WWC review of this study

Pima Community College Pathways to Healthcare Program: Implementation and Early Impact Report

Gardiner, K., Rolston, H., D., Fein, D. and S. Cho (2017). OPRE Report No. 2017-10, Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    1,217
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: October 2019

At least one finding shows promising evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Credit accumulation outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Total number of credits earned

Pathways to Healthcare vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
1,217 students

1.50

1.70

No

--
Industry-recognized credential, certificate, or license completion outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Earned credential

Pathways to Healthcare vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
1,217 students

34.60

29.40

Yes

 
 
6
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Earned credential

Pathways to Healthcare vs. Business as usual

30 Months

Full sample;
806 students

37.30

17.70

Yes

 
 
23
Postsecondary degree attainment outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

postsecondary degree attainment

Pathways to Healthcare vs. Business as usual

18 Months

Full sample;
1,217 students

23.10

10.40

Yes

 
 
22
 


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 83%
    Male: 17%

  • Urban
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    Arizona
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    56%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    44%

Setting

The setting was a community college and local workforce agency in the U.S. southwest.

Study sample

The sample member characteristics were consistent with nontraditional students. Members were low-income (approximately half had annual household incomes of less than $15,000 and a mean household income of $17,000); approximately two-thirds received SNAP or WIC benefits). They were also older than traditional college students, and had low levels of education (8% had less than a high school degree, and 35% had a high school degree or equivalent). The majority of participants were female (83%), and more than half were Hispanic (56%). Approximately two-thirds (66%) were not currently working at the time of randomization, and 12% were working 35 hours or more per week.

Intervention Group

The intervention provided intensive and proactive staff guidance and advising to participants. It also provided scholarships for tuition, books, and program supplies. Participants could participate in a 10-week "College Readiness" bridge class if they were not academically ready to enroll in an occupational training program. Otherwise, participants were able to enroll in occupational programs. Treatment group participants were able to enter a Nursing Assistant program. The intervention also provided supports such as resume preparation, coaching for interviews, a networking group, and other job assistance to help program completers find and secure employment.

Comparison Group

Individuals in the comparison condition were not able to access any of the program specific supports, but could access other training programs and services at the community college. Control group students were able to receive financial aid based on eligibility and availability (Pell grants) and standard employment services from the community one-stop center.

Support for implementation

No information provided.

 

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