WWC review of this study

Des Moines Area Community College Workforce Training Academy Connect Program: Implementation and early impact report (OPRE Report No. 2018-82)

Hamadyk, J., Zeidenberg, M. (2018). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED618157

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    743
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: August 2020

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Earnings (short-run) outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Working in a job paying $12/hour or more

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
725 students

23.27

22.53

No

--
Employment (short-run) outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Working in a job requiring at least mid-level skills

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
740 students

10.08

7.51

No

--
Industry-recognized credential, certificate, or license (short-run) outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Received an occupational or educational credential from any source

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
743 students

20.38

14.40

Yes

 
 
10
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Received a credential from a licensing/certification body

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
743 students

16.58

10.40

Yes

 
 
13

Received a credential from a college

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
743 students

8.42

5.60

No

--

Received a credential from a non-college education or training institution

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
743 students

2.45

4.53

No

--
Progressing in college outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Hours of college occuptional training

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
731 students

70.10

48.34

No

--
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Hours of college occupational training at college

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
732 students

54.77

37.79

No

--

Hours of college occupational training at a place other than college

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
742 students

14.99

10.41

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 63%
    Male: 37%

  • Urban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
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    • F
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    • a
    • h
    • i
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    Iowa
  • Race
    Black
    47%
    Other or unknown
    19%
    White
    34%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    15%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    85%

Setting

The study took place in a community college in the Midwest.

Study sample

The initial sample consisted of 943 learners. These learners had math and reading skills between the 6th and 8th grade level. Sixty-three percent of learners were female. Thirty-four percent were White non-Hispanic, 47 percent were Black non-Hispanic, and 15 percent were Hispanic. Fourteen percent of learners were age 20 or younger, 16 percent were ages 21 to 24, 28 percent were ages 25 to 34, and 42 percent were age 35 or older. Forty percent had less than a high school degree, and 37 percent had a high school diploma or the equivalent. Learners reported an average income at the start of the study of $16,364. On measures of socioeconomic status, 66 percent reported receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); 14 percent reported receiving public assistance or welfare; and 63 percent reported experiencing financial hardship.

Intervention Group

Workforce Training Academy Connect (WTA Connect) gives low-skill learners an opportunity to enroll in occupational certificate courses that they would otherwise be ineligible to take. Learners had access to basic skills remediation through online courses, advisors who provided support during enrollment and monitored academic progress, and employment assistance resources upon completion of an occupational certificate course. Learners took the remediation and occupational training courses tuition-free and could receive transportation assistance and screening for public benefit eligibility.

Comparison Group

The comparison group continued to use existing education, training, and support services available in the community outside of the WTA Connect program. Additionally, learners could access training and services at the college or from other sources in the community. Some of these services, such as screening for benefits eligibility, were like services offered by WTA Connect.

Support for implementation

The study does not provide specific information about support for implementation.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Hamadyk, J., & Zeidenberg, M. (2018). Des Moines Area Community College Workforce Training Academy Connect Program: Implementation and early impact report (appendices) (OPRE Report No. 2018-82). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/images/opre/dmacc_implementation_and_early_impact_report_appendices_10_17_18.pdf.

 

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