WWC review of this study

The enhanced reading opportunity study final report: The impact of supplemental literacy courses for struggling ninth-grade readers. [Xtreme Reading vs. business as usual]

Somers, M., Corrin, W., Sepanik, S., Salinger, T., Levin, J., & Zmach, C. (2010). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Educational Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED511811

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    2,329
     Students
    , grade
    9

Reviewed: September 2021

No statistically significant positive
findings
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Measures of general reading proficiency and English Language Arts outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Standardized State Test Score

Xtreme Reading vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample: Xtreme Reading schools;
1,191 students

0.10

0.03

No

--
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Standardized State Test Score

Xtreme Reading vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample: Xtreme Reading schools;
1,268 students

0.00

0.01

No

--
Reading Comprehension outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE): Comprehension subtest

Xtreme Reading vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample: Xtreme Reading schools;
2,329 students

90.57

90.00

No

--
Reading vocabulary outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE): Vocabulary subtest

Xtreme Reading vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample: Xtreme Reading schools;
2,329 students

93.95

93.67

No

--


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 50%
    Male: 51%
  • Race
    Black
    46%
    Other or unknown
    38%
    White
    16%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    32%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    68%

Setting

The study occurred in 17 high schools in 10 school districts in the United States. The intervention was implemented in full-year supplementary classes of 12-15 grade 9 students. Each class was taught by a teacher trained to implement the intervention.

Study sample

Approximately 32 percent of the sample was Hispanic, 46 percent were Black and non-Hispanic, 16 percent were White and non-Hispanic, and the remaining 6 percent were of other races and ethnicities. The study sample included approximately equal numbers of male and female students. 67 percent were eligible for free/reduced-price lunch. Nearly half reported a language other than English spoken at home. About 29 percent were considered overage for their grade.

Intervention Group

The study examined the effectiveness of a reading intervention for students struggling with reading. Intervention students participated in the supplementary literacy classes that took place either as a 45-minute daily class or a 75-90 minute class on alternating days. Classes were designed to meet at a minimum of 225 minutes per week. In the first cohort, implementation was delayed and the classes went on for 7.7 months on average. In the second cohort, students participated in the classes for an average of 9.1 months. The lessons followed the Xtreme Reading Curriculum, which provides a prescribed implementation plan, including daily lesson plans.

Comparison Group

Comparison students took the same core courses as intervention students. Instead of intervention classes, comparison students were enrolled in elective courses. Most took elective courses that were not focused on literacy.

Support for implementation

The program provided training to the teachers who were implementing the reading programs as well as to district program coordinators so that they could also provide support for implementation. Teachers attended teacher training institutes, as well as program-specific "booster sessions." The program developers also conducted instructional coaching visits to the teachers' classrooms.

 

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