WWC review of this study

Effects of two shared-reading interventions on emergent literacy skills of at-risk preschoolers.

Lonigan, C. J., Anthony, J. L., Bloomfield, B. G., Dyer, S. M., & Samwel, C. S. (1999). Journal of Early Intervention, 22(4), 306–322. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ599243

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    66
     Students
    , grade
    PK

Reviewed: April 2015

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

Reviewed: April 2010

Study sample characteristics were not reported.
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations

Reviewed: February 2007

Oral language outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA-VE)

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
66 students

45.46

40.81

Yes

 
 
18
More Outcomes

Woodcock-Johnson (WJ): Literacy Comprehension

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
29 students

8.51

7.29

No

 
 
11

Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (EOWPVT-R)

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
66 students

88.51

87.97

No

--

Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test Revised (PPVT-R)

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
66 students

84.4

85.19

No

--
Phonological processing outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Alliteration oddity detection

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
61 students

3.93

2.28

No

 
 
40
More Outcomes

Sound blending

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
61 students

2.37

2.83

No

--

Rhyme oddity detection

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
61 students

3.74

3.9

No

--

Sound Elision

Dialogic Reading vs. Business as usual

Posttest

2-5 year olds;
61 students

2.85

3.55

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 46%
    Male: 54%
  • Race
    Black
    77%

  • Urban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Florida

Setting

The study took place in five child care centers in an urban area in Florida. Four centers served primarily children of families eligible for subsidized child care. The fifth center was affiliated with a church and approximately 25% of families served by the church center received a state child care subsidy.

Study sample

The study began with 110 children; 15 children left the child care centers, leaving a sample of 95 children. Most of the children were from low-income families. The mean age of the child participants was 45.1 months (range 25 to 64 months). Forty-six percent were female and 77% were African-American. Results for the 66 children who had been randomly assigned within center to the Dialogic Reading and no-treatment comparison conditions are included in this report.

Intervention Group

The study included two intervention groups: Dialogic Reading and typical shared book reading. The Dialogic Reading intervention is included in this review; results involving typical shared book reading are included in the WWC Shared Book Reading report. In the Dialogic Reading condition, trained undergraduate volunteers engaged in Dialogic Reading intervention sessions for 10 to 15 minutes each day across a six-week period. Children were read to in small groups of three to five children in a location outside the classroom.

Comparison Group

Children in the no-treatment comparison group engaged in their standard preschool curriculum.

Outcome descriptions

The primary outcome domains were children’s oral language and phonological processing. The study used the following standardized measures: the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R), the Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (EOWPVT-R), the Verbal Expression subscale of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA-VE), and the Listening Comprehension subtest of the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery (WJ-LC). The study also utilized four measures of phonological processing: rhyme oddity detection, alliteration oddity detection, sound blending, and sound elision (see Appendices A2.1 and 2.3 for more detailed descriptions of outcome measures).

Support for implementation

Undergraduate volunteer readers were trained in Dialogic Reading style using a videotape training method, which covered the two phases of Dialogic Reading. During the training, the trainees were presented with Dialogic Reading guidelines and watched vignettes of adult-child shared book reading that followed or did not follow the guidelines. Trainees analyzed the vignettes and had one-on-one role plays with the trainer. The phase one and phase two training sessions lasted for 30 and 20 minutes respectively.

 

Your export should download shortly as a zip archive.

This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

Connect With the WWC

newsflash icon contact icon facebook icon twitter icon
loading
back to top