WWC review of this study

Impacts of comprehensive teacher induction: Final results from a randomized controlled study (NCEE 2010-4027).

Glazerman, S., Isenberg, E., Dolfin, S., Bleeker, M., Johnson, A., Grider, M., & Jacobus, M. (2010). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED565837

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    464
     Teachers
    , grades
    K-6

Reviewed: February 2018

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Teacher retention outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Teacher retention rate

New Teacher Center Induction Model vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Teachers in schools offering the intervention, a comprehensive teacher induction program, for only one year.;
464 teachers

0.89

0.86

No

--
More Outcomes

Teacher retention: same school

New Teacher Center Induction Model vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Teachers in schools offering the intervention, a comprehensive teacher induction program, for only one year.;
464 teachers

0.54

0.53

No

--

Teacher retention: same district

New Teacher Center Induction Model vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Teachers in schools offering the intervention, a comprehensive teacher induction program, for only one year.;
464 teachers

0.69

0.70

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 87%

  • Urban
  • Race
    White
    76%

Setting

Seventeen school districts in 13 states participated in the study.

Study sample

Elementary schools with 50% or more students qualified for free or reduced price lunch were included in the study. About 76% teachers were non-Hispanic White in Year 1 districts and 45% of teachers were non-Hispanic White in Year 2 districts. Eighty-seven percent were female teachers in Year 1 district and 90% in Year 2 districts. Close to half of the teachers were 20-25 years of age in year 1 (50%) and Year 2 (47%) districts.

Intervention Group

Induction services were provided either by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) or the New Teacher Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz (NTC), depending on the district’s preference. Nine districts used the ETS program and eight used the NTC program. Providers worked with districts to select and train mentors. Beginning teachers in treatment schools were assigned a mentor who worked full time with 12 teachers. Beginning teachers were offered monthly professional development sessions, opportunities to observe veteran teachers, and an end-of-year colloquium. In the second year, programs delivered induction activities to treatment teachers that were similar to those in the first year, but the content was designed to reflect growth of mentors and beginning teachers and changes in their circumstances and needs. In 2-year districts served by ETS, mentors led Teacher Learning Communities, an adaptation of the first year’s study groups that included specific content for each session and a formal structure for teachers to try out approaches to instruction. During second year professional development sessions in the 2-year districts served by NTC, mentors elaborated on standardized topics and designed activities to reflect local needs. After the first year of the program, 94% of beginning teachers in the intervention group reported having a mentor, and spending on average 95 minutes per week in meetings with their mentors.

Comparison Group

After the first year of the program, 83% of beginning teachers in the comparison group reported having a mentor, and spending an average of 74 minutes per week in meetings with their mentors.

Support for implementation

The programs are commercially available and implementation support is provided by ETS and NTC.

Reviewed: July 2015



Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

Reviewed: September 2013

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Teacher retention at the school outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Retention in school

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 3 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
464 students

0.54

0.53

No

--
More Outcomes

Retention in school

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 1 of intervention

All teachers;
882 students

0.75

0.75

No

--

Retention in school

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 2 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
476 students

0.60

0.65

No

--
Teacher retention in the profession outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Retention in teaching profession

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 3 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
464 students

0.89

0.86

No

--
More Outcomes

Retention in teaching profession

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 2 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
476 students

0.90

0.90

No

--

Retention in teaching profession

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 1 of intervention

All teachers;
882 students

0.95

0.95

No

--
Teacher retention in the school district outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Retention in district

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 1 of intervention

All teachers;
882 students

0.86

0.86

No

--
More Outcomes

Retention in district

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 3 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
464 students

0.69

0.70

No

--

Retention in district

Comprehensive Teacher Induction (CTI) vs. Business as usual

After year 2 of intervention

Teachers in districts where a single yr of induction was offered to intervention schools;
476 students

0.79

0.80

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 89%
    Male: 11%

  • Urban
  • Race
    Black
    19%
    Other or unknown
    5%
    White
    61%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    15%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    85%
 

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This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

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