WWC review of this study

The effect of READ 180 on the reading achievement of struggling readers in a large, public, urban high school in northern New Jersey (Doctoral dissertation).

Yurchak, S. M. (2013). Available from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses database. (UMI No. 3613825) Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED567305

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    134
     Students
    , grade
    9
No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards with reservations

Reviewed: November 2016

Comprehension outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Analyzing Text Cluster Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
134 students

38.51

39.3

No

--
More Outcomes

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Reading Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
134 students

41.31

42.7

No

--
Show Supplemental Findings

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Analyzing Text Cluster Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Female;
61 students

40.15

39.8

No

--

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Reading Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Black;
23 students

40.6

40.3

No

--

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Analyzing Text Cluster Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Black;
23 students

37.5

37.8

No

--

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Analyzing Text Cluster Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Male;
73 students

37.82

38.9

No

--

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Reading Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Male;
73 students

41.32

42.7

No

--

New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment Reading Score

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Female;
61 students

40.8

42.7

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 67% Free or reduced price lunch

  • Female: 48%
    Male: 52%
  • Race
    Black
    17%
    White
    43%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    40%
    Not Hispanic
    60%

  • Urban
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    New Jersey

Setting

The study took place in a single, large urban high school in northern New Jersey.

Study sample

This study used a quasi-experimental design, matching students in grade 9 receiving READ 180® instruction with students in regular English 9 classes on pretest Language Arts Literacy (LAL) scores from the grade 8 state assessment. Students were eligible for the study if they did not meet proficiency levels on the Language Arts Literacy (portion of the grade 8 state assessment, and if they were on the general education track in school. The overall sample is made up of students in grade 9 from three consecutive cohorts from the 2007–08, 2008–09, and 2009–10 school years. Only students with complete data (those who were in the same school district in grades 8–11) were eligible to be matched and be in the study. The study took place in one school. READ 180® was offered in six class sections the first year, four class sections the second year, and five class sections the third year. Across the cohorts, 67 students had complete data and were able to be matched to students who had participated in English 9.The intervention and comparison groups were both 52% male. The intervention group was 52% White, 27% Hispanic, and 20% African American. The comparison group was 52% Hispanic, 34% White, and 13% African American. The majority of students in both the intervention group (61%) and the comparison group (72%) qualified for free or reduced-price lunch.

Intervention Group

Students in the intervention group were exposed to the READ 180® intervention for a full school year. Classes were 80 minutes daily, which closely resembled the prototypical 90-minute five-class instructional model. Of the 15 READ 180® sections, 13 were inclusion-based classrooms, and two were general education. Inclusion classes were taught by a content-certified English teacher and a special education teacher; general education sections were taught by a content-certified English teacher.

Comparison Group

Comparison students took part in the standard English 9 course, which was 40 minutes long.

Support for implementation

Teachers delivering the intervention were trained by READ 180® personnel or others in the district who were previously trained in READ 180®.

 

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