About the WWC iconAbout

WWC reviews take place within specialized review teams. Each review team has a content expert, methodological expert, and review staff.

Click on the topics below for information about key staff for each team.

Adolescent Literacy

Andrei Streke, Ph.D.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2014 - present

Dr. Andrei Streke, a researcher at Mathematica, specializes in meta-analysis and systematic reviews. He has been involved in many aspects of the WWC since 2004 and was a member of the technical review team that developed the first set of standards. He has also served as the deputy methodologist for four WWC topic area review teams, including Beginning Reading and Adolescent Literacy. Dr. Streke has engaged in a number of systematic review efforts in addition to his work on the WWC. Currently, he serves as the coordinator for assessment of systematic review products developed by the Regional Educational Laboratories. Dr. Streke also contributed to pioneering meta-analyses of education drug prevention programs. He has also participated in large-scale impact evaluations, as well as the evaluation of an intervention for struggling readers in middle and high school. He supported analyses for the McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program, helped evaluate the rigor of professional development offered to elementary school reading teachers in Florida, and supported research teams in estimating program impacts. In addition, Dr. Streke has reviewed proposals, protocols, and final reports concerning systematic reviews of key education policy and practice questions for the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

Allan Porowski, M.P.A.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2014 - present

Mr. Allan Porowski is a fellow at ICF International. Mr. Porowski has been working with the WWC since 2003. In this capacity, he served as project coordinator of the Dropout Prevention review and has worked on other reviews and practice guides on a range of topics. Mr. Porowski has led the development of evidence frameworks and standards for two projects, both for the Texas Education Agency: he served as principal investigator for both a study of Best Practices in Dropout Prevention and the Texas Best Practices Clearinghouse. Mr. Porowski has wide-ranging practical experience in research and evaluation. He currently serves as the School Completion and Engagement Research Alliance coordinator for the Regional Educational Laboratory–Mid-Atlantic. In this position, he leads efforts to help local education agencies and state education agencies in the mid-Atlantic region use data-driven decision making on initiatives related to dropout, graduation, and college and career readiness. He also serves as principal investigator on an RCT to assess the impact of the Accelerating Connections to Employment program, which provides integrated basic skills and vocational education to low-skilled workers in community colleges. From 2002–2010, Mr. Porowski served as technical director for the national evaluation of Communities in Schools (CIS), an initiative to connect community resources to students in need.

Timothy Shanahan, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2008 - present

Dr. Timothy Shanahan is distinguished professor emeritus of Urban Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he directed the Center for Literacy. The former director of reading for the Chicago Public Schools, Dr. Shanahan has written or edited six books (including Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Literacy Research) and more than 100 articles and research studies. Dr. Shanahan’s research focuses on the relationship of reading and writing, school improvement, the assessment of reading ability, and family literacy. He has served as president of the International Reading Association and is a former first-grade teacher. Dr. Shanahan has received a number of awards for his contributions to education research, including the Albert J. Harris Award for outstanding research on reading disability and the Milton D. Jacobson Readability Research Award. He was inducted into Illinois Reading Council Hall of Fame in 2002. From 1998 to 2000, Dr. Shanahan served on the White House Assembly on Reading and the National Reading Panel, a group convened by the National Institute of Child Health and Development at the request of Congress to evaluate research on successful methods of teaching reading. In 2006, he was appointed by President George W. Bush to serve on the Advisory Board of the National Institute for Literacy. Dr. Shanahan was inducted to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2007.

The team conducts reviews using the Adolescent Literacy Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Beginning Reading

Andrei Streke, Ph.D.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2014 - present

Dr. Andrei Streke, a researcher at Mathematica, specializes in meta-analysis and systematic reviews. He has been involved in many aspects of the WWC since 2004 and was a member of the technical review team that developed the first set of standards. He has also served as the deputy methodologist for four WWC topic area review teams, including Beginning Reading and Adolescent Literacy. Dr. Streke has engaged in a number of systematic review efforts in addition to his work on the WWC. Currently, he serves as the coordinator for assessment of systematic review products developed by the Regional Educational Laboratories. Dr. Streke also contributed to pioneering meta-analyses of education drug prevention programs. He has also participated in large-scale impact evaluations, as well as the evaluation of an intervention for struggling readers in middle and high school. He supported analyses for the McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program, helped evaluate the rigor of professional development offered to elementary school reading teachers in Florida, and supported research teams in estimating program impacts. In addition, Dr. Streke has reviewed proposals, protocols, and final reports concerning systematic reviews of key education policy and practice questions for the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

Allan Porowski, M.P.A.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2014 - present

Mr. Allan Porowski is a fellow at ICF International. Mr. Porowski has been working with the WWC since 2003. In this capacity, he served as project coordinator of the Dropout Prevention review and has worked on other reviews and practice guides on a range of topics. Mr. Porowski has led the development of evidence frameworks and standards for two projects, both for the Texas Education Agency: he served as principal investigator for both a study of Best Practices in Dropout Prevention and the Texas Best Practices Clearinghouse. Mr. Porowski has wide-ranging practical experience in research and evaluation. He currently serves as the School Completion and Engagement Research Alliance coordinator for the Regional Educational Laboratory–Mid-Atlantic. In this position, he leads efforts to help local education agencies and state education agencies in the mid-Atlantic region use data-driven decision making on initiatives related to dropout, graduation, and college and career readiness. He also serves as principal investigator on an RCT to assess the impact of the Accelerating Connections to Employment program, which provides integrated basic skills and vocational education to low-skilled workers in community colleges. From 2002–2010, Mr. Porowski served as technical director for the national evaluation of Communities in Schools (CIS), an initiative to connect community resources to students in need.

