WWC review of this study

Does inducing students to schedule lecture watching in online classes improve their academic performance? An experimental analysis of a time management intervention

Baker, R., Evans, B., Li, Q., & Cung, B. (2019). Research in Higher Education, 60, 521-552 Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1216401

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    145
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: June 2020

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards without reservations
General academic achievement (college) outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Final course grade

Scheduling watching video lectures vs. (Not applicable)

3 Weeks

Full sample;
145 students

82.50

80.45

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 56%
  • Race
    Asian
    68%
    Black
    2%
    Not specified
    10%
    White
    9%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    13%

Setting

This study took place in an online undergraduate STEM course from a selective, public 4-year university. The course was lower division and required for the major, with calculus as a pre- or co-requisite. The course was offered over a 5-week period during the summer, and allowed students to earn the same amount of credits as the 10-week course offered during the academic year.

Study sample

The average age of participants was 20 years and 56 percent were female. Sixty-eight percent of the sample reported their race/ethnicity as Asian/Pacific Islander, with 13 percent reporting as Hispanic, 9 percent reporting as white, and 2 percent reporting as black. The remaining 10 percent indicated other or did not provide their race/ethnicity. The majority (71%) were in their sophomore year of college, and half (50%) were first generation college students.

Intervention Group

On the frst day of week one and week two, students in the intervention group received an email from the instructor with a link to an online scheduling survey asking them to schedule the day and time they would watch each of the video lectures for that week.

Comparison Group

On the first day of week one and week two, students in the comparison group received an email from the instructor asking them to respond to an online survey about how they watched the course lectures. In week one students were asked which web browser they used to access the course; in week two they were asked if they listened to the lecture using the computer’s speakers or using headphones.

Support for implementation

No support for implementation was described.

 

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