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Repeated Reading
Students with a Specific Learning Disability

Repeated reading was found to have potentially positive effects on reading comprehension and no discernible effects on alphabetics, reading fluency, and general reading achievement for students with learning disabilities.

Repeated reading is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. Repeated reading can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During repeated reading, a student sits in a quiet location with a teacher and reads a passage aloud at least three times. Typically, the teacher selects a passage of about 50 to 200 words in length. If the student misreads a word or hesitates for longer than 5 seconds, the teacher reads the word aloud, and the student repeats the word correctly. If the student requests help with a word, the teacher reads the word aloud or provides the definition. The student rereads the passage until he or she achieves a satisfactory fluency level.

Findings

3
studies that met standards out of
15
eligible studies reviewed
Outcome Domain Effectiveness Rating Grades Improvement Index
Alphabetics No discernible effects 9-12 --
Comprehension Potentially positive effects 5-12
 
 
7
Reading achievement No discernible effects 9-12 --
Reading fluency No discernible effects 9-12 --

Last Updated: May 2014

Race

Black
62%
White
37%

Ethnicity

Hispanic
0%
Not Hispanic
100%

Gender

Male: 71%
Female: 28%

English Learners

English Learners icon
6%

Delivery Method

whole class icon
Individual
Small Group

Urbanicity

Rural


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