Timothy Shanahan, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2005 - present

Dr. Timothy Shanahan is distinguished professor emeritus of Urban Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he directed the Center for Literacy. The former director of reading for the Chicago Public Schools, Dr. Shanahan has written or edited six books (including Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Literacy Research) and more than 100 articles and research studies. Dr. Shanahan’s research focuses on the relationship of reading and writing, school improvement, the assessment of reading ability, and family literacy. He has served as president of the International Reading Association and is a former first-grade teacher. Dr. Shanahan has received a number of awards for his contributions to education research, including the Albert J. Harris Award for outstanding research on reading disability and the Milton D. Jacobson Readability Research Award. He was inducted into Illinois Reading Council Hall of Fame in 2002. From 1998 to 2000, Dr. Shanahan served on the White House Assembly on Reading and the National Reading Panel, a group convened by the National Institute of Child Health and Development at the request of Congress to evaluate research on successful methods of teaching reading. In 2006, he was appointed by President George W. Bush to serve on the Advisory Board of the National Institute for Literacy. Dr. Shanahan was inducted to the Reading Hall of Fame in 2007.

The team conducts reviews using the Beginning Reading Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Character Education

David Osher, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2005 - 2007
Methodological Lead, 2005 - 2007

The team conducted reviews using the Character Education Interventions Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently inactive and not conducting reviews.

Charter Schools

Kevin Booker, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2016 - present

Dr. Kevin Booker, a senior researcher at Mathematica, has 15 years of experience evaluating the impacts of charter schools on student achievement and other outcomes. He has been involved in many aspects of the WWC since 2007, working on reviews and practice guides on a range of topics, including Beginning Reading and Middle School Math. Dr. Booker led the analysis of the impact of KIPP high schools on student achievement, designing and implementing a rigorous quasi-experimental comparison group design. Dr. Booker also led Mathematica’s work examining impacts of charter high schools in Chicago, one of the first studies to include postsecondary outcomes. Dr. Booker has led several other analyses of the impacts of charter schools, including the first statewide analysis of Texas charter school impacts on student achievement. Dr. Booker has served as project director for several large impact evaluations, including the Teacher Incentive Fund evaluation of New Leaders, which measured impacts on student achievement for over 150 charter schools in 25 states. He also led the analysis team on a multi-state study of charter school effectiveness for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, working with states and school districts to collect and analyze student achievement and college attendance data. In addition, Dr. Booker has reviewed proposals, technical assistance documents, and final reports as a peer reviewer for the Regional Educational Laboratories.

Brian Gill, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. Brian Gill, a senior fellow at Mathematica and the director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Educational Laboratory, studies a range of topics in K–12 education policy, including charter schools, educator effectiveness, and the implementation and impacts of high-stakes testing and other accountability regimes. Dr. Gill is one of the nation’s leading experts on the effects of charter schools. He served as principal investigator for the first rigorous, nationwide examination of the effectiveness of nonprofit charter-school management organizations. He was also principal investigator on the first nationwide evaluation of the effects of KIPP charter schools. Dr. Gill co-directed the first study of the effects of charter high schools on graduation, college enrollment, and earnings in adulthood, and the first nationwide study of the operations of online charter schools. He is now leading a pioneering study of the impact of charter schools on civic participation. Dr. Gill was lead author of Rhetoric vs. Reality: What We Know and What We Need to Know About Vouchers and Charter Schools, and has published papers on charter-school performance in various peer-reviewed journals.

The team conducts reviews using the Charter Schools Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Children and Students With an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Martha Bleeker, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2016 - present

Dr. Martha Bleeker is a senior survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research and leads the development of review products on the WWC. She served as deputy for the Children Identified With or At Risk for an Emotional Disturbance topic area from its inception in 2009 until 2014, and now serves as the Lead Methodologist for all Special Education topic areas. She has also led the Single-Case Design (SCD) training and certification efforts since 2014. While at Mathematica, Dr. Bleeker has designed and conducted several impact evaluations of school-based programs using both experimental and quasi-experimental methods. For example, she has served as the deputy project director and survey director on Mathematica’s rigorous evaluations of the Playworks program and the Harlem Children's Zone-Healthy Harlem initiative.

Glen Dunlap, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2009 - present

Dr. Glen Dunlap is a research professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, within the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities. He specializes in autism, positive behavior support, early childhood intervention, and family support. Since 2009, he has been a member of the review team leadership for the Children and Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder topic area. Dr. Dunlap has worked with individuals with disabilities for more than 40 years as a teacher, administrator, researcher, and university faculty member. He has directed numerous research and training projects and has been awarded dozens of federal and state grants to pursue this work. He has authored or co-authored more than 175 articles and book chapters, including "Applying Positive Behavior Support and Functional Behavioral Assessments in Schools," "A Demonstration of Behavioral Support for Young Children with Autism" (both in the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions), and "Providing Individual Supports to Young Children with Autism and Their Families" (in Infants and Young Children). He has co-authored and co-edited 10 books, and served on 15 editorial boards. Dr. Dunlap was a founding editor for the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions and was the editor of Topics in Early Childhood Education for 10 years. He was an expert panelist on the National Autism Center’s National Standards Project, a comprehensive analysis of evidence-based treatments for autism spectrum disorders.

