WWC review of this study

Evaluating the implementation of the Pyramid Model for promoting social-emotional competence in early childhood classrooms.

Hemmeter, M. L., Snyder, P., Fox, L., & Algina, J. (2016). Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 36, 133-146. . Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1117049

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    437
     Students
    , grade
    PK

Reviewed: October 2017

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Behavior outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Social Skills Improvement System: Social Skills

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Full sample;
435 students

99.30

92.10

Yes

 
 
17
 
More Outcomes

Social Skills Improvement Index: Problem Behavior (reverse coded)

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Full sample;
437 students

-99.20

-103.70

Yes

 
 
12
 
Show Supplemental Findings

Focal Child Observation System: Social Interactions

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Clinical/borderline symptoms subsample;
97 students

19.90

15.60

No

--

Focal Child Observation System: Problem Behaviors (reverse coded)

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Clinical/borderline symptoms subsample;
97 students

-7.10

-8.10

No

--
Teacher instruction outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS): Classroom Organization

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Full sample;
40 teachers

5.07

4.80

No

--
More Outcomes

Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS): Instructional Support composite

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Full sample;
40 teachers

5.49

5.35

No

--

Classroom Assessment Scoring System: Emotional Support

Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence (Pyramid Model) vs. Business as usual

8 Months

Full sample;
40 teachers

2.06

2.11

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.

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    Florida, Tennessee
  • Race
    Black
    37%
    White
    43%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    18%

Setting

The study takes place in preschool classrooms in schools in Tennessee and Florida. Only one teacher per school was used in the study.

Study sample

Demographic information for the full sample was reported. Table 3 provides demographic data for the focal students (students in each classroom identified as exhibiting either clinical or borderline scores on any of several subscales on the C-TRF) only.

Intervention Group

The intervention group received professional development focused on the Pyramid Model and how to implement it in the classroom. Each teacher attended a 3-day (19.5 hours) workshop in the fall. In the workshop introduced the Pyramid Model and practices through lecture, video examples, case studies, and handouts. Opportunities were available for discussion about how to implement the Pyramid Model in their classrooms. Teachers also received a set of implementation guides with accompanying CDs. During the schoolyear, teachers received weekly individualized coaching. Coaching involved observation in the classroom, debriefing with time for reflection and feedback, and a follow up email. There were an average of 13.4 coaching sessions per teacher (range – 7-17). The variance in the number of coaching sessions was due to logistical issues related to scheduling coaching sessions. The Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool (TPOT) was administered at each wave of data collection to inform an action plan for the teacher during coaching and to measure fidelity of implementation of practices related to the Pyramid model

Comparison Group

The comparison condition was business-as-usual. 55% reported they had received some form of professional development related to social-emotional development and 80% reported receiving some support for individual children with challenging behavior. The Teaching Pyramid Observation Tool (TPOT) was administered at each wave of data collection, as with the intervention group, but it does not appear that the comparison group teachers were provided feedback on their results during the study period. Teachers in the comparison group were offered the intervention professional development after data collection had ended.

Support for implementation

A 3 day workshop was conducted the beginning of the year, followed by individual weekly coaching sessions. Checks for fidelity of implementation were performed at 4 points in the school year.

 

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