WWC review of this study

Performance of District 23 students participating in Scholastic READ 180.

White, R., Williams, I., & Haslam, M. B. (2005). Washington, DC: Policy Studies Associates.

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    1,097
     Students
    , grades
    4-8
No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards with reservations

Reviewed: November 2016

Comprehension outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

New York State Department of Education End-Of-Year Test in English Language Arts (NYSDE/ELA)

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Grade: 8 Lvl 3;
201 students

718

707

No

 
 
25
More Outcomes

New York State Department of Education End-Of-Year Test in English Language Arts (NYSDE/ELA)

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Grade: 8 Lvl 2;
425 students

689

686

No

--

CTB/McGraw-Hill Reading Test

READ 180® vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Grade: 6 Lvl 2;
471 students

642

639

No

--

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 3% English language learners
  • Race
    Black
    86%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    27%
    Not Hispanic
    73%

  • Urban
    • B
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    New York

Setting

The study took place in 16 schools in New York City’s District 23 in Brooklyn.

Study sample

Students receiving READ 180® instruction in the 16 participating schools were compared to students within the same schools who had never participated in READ 180®. The full sample of 617 READ 180® students and 4,619 students in the comparison group had similar percentages of African-American students (86% intervention, 84% comparison), Hispanic students (14% intervention, 15% comparison), female students (54% intervention, 51% comparison), students eligible for special education (6% intervention, 11% comparison), and students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch (91% intervention, 90% comparison). Both groups had the same percentages of students who were eligible for EL services (3%) and who were recent immigrants (3%). Main analysis samples were excluded from review because either they were not eligible or they did not meet WWC group design standards. For example, there were no intervention students in the grade 7 analysis sample; therefore, grade 7 students were excluded from this review. Moreover, results of an author query revealed that the samples of students in grades 4, 5, 6, and 8 did not establish baseline equivalence on the analytic sample, either combined or separately by grade. This review is based on the analytic sample which consists of three subgroups of students that were found to be equivalent at baseline: • Grade 6, proficiency level 2 [Basic]: This subgroup consisted of 64 students in the intervention group and 407 in the comparison group. • Grade 8, proficiency level 2 [Basic]: This subgroup consisted of 47 students in the intervention group and 378 in the comparison group. • Grade 8, proficiency level 3 [Proficient]: This subgroup consisted of 10 students in the intervention group and 191 in the comparison.

Intervention Group

The intervention group received READ 180® during the 2001–02 school year.

Comparison Group

The comparison group received business-as-usual instruction in the same schools that served the intervention group during the 2001–02 school year.

Support for implementation

Support for implementation was not described in the report.

 

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