Phillip S. Strain, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2009 - present

Dr. Phillip S. Strain is a professor of Educational Psychology and director of the Positive Early Learning Experiences Center at the University of Colorado at Denver. Since 2009, he has been a member of the review team leadership for the Children and Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder topic area. Early in his career, Dr. Strain developed the influential LEAP Model of inclusive services for young children with autism, which has since been incorporated into schools in 21 states, Italy, Brazil, and Ireland. During his 35-year career, Dr. Strain has published over 300 scientific papers including "Evidence-Based Practices for Young Children with Autism: Contributions for Single-Subject Design Research" (in Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities) and "Problem Behavior Interventions for Young Children with Autism: A Research Synthesis" (in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders). He has also conducted several 25-year longitudinal studies on the impact of early intervention, receiving numerous honors and awards for his work. He was an expert panelist on the National Autism Center’s National Standards Project, a comprehensive analysis of evidence-based treatments for autism spectrum disorders.

The team conducts reviews using the Children and Students With an Autism Spectrum Disorder Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Children and Students With Intellectual Disability

Martha Bleeker, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2016 - present

Dr. Martha Bleeker is a senior survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research and leads the development of review products on the WWC. She served as deputy for the Children Identified With or At Risk for an Emotional Disturbance topic area from its inception in 2009 until 2014, and now serves as the Lead Methodologist for all Special Education topic areas. She has also led the Single-Case Design (SCD) training and certification efforts since 2014. While at Mathematica, Dr. Bleeker has designed and conducted several impact evaluations of school-based programs using both experimental and quasi-experimental methods. For example, she has served as the deputy project director and survey director on Mathematica’s rigorous evaluations of the Playworks program and the Harlem Children's Zone-Healthy Harlem initiative.

Michael Wehmeyer, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2010 - present

Dr. Michael L. Wehmeyer is the Ross and Marianna Beach Distinguished Professor in Special Education and Chairperson of the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas. He is also Director and Senior Scientist at the Beach Center on Disability within the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies. Since 2010, he has been a member of the review team leadership for the Children and Students with Intellectual Disability topic area. Dr. Wehmeyer has directed numerous research projects totaling in excess of $35 million and specializes in research related to the education and support of youth and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. His research includes work related to self-determination, access to the general curriculum, transition to adulthood, and technology use by people with disabilities. He has authored or co-authored more than 400 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and has authored, co-authored, or edited 42 books on disability and education related issues, including the widely used textbook Exceptional Lives: Special Education in Today’s School. Additionally, Dr. Wehmeyer is a co-author of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) Supports Intensity Scale and the 2010 AAIDD Intellectual Disability Terminology, Classification, and Systems of Supports Manual. He has held leadership or fellow positions in many organizations, including being a Fellow and Past-President of AAIDD; the Council for Exceptional Children’s Divisions on Career Development and Transition (DCDT) and Autism and Developmental Disabilities (DADD); is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Division (Div. 33); and a Fellow of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD). Dr. Wehmeyer is also the former Editor-in-Chief of the journal Remedial and Special Education and is a founding co-editor of the AAIDD journal Inclusion.

The team conducts reviews using the Children and Students with Intellectual Disability Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Children Identified With or at Risk for an Emotional Disturbance

Martha Bleeker, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2016 - present

Dr. Martha Bleeker is a senior survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research and leads the development of review products on the WWC. She served as deputy for the Children Identified With or At Risk for an Emotional Disturbance topic area from its inception in 2009 until 2014, and now serves as the Lead Methodologist for all Special Education topic areas. She has also led the Single-Case Design (SCD) training and certification efforts since 2014. While at Mathematica, Dr. Bleeker has designed and conducted several impact evaluations of school-based programs using both experimental and quasi-experimental methods. For example, she has served as the deputy project director and survey director on Mathematica’s rigorous evaluations of the Playworks program and the Harlem Children's Zone-Healthy Harlem initiative.

Robert Horner, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2010 - present

Dr. Robert Horner is the Alumni-Knight Professor of Special Education in the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences of the University of Oregon. Currently, he is the director of the Educational Community Supports (ECS), a research unit within the University of Oregon’s College of Education that focuses on the development and implementation of practices for individuals with disabilities. He also co-directs the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Program’s (OSEP) Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports and the OSEP Research and Demonstration Center on School-Wide Behavior Support. Dr. Horner served on the committee that drafted the WWC single-case design pilot standards and was recently a faculty member of a single-case design training institute for researchers, sponsored by The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER). He has published over 150 professional papers and six texts and has directed over $20 million in federal grants. Dr. Horner is also the past co-editor of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, past editor of the Journal of the Association for the Severely Handicapped, and past associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the American Journal on Mental Retardation.

The team conducts reviews using the Children Identified With or at Risk for an Emotional Disturbance Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Dropout Prevention

Mark Dynarski, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2014 - 2016
Content Expert, 2014 - 2016
Content Expert, 2008 - 2010

The team conducted reviews using the Dropout Prevention Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently inactive and not conducting reviews.

Early Childhood Education

Laurie Bozzi, Ph.D.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2013 - present

Dr. Laurie Bozzi is an associate at Abt Associates. She has worked on many projects conducting systematic reviews and research on early childhood and literacy. She has been the task lead for diverse systematic reviews, including those conducted for the National Evaluation of Investing in Innovation (i3) Program, the National Science Foundation Discovery Research K–12 Network, and the U.S. Department of Education’s Mathematics and Sciences Partnership program. She is a certified reviewer for the WWC and has conducted many systematic reviews for WWC practice guides and intervention reports. Dr. Bozzi was an early childhood classroom teacher for 7 years. She has developed and provided training to data collectors on early childhood assessments and classroom observations, and she has conducted numerous analyses on various projects, including the Reading First Impact Study, a study of child care subsidy use, and an evaluation of a reading curriculum in preschools and prekindergarten classrooms.

