WWC review of this study

Understanding the effect of KIPP as it scales: Volume I, Impacts on achievement and other outcomes. Final report of KIPP’s Investing in Innovation grant evaluation [Middle School; RCT].

Tuttle, C. C., Gleason, P., Knechtel, V., Nichols-Barrer, I., Booker, K., Chojnacki, G., ... Goble, L. (2015). Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED560079

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    607
     Students
    , grades
    6-8

Reviewed: January 2018

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
English language arts achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide assessment of reading achievement (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Middle school: lottery sample;
458 students

-0.13

-0.28

Yes

 
 
6
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Statewide assessment of reading achievement (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

Middle school: lottery sample;
563 students

-0.16

-0.34

Yes

 
 
7

Statewide assessment of reading achievement (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Middle school: lottery sample;
608 students

-0.23

-0.26

No

--
General Mathematics Achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Statewide mathematics assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Middle school: lottery sample;
455 students

0.01

-0.17

Yes

 
 
7
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Statewide mathematics assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

2 Years

Middle school: lottery sample;
555 students

-0.01

-0.25

Yes

 
 
9

Statewide mathematics assessments (z-score)

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Middle school: lottery sample;
607 students

-0.12

-0.22

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 86% Free or reduced price lunch

  • Female: 53%
    Male: 47%
  • Race
    Black
    44%
    Not specified
    52%
    White
    4%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    51%
    Not Hispanic
    49%

  • Urban
    • B
    • A
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    • y

    California, Georgia, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas

Setting

This analysis includes students and schools in multiple states and districts in the United States where KIPP charter schools operate. The study took place in 43 middle schools in the KIPP network in 20 cities across the following 12 states and the District of Columbia: Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas.

Study sample

The study used a lottery-based randomized controlled trial design, where KIPP applicants that won admission to the KIPP middle school through the lottery formed the intervention group, and those whose lottery draw led to their not being offered admission formed the comparison group. Of the 60 KIPP middle schools open in 2011–12, 16 were sufficiently oversubscribed to conduct a lottery and be included in the RCT analysis. The sample after random assignment included 891 students, with a intervention group of 459 students offered admission and a comparison group of 432 students not offered admission. Among students in the intervention condition in the analysis sample, 53% were female, 51% were Hispanic, 44% were Black, 86% were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, 51% lived in bilingual homes or homes where a language other than English was the main language, 44% had mothers with a high school education or less, and 35% were from single-parent households. Among students in the comparison condition in the analysis sample, 51% were female, 47% were Hispanic, 44% were Black, 86% were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, 44% lived in bilingual homes or homes where a language other than English was the main language, 50% had mothers with a high school education or less, and 27% were from single-parent households.

Intervention Group

Students in the intervention condition were offered admission to a KIPP middle school, and 72% of the intervention students attended a KIPP middle school.

Comparison Group

Students in the comparison condition were not offered admission to a KIPP middle school. The majority of comparison students attended non-KIPP middle schools, though 5% attended a KIPP middle school at some point during the follow-up period.

Support for implementation

The study did not provide information about implementation support; however, authors noted that staff at KIPP schools had considerable autonomy in the implementation process to set the direction of the school (p. 22).

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Tuttle, C. C., Gleason, P., Knechtel, V., Nichols-Barrer, I., Booker, K., Chojnacki, G., ... Goble, L. (2015). Going to scale: As KIPP network grows, positive impacts are sustained (In Focus brief). Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.

  • Gleason, P. M., Tuttle, C. C., Gill, B., Nichols-Barrer, I., & Teh, B. (2014). Do KIPP schools boost student achievement?. Education Finance and Policy, 9(1), 36–58.

  • Tuttle, C. C., Teh, B., Nichols-Barrer, I., Gill, B., & Gleason, P. (2010). Supplemental analytic sample equivalence tables for student characteristics and achievement in 22 KIPP middle schools: A report from the National Evaluation of KIPP Middle Schools. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.

  • Tuttle, C. C., Teh, B., Nichols-Barrer, I., Gill, B., & Gleason, P. (2010). Student characteristics and achievement in 22 KIPP middle schools: Final report. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.

  • Tuttle, C. C., Gill, B., Gleason, P., Knechtel, V., Nichols-Barrer, I., & Resch, A. (2013). KIPP middle schools: Impacts on achievement and other outcomes, final report. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research.

 

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