WWC review of this study

Effect of technology-enhanced continuous progress monitoring on math achievement.

Ysseldyke, J., & Bolt, D. M. (2007). School Psychology Review, 36(3), 453-467. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ788347

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    700
     Students
    , grades
    2-5
No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards with reservations

Reviewed: December 2017

Mathematics achievement outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

STAR Math Assessment

Accelerated Math® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
587 students

50.08

44.72

No

--
More Outcomes

Terra Nova Math

Accelerated Math® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
700 students

46.57

45.43

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 49%
    Male: 51%
  • Race
    Asian
    1%
    Black
    25%
    Native American
    1%
    Not specified
    8%
    White
    25%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    48%
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, Texas

Setting

The study includes five schools in four southern states (Alabama, Florida, South Carolina, and Texas) in grades 2–5. The study occurred in the 2003–04 school year.

Study sample

Among all students at the time of random assignment, approximately 49% were female, 48% were Hispanic, 25% were African-American, 25% were White, and less than 1% were Asian or Native American.

Intervention Group

Intervention students were taught using Accelerated Math® as a supplement to the existing math curriculum for the entire school year. The study does not describe how the program was used other than to note that teachers were assigned to use Accelerated Math® with their regular math curriculum. In practice, the program was not implemented for approximately 40% of grade 2–8 students in the intervention group; the authors did not report the percentage of grade 2–5 students in the intervention group of the analysis sample that did not participate in Accelerated Math®. The authors conducted an exploratory analyses to determine if certain types of students (for example, based on gender, ability, or race/ethnicity) were excluded and did not find systematic differences between those students participating and not participating. The study did not specify which edition or version of Accelerated Math® was used.

Comparison Group

Comparison students used their schools’ existing math curriculum, which was Harcourt Math or Silver Burdett Math in Alabama, Houghton Mifflin Math Central in Florida and South Carolina, and Sharon Wells Math or Harcourt Math in Texas.

Support for implementation

Intervention teachers received three to five visits from a Renaissance Learning Math Consultant to help them implement Accelerated Math® in their classrooms. This support included help on the use of the software’s progress monitoring features, administration of the STAR Math test, and use of the test results to inform student placement. Teachers also had unlimited access to technical support through Renaissance Learning’s toll-free number.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Bolt, D. M., Ysseldyke, J., & Patterson, M. J. (2010). Students, teachers, and schools as sources of variability, integrity, and sustainability in implementing progress monitoring. School Psychology Review, 39(4) 612–630.

  • Ysseldyke, J., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). High implementers of Accelerated Math show significant gains over low- or non-implementers. Madison, WI: Renaissance Learning, Inc.

Reviewed: July 2017

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Ysseldyke, J., & Bolt, D. M. (2005). High implementers of Accelerated Math show significant gains over low- or non-implementers. Madison, WI: Renaissance Learning, Inc.

  • Bolt, D. M., Ysseldyke, J., & Patterson, M. J. (2010). Students, teachers, and schools as sources of variability, integrity, and sustainability in implementing progress monitoring. School Psychology Review, 39(4) 612–630.

 

Your export should download shortly as a zip archive.

This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

Connect With the WWC

newsflash icon contact icon facebook icon twitter icon
loading
back to top