Anne Wolf, Ph.D.
Co-Methodological Lead, 2013 - present

Dr. Anne Wolf is an associate with Abt Associates. Currently, she provides evaluation technical assistance to local evaluators of the i3 program to implement research that meets WWC design standards (with or without reservations). She has more than 15 years of experience designing, conducting, and managing evaluations of elementary and early childhood education programs, using a range of study designs and rigorous analytic methods. She was project director for the evaluation of the District of Columbia’s Reading First initiative, and has directed the effectiveness evaluation of an intervention aimed at accelerating vocabulary development in kindergarten. Dr. Wolf has also contributed to the analysis and reporting of the Massachusetts Universal Pre-Kindergarten Evaluation, as well as the evaluation of a reading curriculum in preschools and prekindergarten classrooms in Chicago. In addition, as project director, she was responsible for leading a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services-funded forum of research and policy experts on the state of emerging evidence from federal investments in school readiness research.

Michael López, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2013 - present

Dr. Michael L. López is a principal associate at Abt Associates and oversees its early childhood work. He is a national expert with over 20 years of experience conducting applied early childhood research, with a particular emphasis on low-income or culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Dr. López currently is the co-principal investigator for the newly-funded National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families, which is conducting and disseminating research to help inform how programs and policies can better support Hispanic children and families. Previously, he was the executive director for the National Center for Latino Child & Family Research, contributing to a wide range of projects that focused on young children, including the evaluation of the Los Angeles Universal Preschool initiative. In this capacity, Dr. López also served as co-author on a study examining the psychometric characteristics of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) used to assess teacher–child interactions within preschool classrooms serving dual language learners. He also worked in the Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation for the Administration of Children and Families for more than 14 years overseeing large, national evaluations, including the National Head Start Impact Study, the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey, and the national evaluation of the Comprehensive Child Development Programs, among others. Dr. López has published on issues related to young children’s school readiness, including their social, emotional, and behavioral health, as well as issues related to assessing bilingual preschoolers and conducting classroom observations of dual language learners.

The team conducts reviews using the Early Childhood Education Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities

Joshua Furgeson, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2014 - 2016

Donna Spiker, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2008 - 2016

The team conducted reviews using the Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently inactive and not conducting reviews.

English Language Learners

Russell Gersten, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2005 - 2016
Methodological Lead, 2005 - 2016
Content Expert, 2005 - 2016

The team conducted reviews using the English Language Learners Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently inactive and not conducting reviews.

Interventions for Students in Developmental Education

Jeffrey Valentine, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present

Dr. Valentine is a Professor in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville. As an internationally-known expert, Dr. Valentine has written more than three dozen works that use, explain, or seek to improve the methods of systematic reviewing and meta-analysis. He co-edited (with Harris Cooper and Larry Hedges) the Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (Second Edition), is an Associate Editor for the peer-reviewed journal Research Synthesis Methods, is a Statistical Editor for the Developmental, Psychosocial, and Learning Problems Group for the Cochrane Collaboration, and is the Co-chair for the Training Group for the Campbell Collaboration. His research has been published in Psychological Methods, Psychological Bulletin, Review of Educational Research, Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, and Education Evaluation and Public Policy Analysis.

Sandra Jo Wilson, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present
Co-Principal Investigator, 2012 - present

Sandra Jo Wilson is the Associate Director of the Peabody Research Institute and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Wilson also serves as the Editor for the Education Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has extensive experience in all aspects of systematic review and meta-analysis, and has authored numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses on education-related topics. Her professional interests are in research synthesis and meta-analysis, program evaluation, research methodology, and the effectiveness of educational and social interventions. Her current research concentrates on risk factors associated with school failure, the effectiveness of preschool programs for improving school readiness in young children, understanding the sources of variability in treatment effects, and the prevention of school dropout.

Emily Tanner-Smith, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor, 2012 - present

Dr. Emily Tanner-Smith is a Research Assistant Professor at the Peabody Research Institute and the Department of Human & Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Tanner-Smith also serves as the Associate Editor for the Methods Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has (co)authored several systematic reviews and meta-analyses on topics related to behavioral and social interventions. Her research broadly focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of prevention and treatment programs aimed at improving the educational, health, and social well-being of children and youth, with particular emphasis on adolescent substance abuse. Her current research focuses on the effectiveness of substance use intervention and treatment programs for youth, and the effect of school surveillance and school security mechanisms on students’ academic and behavioral outcomes.

Will Doyle, Ph.D.
Postsecondary Content Expert, 2013 - present

Will Doyle is an Associate Professor of higher education in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. His research includes evaluating the impact of higher education policy, the antecedents and outcomes of higher education policy at the state and federal levels, and the study of political behavior as it affects higher education. Before joining the faculty at Vanderbilt, he was Senior Policy Analyst at the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. He serves as an Associate Editor of Research in Higher Education and is on the editorial board of Journal of Higher Education and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. His work has appeared in outlets such as Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Teachers College Record, and Economic of Education Review. During 2004–13, he was an Associate Editor of Change magazine, where he wrote the “Playing the Numbers” column, which explained quantitative research to a broader policy and practitioner audience.

The team conducts reviews using the Developmental Education Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Postsecondary Education

Jeffrey Valentine, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present

Dr. Valentine is a Professor in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville. As an internationally-known expert, Dr. Valentine has written more than three dozen works that use, explain, or seek to improve the methods of systematic reviewing and meta-analysis. He co-edited (with Harris Cooper and Larry Hedges) the Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (Second Edition), is an Associate Editor for the peer-reviewed journal Research Synthesis Methods, is a Statistical Editor for the Developmental, Psychosocial, and Learning Problems Group for the Cochrane Collaboration, and is the Co-chair for the Training Group for the Campbell Collaboration. His research has been published in Psychological Methods, Psychological Bulletin, Review of Educational Research, Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, and Education Evaluation and Public Policy Analysis.

