WWC review of this study

Accelerating Connections to Employment. Vol. I. Final evaluation report

Modicamore, D., Lamb, Y., Taylor, J., Takyi-Laryea, A., Karageorge, K., & Ferroggiaro, E. (2017). ICF.

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    2,064
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: January 2021

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Earnings (short-run) outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Earnings in Year 1

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

New Haven;
348 students

14125.19

12578.79

No

--
More Outcomes

Earnings in Year 1

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Maryland and Texas;
1,513 students

12897.00

11601.80

Yes

 
 
5
 

Earnings in Year 1

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Atlanta;
203 students

5783.50

7154.60

No

--
Employment (short-run) outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Employed in Year 1

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
2,064 students

62.60

51.90

Yes

 
 
10
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Employed in Year 1

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Maryland and Texas;
1,513 students

82.10

69.20

Yes

 
 
17
Industry-recognized credential, certificate, or license (short-run) outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Holds a vocational, technical,or professional certificate or license

Adult Education vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
1,049 students

53.50

35.40

Yes

 
 
17
 


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 71%
    Male: 30%
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    Connecticut, Georgia, Maryland, Texas
  • Race
    Asian
    3%
    Black
    71%
    Native American
    1%
    Other or unknown
    9%
    Pacific Islander
    1%
    White
    15%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    11%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    89%

Setting

The study took place in nine Workforce Investment Board sites in four states.

Study sample

The initial sample consisted of 2,168 learners. These learners had to possess basic skills, including basic language proficiency, among other eligibility criteria. Minimum and maximum cut scores on skills assessments varied by Workforce Investment Board site. Learner characteristics varied by state. The percentage of learners who were White ranged from 1.5 to 54 percent. The percentage of learners who were Black ranged from 36 to 96 percent. The percentage of learners who were Latino ranged from 1.5 to 40 percent. Between 52 and 92 percent of learners were female, and between 4.6 and 58 percent of learners had less than a high school diploma.

Intervention Group

The Accelerating Connections to Employment (ACE) program is in part based on Washington State’s Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training model, and incorporates basic skills, occupational skills, and job readiness training. Key features of the ACE model included IET delivered through co-teaching, and co-enrollment with credit courses that allowed learners to earn credentials, career navigation, and support services (including academic and transportation support).

Comparison Group

The comparison group had access to the existing training and services available for workers in each state. Compared with the ACE program, existing services were less likely to offer advanced career services.

Support for implementation

The study does not provide specific information about support for implementation.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Modicamore, D., Lamb, Y., Taylor, J., Takyi-Laryea, A., Karageorge, K., & Ferroggiaro, E. (2017). Accelerating connections to employment. Vol. II. Final evaluation report appendices. ICF. https://resources.baltimorecountymd.gov/Documents/EconomicDevel/acevolume2.pdf.

 

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This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

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