WWC review of this study

Determining the Impact of a Summer Bridge Program on Academic Success for First-Year College Students

Medina, M.C. (2016). North Carolina State University. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED575902

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    7,770
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: May 2021

At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations
Progressing in college outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
ESSA
rating

Cumulative - Credits earned

Summer bridge programs vs. Business as usual

2 Semesters

Full sample;
7,770 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
13
More Outcomes

Retention to next year of college

Summer bridge programs vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
7,770 students

94.00

96.00

Yes

-3
 
 
Show Supplemental Findings

College Credits Completed - Fall

Summer bridge programs vs. Business as usual

1 Semester

Full sample;
7,770 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

-13
 
 

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 37%
    Male: 63%
  • Race
    Asian
    8%
    Black
    14%
    Native American
    1%
    Not specified
    13%
    White
    64%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    5%
    Not Hispanic
    95%
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    South

Setting

The study was conducted in a public, research-extensive, co-educational, land-grant university in the Southeastern United States. The total undergraduate enrollment during the study period was around 25,000 students.

Study sample

The matched analytic sample was 64% White,14% Black, 8% Asian, and 1% Native American; 5% of students were Hispanic.; and 63% of students were male. The average age of study students was 17.9 years. Approximately one-fifth of students in the matched sample were eligible for a Pell Grant.

Intervention Group

The Summer Bridge Program (SBP) was designed to help first-year students transition from high school to college. SBP took place over a five-week period in the summer before college enrollment. Students lived on campus and participated in interactive events and up to eight credit hours of academic coursework. SBP included a mandatory 1.5 day orientation session similar to the one held for all first-year students. In 2014, SBP hosted 27 optional events on a range of wellness topics including leadership styles, procrastination, financial management, networking, resume writing, healthy cooking and eating, time management, sleep education, study skills, healthy relationships, anxiety and depression awareness, community service projects, crafts, cultural awareness, and fitness activities. SBP students also had access to campus resources such as tutoring, career counseling, physical and mental health services, and recreation facilities. The SBP program staff included student mentors who met one-on-one with their assigned first-year students for 20-30 minutes at least once a week during the program.

Comparison Group

The comparison condition was business as usual. Students received the academic and non-academic services typically provided to first-year students attending this university.

Support for implementation

The budget for the SBP was approximately $186,000. This included a program coordinator salary, graduate assistant stipend, and a $600 stipend and housing for student mentors.

 

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