Sandra Jo Wilson, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present
Co-Principal Investigator, 2012 - present

Sandra Jo Wilson is the Associate Director of the Peabody Research Institute and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Wilson also serves as the Editor for the Education Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has extensive experience in all aspects of systematic review and meta-analysis, and has authored numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses on education-related topics. Her professional interests are in research synthesis and meta-analysis, program evaluation, research methodology, and the effectiveness of educational and social interventions. Her current research concentrates on risk factors associated with school failure, the effectiveness of preschool programs for improving school readiness in young children, understanding the sources of variability in treatment effects, and the prevention of school dropout.

Emily Tanner-Smith, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor, 2012 - present

Dr. Emily Tanner-Smith is a Research Assistant Professor at the Peabody Research Institute and the Department of Human & Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Tanner-Smith also serves as the Associate Editor for the Methods Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has (co)authored several systematic reviews and meta-analyses on topics related to behavioral and social interventions. Her research broadly focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of prevention and treatment programs aimed at improving the educational, health, and social well-being of children and youth, with particular emphasis on adolescent substance abuse. Her current research focuses on the effectiveness of substance use intervention and treatment programs for youth, and the effect of school surveillance and school security mechanisms on students’ academic and behavioral outcomes.

Will Doyle, Ph.D.
Postsecondary Content Expert, 2013 - present

Will Doyle is an Associate Professor of higher education in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. His research includes evaluating the impact of higher education policy, the antecedents and outcomes of higher education policy at the state and federal levels, and the study of political behavior as it affects higher education. Before joining the faculty at Vanderbilt, he was Senior Policy Analyst at the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. He serves as an Associate Editor of Research in Higher Education and is on the editorial board of Journal of Higher Education and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. His work has appeared in outlets such as Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Teachers College Record, and Economic of Education Review. During 2004–13, he was an Associate Editor of Change magazine, where he wrote the “Playing the Numbers” column, which explained quantitative research to a broader policy and practitioner audience.

The team conducts reviews using the Postsecondary Education Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Primary Mathematics

Mark Dynarski, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2015 - present

Dr. Mark Dynarski is president of Pemberton Research, specializing in education and social program evaluation. Until 2010, Dr. Dynarski was vice president at Mathematica and the director of the WWC. Dr. Dynarski currently serves as the principal investigator of studies of teacher preparation programs and the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program. He also provides evaluation technical assistance to IES and its Regional Education Laboratories and for the Children & Youth Programme sponsored by the Atlantic Philanthropies in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Dr. Dynarski is currently a senior fellow (nonresident) of the Brookings Institution. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment, serving on its committee to evaluate school reforms in the District of Columbia. Previously, he was on the National Research Council’s committee to formulate indicators of progress in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education, and its committee to evaluate the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards. He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and presents findings at conferences of researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and journalists. He is an associate editor of Effective Education, on the editorial board of The Elementary School Journal, and has served as an associate editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and the Economics of Education Review.

Tom Loveless, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2013 - present

Dr. Tom Loveless is a nonresident senior fellow on education policy in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He has written articles for The Wilson Quarterly, Education Next, the American Journal of Education, Educational Policy, Educational Leadership, Educational Administration Quarterly, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. He also authors The Brown Center Report on American Education, an annual report explaining important trends in achievement test scores. Dr. Loveless has written a book, The Tracking Wars: State Reform Meets School Policy. He is also the editor of The Great Curriculum Debate: How Should We Teach Reading and Math? and Lessons Learned: What International Assessments Tell Us About Math Achievement. Dr. Loveless is a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He was selected as a National Academy of Education Spencer Post-Doctoral Fellow in 1995. From 2004 to 2012, Dr. Loveless represented the United States at the General Assembly of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Attainment, a 60-nation organization that governs international testing. From 2006 to 2008, he served on the President’s National Mathematics Advisory Panel.

The team conducts reviews using the Primary Mathematics Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Science

Steve Schneider
Principal Investigator, 2011 - 2015
Content Expert, 2011 - 2015

Andrei Streke, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2011 - 2015

The team conducted reviews using the Science Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently inactive and not conducting reviews.

Secondary Mathematics

Mark Dynarski, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2015 - present

Dr. Mark Dynarski is president of Pemberton Research, specializing in education and social program evaluation. Until 2010, Dr. Dynarski was vice president at Mathematica and the director of the WWC. Dr. Dynarski currently serves as the principal investigator of studies of teacher preparation programs and the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program. He also provides evaluation technical assistance to IES and its Regional Education Laboratories and for the Children & Youth Programme sponsored by the Atlantic Philanthropies in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Dr. Dynarski is currently a senior fellow (nonresident) of the Brookings Institution. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment, serving on its committee to evaluate school reforms in the District of Columbia. Previously, he was on the National Research Council’s committee to formulate indicators of progress in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education, and its committee to evaluate the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards. He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and presents findings at conferences of researchers, policymakers, practitioners, and journalists. He is an associate editor of Effective Education, on the editorial board of The Elementary School Journal, and has served as an associate editor of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and the Economics of Education Review.

