WWC review of this study

Evaluation of the Too Good for Drugs and Violence--High school prevention program.

Bacon, T. P. (2001). . A report produced for the Florida Department of Education, Department of Safe and Drug-Free Schools.

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    302
     Students
    , grades
    9-12
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations

Reviewed: September 2006

Knowledge, attitudes, & values outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Perceptions of social and resistance skills

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
302 students

4.08

3.77

Yes

 
 
20
More Outcomes

Perceptions of emotional competence

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
302 students

4.04

3.72

Yes

 
 
19

Intentions for marijuana (no intentions)

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
196 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
18

Positive attitudes towards nonviolence

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
302 students

3.78

3.52

Yes

 
 
13

Perceptions of assertiveness and efficacy

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
302 students

4.18

3.94

Yes

 
 
11

Perceptions of goal setting and decisionmaking skills

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
302 students

3.59

3.43

No

--

Intentions for fighting (no intentions)

Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFD & V) vs. Business as usual

Posttest

Grades 9 - 12;
150 students

N/A

N/A

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 54%
    Male: 46%
  • Race
    Black
    9%
    White
    79%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    9%
    Not Hispanic
    91%
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    Florida

Setting

One large school district in Florida.

Study sample

The study included 303 students in 20 classrooms across five high schools. About 54% of the total sample were females. The overall sample was primarily white (79%), with an equal number of African-American and Hispanic students (9%). The majority of the sample were ninth graders (81%) followed by 10% tenth graders, 5% eleventh graders, and 5% twelfth graders.

Intervention Group

The Too Good for Drugs and Violence (TGFDV) program, implemented during health or personal fitness classes, was integrated into the fourth quarter of instruction. Teachers delivered the programs in nine weeks rather than the program’s intended 18-week, or semester, time frame. Therefore, teachers delivered two lessons a week rather than one. In addition, the TGFDV program components related to infusing lesson units into other subject areas and strategies for community involvement were not implemented in this study.

Comparison Group

Students in the control group received the standard health and personal fitness curriculum and were not exposed to the TGFVD curriculum.

Outcome descriptions

Students responded to paper-and-pencil questionnaires that assessed intentions to use marijuana and engage in fighting, attitudes toward nonviolence, perceptions of emotional competency skills, perceptions of social and peer resistance skills, perceptions of assertiveness skills, attitudes toward drugs, perceptions of peer norms, perceptions of peer approval, and perceptions of goals and decisionmaking skills. (See Appendix A2 for a more detailed description of outcome measures.)

Support for implementation

Teachers received one day of training provided by representatives of the Mendez Foundation.

 

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This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

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