WWC review of this study

A study of the developing relations between self-regulation and mathematical knowledge in the context of an early math intervention [Pre-K Mathematics vs. business as usual (Creative Curriculum)]

DeFlorio, L., Klein, A., Starkey, P., Swank, P. R., Taylor, H. B., Halliday, S. E., Beliakoff, A., & Mulcahy, C. (2019). Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 46, 33–48.

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    281
     Students
    , grade
    PK

Reviewed: May 2022

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Mathematics outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Child Math Assessment (CMA)

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
281 students

0.63

0.51

Yes

 
 
26
 
Self-regulation outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Self-regulation Bear/Dragon task

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
231 students

8.71

7.70

No

--
More Outcomes

Yarn Tangle

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
234 students

3.48

3.15

No

--

Day-Night Stroop task

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
233 students

10.89

10.18

No

--

Self-regulation gift delay - wrap task

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
234 students

15.23

15.38

No

--

Self-regulation gift delay - bow task

Pre-K Mathematics vs. Business as usual

0 Days

One-year Pre-K Mathematics vs comparison;
233 students

37.65

38.40

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 39% English language learners

  • Female: 49%
    Male: 51%
  • Race
    Asian
    6%
    Black
    18%
    Other or unknown
    71%
    White
    6%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    60%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    40%

Setting

The study was conducted in 44 preschool sites. All study preschool sites were Head Start centers with the exception of one state funded pre-kindergarten program.

Study sample

Participating children were 3.38 years old on average at the beginning of the study (at the start of their preschool entry year). The baseline sample for the 1-Year Intervention (I-1; Pre-K Mathematics only intervention) and comparison conditions included 347 children. The baseline sample was 49% female, 51% male, 17.6% African American, 5.8% Asian/Pacific Islander, 5.5% Caucasian, and 71.1% of the children belonged to unknown or other racial category. The majority of children (59.9%) were Hispanic. Approximately 39% of the sample spoke Spanish as their first language.

Intervention Group

The intervention of interest in the current review focuses on the 1-year exposure condition. Pre-K Mathematics, is a Tier-1 curricular intervention and consists of small-group classroom and dyadic home math activities. The mathematics content includes counting and number sense, arithmetic, space and geometry, patterns, and measurement and data. The curriculum dosage includes 48 small-group sessions plus periodic review, and 13 home activities. The curriculum was implemented throughout the entire pre-k school year.

Comparison Group

Teachers in the comparison condition received no professional development and continued using business-as-usual math practices found in Creative Curriculum.

Support for implementation

Teachers implementing the Pre-K Mathematics only intervention participated in seven days of professional-development workshops and received bi-weekly in-class coaching.

 

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