Tom Loveless, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2013 - present

Dr. Tom Loveless is a nonresident senior fellow on education policy in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He has written articles for The Wilson Quarterly, Education Next, the American Journal of Education, Educational Policy, Educational Leadership, Educational Administration Quarterly, and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. He also authors The Brown Center Report on American Education, an annual report explaining important trends in achievement test scores. Dr. Loveless has written a book, The Tracking Wars: State Reform Meets School Policy. He is also the editor of The Great Curriculum Debate: How Should We Teach Reading and Math? and Lessons Learned: What International Assessments Tell Us About Math Achievement. Dr. Loveless is a member of the Koret Task Force on K–12 Education at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He was selected as a National Academy of Education Spencer Post-Doctoral Fellow in 1995. From 2004 to 2012, Dr. Loveless represented the United States at the General Assembly of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Attainment, a 60-nation organization that governs international testing. From 2006 to 2008, he served on the President’s National Mathematics Advisory Panel.

The team conducts reviews using the Secondary Mathematics Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Students with Learning Disabilities

Martha Bleeker, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2016 - present

Dr. Martha Bleeker is a senior survey researcher at Mathematica Policy Research and leads the development of review products on the WWC. She served as deputy for the Children Identified With or At Risk for an Emotional Disturbance topic area from its inception in 2009 until 2014, and now serves as the Lead Methodologist for all Special Education topic areas. She has also led the Single-Case Design (SCD) training and certification efforts since 2014. While at Mathematica, Dr. Bleeker has designed and conducted several impact evaluations of school-based programs using both experimental and quasi-experimental methods. For example, she has served as the deputy project director and survey director on Mathematica’s rigorous evaluations of the Playworks program and the Harlem Children's Zone-Healthy Harlem initiative.

Sharon Vaughn, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2009 - present

Dr. Sharon Vaughn holds the H. E. Hartfelder/Southland Corporation Regents Chair in Human Development and is currently the director of the Meadows Center for Preventing Educational Risk at the University of Texas. Dr. Vaughn is currently the principal investigator or co-principal investigator on several Institute for Education Sciences, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, and Office of Special Education Programs research grants investigating effective interventions for students with learning disabilities and behavior problems as well as students who are English language learners. Dr. Vaughn currently sits on a number of editorial review boards, including the American Education Research Journal, Review of Educational Research, the Journal of Learning Disabilities, the Journal of Special Education, and Learning Disabilities Research and Practice. From 2002 to 2005, she was the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Learning Disabilities. Dr. Vaughn is the recipient of the AERA Special Education SIG distinguished researcher award, and the author of more than 200 articles and 10 books that address the reading outcomes of students with learning difficulties, learning disabilities, and English language learners.

The team conducts reviews using the Students with a Specific Learning Disability Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Supporting Postsecondary Success

Sandra Jo Wilson, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Co-Principal Investigator, 2012 - present

Sandra Jo Wilson is the Associate Director of the Peabody Research Institute and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Wilson also serves as the Editor for the Education Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has extensive experience in all aspects of systematic review and meta-analysis, and has authored numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses on education-related topics. Her professional interests are in research synthesis and meta-analysis, program evaluation, research methodology, and the effectiveness of educational and social interventions. Her current research concentrates on risk factors associated with school failure, the effectiveness of preschool programs for improving school readiness in young children, understanding the sources of variability in treatment effects, and the prevention of school dropout.

Jeffrey Valentine, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present

Dr. Valentine is a Professor in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville. As an internationally-known expert, Dr. Valentine has written more than three dozen works that use, explain, or seek to improve the methods of systematic reviewing and meta-analysis. He co-edited (with Harris Cooper and Larry Hedges) the Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (Second Edition), is an Associate Editor for the peer-reviewed journal Research Synthesis Methods, is a Statistical Editor for the Developmental, Psychosocial, and Learning Problems Group for the Cochrane Collaboration, and is the Co-chair for the Training Group for the Campbell Collaboration. His research has been published in Psychological Methods, Psychological Bulletin, Review of Educational Research, Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, and Education Evaluation and Public Policy Analysis.

Will Doyle, Ph.D.
Senior Content Expert, 2013 - present

Will Doyle is an Associate Professor of higher education in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. His research includes evaluating the impact of higher education policy, the antecedents and outcomes of higher education policy at the state and federal levels, and the study of political behavior as it affects higher education. Before joining the faculty at Vanderbilt, he was Senior Policy Analyst at the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. He serves as an Associate Editor of Research in Higher Education and is on the editorial board of Journal of Higher Education and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. His work has appeared in outlets such as Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Teachers College Record, and Economic of Education Review. During 2004–13, he was an Associate Editor of Change magazine, where he wrote the “Playing the Numbers” column, which explained quantitative research to a broader policy and practitioner audience.

David DuBois, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. DuBois is a professor in the Division of Community Health Sciences within the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago and an IHRP Fellow. Dr. DuBois’s research has focused on the contribution of protective factors, particularly self-esteem and mentoring relationships, to resilience and holistic positive development and on translating knowledge in this area to the design of effective youth programs. Dr. DuBois is the author of many peer-reviewed articles. In addition to the journal articles, Dr. DuBois is a lead co-editor and co-author of two award winning books. Dr. DuBois's research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, DHHS Office of Minority Health, and the Institute of Education Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Society for Community Research and Action as well as a past Distinguished Fellow of the William T. Grant Foundation. He received his doctorate in clinical-community psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Carolyn Heinrich, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. Heinrich is a Professor of Public Policy and Education in the Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations at the Peabody College and a Professor of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Heinrich’s research focuses on education, workforce development, social welfare policy, program evaluation, and public management and performance management. She works directly with federal, state and local governments in her research to improve policy design and program effectiveness and also collaborates with nongovernmental organizations (such as the World Bank, UNICEF and others) to improve the impacts of economic and social investments in middle-income and developing countries. She received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contributions to the field of public policy analysis and management in 2004 and was elected to the National Academy of Public Administration in 2011.

