WWC review of this study

Understanding the effect of KIPP as it scales: Volume I, Impacts on achievement and other outcomes. Final report of KIPP’s Investing in Innovation grant evaluation [High School].

Tuttle, C. C., Gleason, P., Knechtel, V., Nichols-Barrer, I., Booker, K., Chojnacki, G., ... Goble, L. (2015). Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED560079

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    2,260
     Students
    , grades
    9-12

Reviewed: January 2018

At least one finding shows moderate evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations
English language arts achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide assessment of general literacy achivement (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

High school: matched-student sample (new entrants);
1,748 students

0.11

-0.07

Yes

 
 
7
 
More Outcomes

TerraNova Reading (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

High school: matched-school sample (same cohort);
512 students

0.26

0.10

Yes

 
 
6
 

TerraNova Language (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

High school: matched-school sample (same cohort);
512 students

0.07

-0.05

No

--
Show Supplemental Findings

Standardized Score for English/Language Arts (ELA)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

5 Years

Cumulative middle and high school matched-student sample;
4,001 students

0.38

0.09

Yes

 
 
12
General Mathematics Achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide mathematics assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

High school: matched-student sample (new entrants);
1,416 students

0.24

-0.04

Yes

 
 
11
 
More Outcomes

TerraNova Mathematics Test

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

High school: matched-school sample (same cohort);
512 students

0.07

-0.07

No

--
Show Supplemental Findings

Standardized Score for Mathematics

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

5 Years

Cumulative middle and high school matched-student sample;
2,930 students

0.34

0.00

Yes

 
 
13
Science achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide science assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

High school: matched-student sample (new entrants);
1,299 students

0.11

-0.22

Yes

 
 
13
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Statewide science assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

5 Years

Cumulative middle and high school matched-student sample;
3,582 students

0.42

0.00

Yes

 
 
16
Social studies achievement outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide social studies assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

High school: matched-student sample (new entrants);
601 students

-0.13

-0.15

No

--
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

State and local assessments of social studies achievement (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

5 Years

Cumulative middle and high school matched-student sample;
1,495 students

0.18

-0.09

Yes

 
 
11
Student progression outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

High school graduation

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

4 Years

High school: matched-student sample (new entrants);
852 students

0.71

0.67

No

--
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

High school graduation

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

8 Years

Cumulative middle and high school matched-student sample;
2,033 students

0.79

0.65

Yes

 
 
16

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 8% English language learners

  • 84% Free or reduced price lunch

  • Female: 55%
    Male: 45%
  • Race
    Black
    53%
    Not specified
    47%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    44%
    Not Hispanic
    56%

  • Rural, Suburban, Urban
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    California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Georgia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas

Setting

The two analyses included in the report include students and schools in multiple states and districts in the United States where KIPP charter schools operate. The study took place in 18 high schools in the KIPP network.

Study sample

The study used two designs. The first, for the analysis of new KIPP entrants (new KIPP student analysis), is a matched-student quasi-experimental design, where the intervention group consisted of students who attended 14 KIPP high schools, and the comparison group was a sample matched based on student baseline characteristics: baseline reading and math test scores; gender, race, special education, limited English proficiency, and free or reduced-price lunch status; and whether the student repeated a grade in the baseline year. The second design, for the analysis of middle school KIPP students transitioning to high schools (continuing KIPP student analysis), the intervention group included KIPP middle school students who had the option to attend the local KIPP high school after completing grade 8. These students attended 8 KIPP high schools (including 4 that were in the new KIPP student analysis). The comparison group consisted of KIPP students in grade 8 (in the same year) from middle schools in regions with no KIPP high school open at the time. The comparison group was chosen from KIPP middle schools that most resembled the treatment middle schools on the basis of average school-level characteristics. Within that matched set of schools, a comparison sample of students was matched based on baseline reading and math test scores; gender, race, special education, limited English proficiency, and free or reduced-price lunch status; and whether the student repeated a grade in the baseline year. For the new KIPP student analysis, sample characteristics for analysis samples with non-imputed baseline data are not reported. For the continuing KIPP student analysis, 55% of students in the intervention condition were female, 49% were Black, and 38% were Hispanic. Among students in the comparison condition, 54% were female, 49% were Black, and 45% were Hispanic.

Intervention Group

For the new KIPP student analysis, students in the intervention condition entered the KIPP network for the first time in grade 9. For the continuing KIPP student analysis, students in the intervention condition attended KIPP middle schools in grade 8 and had the option to attend KIPP high schools in grade 9. The majority of the students in the intervention condition attended KIPP high schools.

Comparison Group

For the new KIPP student analysis, students in the comparison condition were from non-KIPP middle schools who remained at non-KIPP public schools in their high school years. For the continuing KIPP student analysis, students in the comparison condition attended KIPP middle schools in grade 8 and did not have the option to attend KIPP high schools in grade 9 because no local KIPP high schools were open at the time. Students in the comparison condition attended a wide variety of non-KIPP high schools.

Support for implementation

The study did not provide information about implementation support; however, authors noted that staff at KIPP schools had considerable autonomy in the implementation process to set the direction of the school (p. 22).

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Tuttle, C. C., Gleason, P., Knechtel, V., Nichols-Barrer, I., Booker, K., Chojnacki, G., ... Goble, L. (2015). Going to scale: As KIPP network grows, positive impacts are sustained (In Focus brief). Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.

 

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