WWC review of this study

Improving High Schools through STEM Early College Strategies: The Impact of the STEM Early College Expansion Partnership (SECEP) [Michigan]

Edmunds, Julie A.; Dudley, William N.; Hutchins, Bryan C.; Arshavsky, Nina; Lewis, Karla (2019). Grantee Submission. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED604217

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    51,620
     Students
    , grades
    9-12

Reviewed: January 2022

At least one finding shows promising evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations
Progressing in College outcomes—Statistically significant positive effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Earned any college credit

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. 11th and 12th grade students only. ;
26,093 students

29.76

17.48

Yes

 
 
16
 

Average number of college credits earned

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. 11th and 12th grade students only.;
26,093 students

3.53

1.75

Yes

 
 
11
 
Show Supplemental Findings

Average number of college credits earned

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. Economically disadvantaged 11th and 12th grade students.;
11,940 students

2.35

0.95

Yes

 
 
12

Percentage enrolled in any college course

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. 11th grade students.;
19,138 students

35.45

28.70

No

--

Percentage enrolled in any college course

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. 12th grade students.;
18,521 students

48.98

41.88

No

--

Average number of college credits earned

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. Black, Native American, & Hispanic or Latino 11th and 12th grade students. ;
8,221 students

1.31

0.78

No

--
Staying in Secondary School outcomes—Indeterminate effect found for the domain
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Percentage of students dropping out of school (annual)

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. ;
51,620 students

1.63

1.84

No

--
Show Supplemental Findings

Percentage of students dropping out of school (annual)

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. Economically disadvantaged. ;
24,780 students

3.54

2.66

No

--

Percentage of students dropping out of school (annual)

STEM Early College Expansion Project (SECEP) vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Michigan only. Black, Native American, & Hispanic or Latino.;
16,084 students

2.41

2.96

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.

    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Michigan
  • Race
    Other or unknown
    100%

Setting

The study took place in four intermediate school districts in Michigan.

Study sample

The study does not provide demographic information on the student sample.

Intervention Group

The STEM Early College Expansion Partnership (SECEP) is designed to increase the number of students who graduate from high school and who are prepared for enrollment and success in STEM-focused postsecondary education. SECEP’s goal was to redesign high schools by enhancing STEM curriculum and instruction in schools while also expanding access to college courses for students. The project intended to accomplish this by supporting the implementation of the STEM Early College High School Model in comprehensive high schools. Schools were expected to implement four core components: (1) a STEM college-focused academic program, (2) student support, (3) high school-college collaboration, and (4) a culture of continuous improvement. To support these school-level changes, the intervention included coaching and technical assistance to districts, workshops and conferences, a community of practice, school-based SECEP coaching, district-level teams, and district-college collaboration.

Comparison Group

Schools in the comparison condition implemented business-as-usual. Teachers likely implemented their typical STEM curricula and received business-as-usual professional development. Students were likely exposed to instruction and support services as they had been in the past.

Support for implementation

A set of implementation support services were provided, including leadership coaching to districts, conferences and workshops, a community of practice, school-based coaching, district-level teams, and a district-college collaboration.

 

Your export should download shortly as a zip archive.

This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

Connect With the WWC

loading
back to top