Dolores Perin, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. Perin is a Professor of Psychology and Education at the Teachers College at Columbia University, where she also directs the Reading Specialist M.A. Program, which prepares students for state certification as teachers of literacy. Dr. Perin is also a senior research associate at Teachers College's Community College Research Center. Her research interests include the education of academically-underprepared students in secondary and postsecondary education, and adult literacy programs; and the preparation of teachers for reading and writing instruction in middle and high schools. She was a Principal Investigator on a large U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, 2006–2009 project. Her other work includes a preservice teacher project entitled "Enhancing Teacher Preparation for Adolescent Literacy through Interdisciplinary Learning Communities," funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York, a Sloan-funded study of community college developmental education, and state- and federally-funded projects in the integration of academic and career education, school-to-work transition, workplace literacy, and adult learning disabilities. She is the author of numerous published peer-reviewed journal articles. She teaches graduate courses in literacy assessment and intervention, diagnosis of reading and writing disabilities, and adult literacy and developmental education.

Barbara Tobolowsky, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2015 - present

Dr. Tobolowsky is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Texas Arlington. Dr. Tobolowsky’s research and expertise focuses on college student experiences, media, and dual enrollment. Specifically, her research focuses on the transition into and through college of unique populations and the media representation of college. She is the author of numerous published peer-reviewed articles and a co-editor on a published book in higher education. Dr. Tobolowsky is also on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the First-Year Experience Students in Transition. Dr. Tobolowsky has received support and funding through an iCAP Award, Institutional Approaches to First-Year Student Success, and a SEED Grant.

Heather Wathington, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2015 - present

Heather Wathington is the chief executive officer of the Maya Angelou Schools and the See Forever Foundation. The Maya Angelou Schools are a multi-campus collaboration of charter schools for disconnected youth dedicated to empowering young people to reach their potential and to transition to college, career, and a lifetime of success; the See Forever Foundation supports the schools to accomplish this mission. Prior to her recent appointment at the See Forever Foundation, Dr. Wathington was an assistant professor of education at the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. Her scholarship focuses on the academic achievement of low-income students and students of color in postsecondary education, with a specific focus on understanding the educational contexts, levers, and practices that promote greater academic success for these students. Wathington’s research spans the areas of college access, matriculation and persistence into higher education as well as postgraduate study and research training. Her research has been supported by more than $2.1 million in grants from the Institute for Education Sciences, the Houston Endowment, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health.

Bethany Gleason, Ph.D.
Evidence Manager, 2013 - present

Dr. Gleason is a research associate at the Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University. She is the evidence manager for the Transition to College and Supporting Postsecondary Success topic areas for the WWC. Dr. Gleason has been a Principal Investigator for studies and technical assistance projects for one of the ten Regional Educational Laboratories funded by IES. Much of her work has involved conducting quasi-experimental design studies and facilitating educator trainings in the areas of college and career readiness, teacher effectiveness, and family and community engagement in education. Dr. Gleason also has experience leading a state-wide, value-added assessment evaluation project for a state department of education. Gleason earned her doctorate degree in school psychology at Louisiana State University where her research focused on using value-added models to assess teacher and university effectiveness, K-12 academic and behavioral interventions, and psycho-educational assessments.

The team conducts reviews using the Supporting Postsecondary Success Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Teacher Training, Evaluation, and Compensation

James J. Lindsay, Ph.D.
Methodological Lead, 2013 - present

Dr. James J. Lindsay is a senior researcher at the American Institutes for Research. Since becoming a certified WWC reviewer in 2010, Dr. Lindsay has conducted reviews for the Foundational Reading practice guide and the Students with Learning Disabilities and Students with Intellectual Disabilities topic areas. He also has led a systematic review for REL Appalachia on the impacts of increased learning time on student achievement and another for Reading Is Fundamental on the impacts of children’s access to print material. Dr. Lindsay directs REL Midwest’s work with the Midwest Teacher Effectiveness Alliance, which focuses on the development of measures of teacher evaluation and an examination of teacher workforce patterns. He has published a number of other systematic reviews and co-authored a chapter about research synthesis and meta-analysis.

Jill M. Constantine, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2013 - present

Dr. Jill M. Constantine is a vice president at Mathematica. She is a nationally recognized education researcher and experienced project director. Dr. Constantine has been involved with both research and leadership of the WWC since 2005, serving initially as a principal investigator for the Beginning Reading review team and later moving into overall leadership of the WWC. She has led the development of several hallmarks of the WWC content and standards, including the WWC training and certification; the topic area review team process of identifying, prioritizing, and conducting reviews of interventions; and the Statistical, Technical, and Analysis Team. She has extensive experience directing large-scale studies in education, specializing in experimental and nonexperimental methods for assessing the effectiveness of education programs. Her substantive expertise includes teacher effectiveness, college access for low-income students, and early reading skills in young children. In addition to having directed the WWC, Dr. Constantine is the project director for the evaluation of the Teacher Incentive Fund, and has previously directed the impact evaluation of teacher preparation models, both for IES.

Andrew J. Wayne, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2013 - present

Dr. Andrew J. Wayne is a managing research analyst at the American Institutes for Research. He currently directs two projects related to teacher training, evaluation, and compensation: the Teacher and Leader Evaluation Systems Study and Approaches to Measuring Teacher Quality and Effective Professional Development. He has also led projects focused on teacher hiring practices, professional development programs, and peer assistance and review practices. His earlier work includes studies of alternative certification programs, grantees under the federal Transitions to Teaching program, and the implementation of provisions in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act related to teacher and paraprofessional qualifications. Dr. Wayne has contributed to the WWC since its first contract in 2004, when he served as a reviewer and deputy coordinator for the English Language Learners review team.

