WWC review of this study

Building a foundation against violence: Impact of a school-based prevention program on elementary students.

Hall, B. W., & Bacon, T. P. (2005). Journal of School Violence, 4 (4), 63–83. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ845785

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    998
     Students
    , grade
    3
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations

Reviewed: September 2006

Behavior outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Teacher checklist of Student Behaviors- Total score

Too Good For Violence (TGFV) vs. None

20 week follow-up

Grade 3;
998 students

4.17

3.86

Yes

 
 
18
Knowledge, attitudes, & values outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Student Protective Factor Survey- Total score

Too Good For Violence (TGFV) vs. None

20 week follow-up

Grade 3;
998 students

3.89

3.7

Yes

 
 
16

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 17% English language learners

  • 54% Free or reduced price lunch

  • Female: 48%
    Male: 52%
  • Race
    Black
    12%
    Not specified
    8%
    White
    44%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    36%
    Not Hispanic
    64%

  • Rural, Suburban, Urban
    • B
    • A
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    Florida

Setting

One large school district in Florida serving students from urban, suburban, and rural regions.

Study sample

The study included 999 third-grade students from 10 elementary schools. Of the sample, 48% were females, 20% received exceptional education services, 17% received limited English proficiency services, 44% were Caucasian, 12.5% African-American, 36% Hispanic, and 7.5% “multicultural or other race.” About 54% of the students in the sample were eligible for participation in the free or reduced lunch program.

Intervention Group

The program was implemented during the first quarter of the school year. The program instructors in the intervention group delivered seven lesson units—one a week—over a seven-week period, with each lesson averaging 45 minutes in length.

Comparison Group

Students in the comparison group did not participate in the Too Good for Violence program. In addition, the comparison schools were asked to refrain from delivering any major prevention curriculum or program until the fourth quarter.

Outcome descriptions

The two measures, the Student Protective Factor Survey Questionnaire and the Teacher Checklist of Student Behaviors, were administered immediately after the intervention and again 20 weeks later. (See Appendices A2.1 and A2.2.)

Support for implementation

The program was delivered by program instructors (off-site educators). So no teacher training was conducted.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Bacon, T. P. (2003). Technical report: The effects of the Too Good for Violence prevention program on student behaviors and protective factors. Tampa, FL: C. E. Mendez Foundation, Inc. Available from: Mendez Foundation, 601 S. Magnolia Avenue, Tampa, FL 33606.

 

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