goldfeder, Elizabeth. (2003). The Effect of School Renaissance on TAAS Scores in the McKinney ISD. Center for Research in Educational Policy (CREP).

Reviewed: September 2008

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards with reservations
General Mathematics Achievement outcomes—Indeterminate effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

2001 and 2002 transformed Texas Learning Index scores

Accelerated Math® vs. Business as Usual

2000-2001

Grade 8 Cohort;
992 students

1.21

1.16

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 4% English language learners

  • Suburban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Texas
  • Race
    Asian
    3%
    Black
    7%
    White
    70%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    19%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    81%

Setting

The treatment group schools came from one suburban school district in Texas. Comparison schools came from other school districts in Texas with similar populations of students.

Study sample

The analysis sample included 992 students (482 treatment, 510 comparison) in the 2001/02 grade 8 cohort from four middle schools (two treatment and two comparison). Of the student sample, 21% qualified for free or reduced-price lunch (21% treatment, 20% comparison), 4% were limited English proficient (4% treatment, 4% comparison), 7% African-American (9% treatment, 6% comparison), 3% Asian (2% treatment, 3% comparison), 19% Hispanic (19% treatment, 20% comparison), 0% Native American (0% treatment, 0% comparison), and 70% were White (69% treatment, 71% comparison). Information about attrition was provided only at the level of assignment. Of the 11 elementary and middle schools originally selected as comparison schools, three schools did not provide appropriate grade-level test score data and were replaced (it is unknown whether any of these replaced schools were middle schools). Students in the analysis sample remained in the same school and had matched data available for three consecutive years (1999/2000–2001/02).

Intervention Group

In 2000/01, schools in the treatment group implemented School Renaissance, a comprehensive school reform model that includes Accelerated Math. Accelerated Math is a progress-monitoring software program that tracks students’ daily activities, provides immediate feedback to students and teachers, alerts teachers to students struggling with certain assignments, and monitors achievement. Teachers can use the program with their existing math curriculum. Students in the treatment group experienced two years of the Accelerated Math program.

Comparison Group

Schools in the comparison condition were from Texas school districts that had not implemented the full School Renaissance package. However, it is still possible that some elements of Accelerated Math were present in the comparison schools.

Outcome descriptions

The study used the Texas Learning Index (TLI) math scores (based on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills); for the grade 8 cohort, program comparisons were based on average transformed scores for grades 7 and 8 from 2001 and 2002. The TLI has a common interpretation across grades: a score of 70 or above indicates performance at or above grade-level expectations. A student receiving the same score at consecutive grade levels made one year of academic progress. For a more detailed description of these outcome measures, see Appendix A2.

Support for implementation

A Renaissance coach conducts an initial training seminar and provides ongoing assistance to teachers.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Nunnery, John A.; Ross, Steven M.; Goldfeder, Elizabeth. (2003). The Effect of School Renaissance on TAAS Scores in the McKinney ISD. Center for Research in Educational Policy (CREP).

 

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