The team conducts reviews using the Teacher Training, Evaluation, and Compensation Evidence Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

Transition to College

Sandra Jo Wilson, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Co-Principal Investigator, 2012 - present

Sandra Jo Wilson is the Associate Director of the Peabody Research Institute and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Wilson also serves as the Editor for the Education Coordinating Group of the Campbell Collaboration, an organization that produces peer-reviewed monographs summarizing international research evidence on the effects of interventions in education, crime and justice, international development, and social welfare. She has extensive experience in all aspects of systematic review and meta-analysis, and has authored numerous systematic reviews and meta-analyses on education-related topics. Her professional interests are in research synthesis and meta-analysis, program evaluation, research methodology, and the effectiveness of educational and social interventions. Her current research concentrates on risk factors associated with school failure, the effectiveness of preschool programs for improving school readiness in young children, understanding the sources of variability in treatment effects, and the prevention of school dropout.

Jeffrey Valentine, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, 2012 - present
Methodological Lead, 2012 - present

Dr. Valentine is a Professor in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Louisville. As an internationally-known expert, Dr. Valentine has written more than three dozen works that use, explain, or seek to improve the methods of systematic reviewing and meta-analysis. He co-edited (with Harris Cooper and Larry Hedges) the Handbook of Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (Second Edition), is an Associate Editor for the peer-reviewed journal Research Synthesis Methods, is a Statistical Editor for the Developmental, Psychosocial, and Learning Problems Group for the Cochrane Collaboration, and is the Co-chair for the Training Group for the Campbell Collaboration. His research has been published in Psychological Methods, Psychological Bulletin, Review of Educational Research, Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics, and Education Evaluation and Public Policy Analysis.

Will Doyle, Ph.D.
Senior Content Expert, 2013 - present

Will Doyle is an Associate Professor of higher education in the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations at Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. His research includes evaluating the impact of higher education policy, the antecedents and outcomes of higher education policy at the state and federal levels, and the study of political behavior as it affects higher education. Before joining the faculty at Vanderbilt, he was Senior Policy Analyst at the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. He serves as an Associate Editor of Research in Higher Education and is on the editorial board of Journal of Higher Education and Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. His work has appeared in outlets such as Journal of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Teachers College Record, and Economic of Education Review. During 2004–13, he was an Associate Editor of Change magazine, where he wrote the “Playing the Numbers” column, which explained quantitative research to a broader policy and practitioner audience.

David DuBois, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. DuBois is a professor in the Division of Community Health Sciences within the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago and an IHRP Fellow. Dr. DuBois’s research has focused on the contribution of protective factors, particularly self-esteem and mentoring relationships, to resilience and holistic positive development and on translating knowledge in this area to the design of effective youth programs. Dr. DuBois is the author of many peer-reviewed articles. In addition to the journal articles, Dr. DuBois is a lead co-editor and co-author of two award winning books. Dr. DuBois's research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, DHHS Office of Minority Health, and the Institute of Education Sciences. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Society for Community Research and Action as well as a past Distinguished Fellow of the William T. Grant Foundation. He received his doctorate in clinical-community psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Carolyn Heinrich, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. Heinrich is a Professor of Public Policy and Education in the Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations at the Peabody College and a Professor of Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Heinrich’s research focuses on education, workforce development, social welfare policy, program evaluation, and public management and performance management. She works directly with federal, state and local governments in her research to improve policy design and program effectiveness and also collaborates with nongovernmental organizations (such as the World Bank, UNICEF and others) to improve the impacts of economic and social investments in middle-income and developing countries. She received the David N. Kershaw Award for distinguished contributions to the field of public policy analysis and management in 2004 and was elected to the National Academy of Public Administration in 2011.

Dolores Perin, Ph.D.
Content Expert, 2016 - present

Dr. Perin is a Professor of Psychology and Education at the Teachers College at Columbia University, where she also directs the Reading Specialist M.A. Program, which prepares students for state certification as teachers of literacy. Dr. Perin is also a senior research associate at Teachers College's Community College Research Center. Her research interests include the education of academically-underprepared students in secondary and postsecondary education, and adult literacy programs; and the preparation of teachers for reading and writing instruction in middle and high schools. She was a Principal Investigator on a large U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, 2006–2009 project. Her other work includes a preservice teacher project entitled "Enhancing Teacher Preparation for Adolescent Literacy through Interdisciplinary Learning Communities," funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York, a Sloan-funded study of community college developmental education, and state- and federally-funded projects in the integration of academic and career education, school-to-work transition, workplace literacy, and adult learning disabilities. She is the author of numerous published peer-reviewed journal articles. She teaches graduate courses in literacy assessment and intervention, diagnosis of reading and writing disabilities, and adult literacy and developmental education.

Bethany Gleason, Ph.D.
Evidence Manager, 2013 - present

Dr. Gleason is a research associate at the Peabody Research Institute, Vanderbilt University. She is the evidence manager for the Transition to College and Supporting Postsecondary Success topic areas for the WWC. Dr. Gleason has been a Principal Investigator for studies and technical assistance projects for one of the ten Regional Educational Laboratories funded by IES. Much of her work has involved conducting quasi-experimental design studies and facilitating educator trainings in the areas of college and career readiness, teacher effectiveness, and family and community engagement in education. Dr. Gleason also has experience leading a state-wide, value-added assessment evaluation project for a state department of education. Gleason earned her doctorate degree in school psychology at Louisiana State University where her research focused on using value-added models to assess teacher and university effectiveness, K-12 academic and behavioral interventions, and psycho-educational assessments.

The team conducts reviews using the Transition to College Review Protocol. This area is currently active and conducting reviews.

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