WWC review of this study

Evaluating the Lions-Quest Skills for Adolescence drug education program: Second-year behavior outcomes.

Eisen, M., Zellman, G. L., & Murray, D. M. (2003). Addictive Behaviors, 28, 883–897.

  • Randomized controlled trial
     examining 
    5,462
     Students
    , grades
    6-8

Reviewed: September 2006

At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Behavior outcomes—Indeterminate effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Binge drinking - last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8: baseline binge drinkers;
5,218 students

73.00

63.00

Yes

 
 
11

Marijuana use - last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

88.68

86.21

Yes

 
 
6

Marijuana use - lifetime

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

72.76

69.50

Yes

 
 
4

Alcohol use: Last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

77.15

76.82

No

--

Other illicit substances use - last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

93.11

93.02

No

--

Binge drinking - last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8: baseline nonbinge drinkers;
244 students

88.00

88.00

No

--

Alcohol use: Lifetime

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

33.03

33.67

No

--

Cigarettes smoking - lifetime

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

72.00

72.50

No

--

Other illicit substances use - lifetime

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

81.05

81.56

No

--

Cigarettes smoking - last 30 days

Lions Quest -- Skills for Adolescence vs. business as usual

Posttest

Grade 8;
5,462 students

87.53

88.52

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 52%
    Male: 48%

  • Urban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
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    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    California, District of Columbia, Maryland, Michigan
  • Race
    Asian
    7%
    Black
    18%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    34%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    66%

Setting

The study took place in 34 middle schools from four school districts located in three large metropolitan areas (Los Angeles–Long Beach, California; Detroit–Wayne County, Michigan; and Washington, DC–Baltimore, Maryland).

Study sample

Participants of this study included 7,426 students who were followed from sixth through eighth grade. Female students comprised 52% of the sample. The distribution of minority students was as follows: 34% Hispanic, 18% African-American, and 7% Asian-American.

Intervention Group

A one-semester, 40-session Skills for Adolescence curriculum was implemented in English or Spanish in the intervention schools. Each session lasted 35–45 minutes. No information was provided on implementation fidelity other than that teachers were required to schedule and teach 8 of the 40 sessions that included drug prevention components, knowing that they may be observed by project staff and consenting to this observation.1

Comparison Group

The comparison group “received their usual drug education programming” and were left to the discretion of the teachers at each school. A range of drug prevention programs and related practices were implemented in the comparison schools, including school assemblies, teacher-devised classroom curricula, and exposure to the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program. The comparison schools were promised implementation of Skills for Adolescence once the final follow-up data were collected.

Outcome descriptions

Outcome measures examined student self-reported cigarette smoking and alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drug use prevalence rates. (See Appendix A2 for more detailed descriptions of outcome measures.)

Support for implementation

The teachers attended a three-day workshop conducted by Quest International certified trainers and received teacher manuals and workbooks for each of their students.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Eisen, M., Zellman, G. L., Massett, H. A., & Murray, D. M. (2002). Evaluating the Lions-Quest Skills for Adolescence drug education program: First-year behavior outcomes. Addictive Behaviors, 27, 619-632.

  • Eisen, M. (2002). Intermediate outcomes from a life skills education program with a media literacy component. In Crano, W. D., & Burgoon, M. (Eds.) Mass media and drug prevention: Classic and contemporary theories and research. (pp. 187–214). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

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