2016 PI Meeting Agenda

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Presenter
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
In FY 2016, the Institute initiated a new grant program, Research Networks Focused on Critical Problems of Policy and Practice, to focus resources and attention on education problems or issues that are high priority for the nation. The Early Learning Network (ELN) will focus on identifying malleable factors (such as state and local policies, instructional practices, parental support, and others) that are associated with early learning and achievement from preschool through the early elementary school grades. The ELN includes five Research Teams, an Assessment team, and a Network Lead.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Caroline Ebanks, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
1:00 PM - 5:30 PM
This meeting will bring together postdoctoral fellows from NCER and NCSER-funded Postdoctoral Training Programs. In this meeting, fellows will engage in professional development sessions on grant writing and plain language communication. They will, moreover, participate in a training program expo during which they will have an opportunity to share their work and network with other postdoctoral fellows. Fellows will also be able to meet and talk with their program officers and the NCER and NCSER Commissioners.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Corinne Alfeld, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Meredith Larson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
7:30 AM - 3:00 PM
8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
Ruth and Larry will share their perspectives on how IES (and its grantees and contractors) are informing education practice, advancing the field of education research, and communicating the value of IES-supported research. They also will discuss the challenges and opportunities for IES in 2017 and beyond.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Larry Hedges, Northwestern University; Chair, National Board for Education Sciences, Institute of Education Sciences
  • Ruth Curran Nield, Deputy Director for Policy and Research, Delegated Duties of the Director, Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education

MODERATOR(S)

  • Joan McLaughlin, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
9:45 AM - 10:30 AM
NCER Commissioner Thomas Brock will provide an update on NCER’s work, discuss plans for FY 2018, and take questions from grantees.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Thomas Brock, Commissioner, National Center for Education Research (NCER), Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education
NSCER Commissioner Joan McLaughlin will provide an update on NCSER’s work, discuss plans for FY 2018, and take questions from grantees.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Joan McLaughlin, Commissioner, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER), Institute of Education Sciences (IES), U.S. Department of Education
10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
This session will bring together PIs of NCSER-funded Early Career Development and Mentoring grants. Participants will have an opportunity to network with other Early Career PIs and discuss research and training activities under this funding mechanism. Some possible topics to be addressed include making the most of an Early Career grant; transitioning from an Early Career grant to a Special Education Research grant; and managing an Early Career grant. In addition, PIs in the advanced stages of their projects will have a chance to share findings, lessons learned, and tips regarding useful training activities. This meeting is specifically for PIs of NCSER-funded Early Career grants.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
The two Research and Development Centers on Knowledge Utilization—the National Center for Research in Policy and Practice, and the Center for Research Use in Education—were funded to measure and explore the use of research by practitioners at the school and district levels. In this session, representatives will present their initial work on measuring and understanding how schools and districts use research in their decision-making. Presenters will discuss a variety of topics, including the development of measures of research use, results from field tests of the measures, the role of brokers in schools' research use, and research use by leaders in state education agencies.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Elizabeth Farley-Ripple, University of Delaware
  • Caitlin Farrell, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Henry May, University of Delaware
  • William Penuel, University of Colorado Boulder

MODERATOR(S)

  • Rebecca McGill-Wilkinson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Interested in hearing about how researchers have used multiple goals within the IES goal structure to advance their research programs? This panel will consist of four IES-funded researchers who have successfully executed projects across multiple goals. Panelists will provide brief overviews of their projects and explain how they used multiple IES goals to move their research agendas forward. They will share tips and insights to consider when moving between goals. The session will also include time for audience Q&A.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Jeffrey Karpicke, Purdue University
  • Jane Squires, University of Oregon
  • W. Carl Sumi, SRI International
  • Kausalai Wijekumar, Texas A&M University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Erin Higgins, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will focus on the ongoing comparison study as an analytical method that improvement scientists, districts, and states can use to assess the effectiveness of improvement strategies. One presentation will outline the comparative interrupted time series model that is the basis for most ongoing comparison studies, and discuss the process whereby researchers and district leaders co-design such a study. A second presentation will discuss options for embedding smaller quasi-experimental studies within comparison studies to assess relations between particular reform strategies and key outcomes. A third presentation will discuss creative solutions for identifying comparison groups of teachers when conducting pilot and comparison studies. This session should appeal to researchers as well as district and state leaders interested in testing the efficacy of reform strategies when an experimental design is not feasible.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Julian Betts, University of California, San Diego
  • Trey Miller, RAND Corporation
  • Jennifer Russell, University of Pittsburgh

MODERATOR(S)

  • James Benson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
During this session, PIs from the new Pathways to the Education Sciences Research Training Program will meet to discuss the launch of their training programs. Katina Stapleton (IES), Terese Schwartzman (University of Chicago), and Leslie Booren (University of Virginia) will provide tips on training grant management and fellow recruitment.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Leslie Booren, University of Virginia
  • Terese Schwartzman, University of Chicago
  • Katina Stapleton, National Center for Education Research (NCER)

MODERATOR(S)

  • Katina Stapleton, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
In this session, grantees funded through the Statistical and Research Methodology in Education grant program will discuss administrative aspects of grant work, and then talk with each other about their respective projects. This meeting is required for grantees funded under this program.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Allen Ruby, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
The U.S. Department of Education recently released a report that outlines an aspirational vision for STEM education that promotes lifelong learning among all youth and in all communities. Russell Shilling, Executive Director of STEM, will provide an overview. IES researchers will then discuss how their research may help address the STEM 2026 vision, along with potential challenges and solutions for achieving the STEM 2026 vision.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Carole Beal, University of Florida
  • Catherine Lewis, Mills College
  • Jeremy Roschelle, SRI International
  • Russell Shilling, U.S. Department of Education

MODERATOR(S)

  • Christina Chhin, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
While the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was passed in December 2015, the majority of the law will not go into effect until the 2017-2018 school year. In the interim, the Department of Education is working to provide guidance, and States are gearing up for their enhanced role in developing plans that address standards, assessments, and school and district accountability. ESSA also includes an unprecedented emphasis on research and evidence in the design of state policies and programs. In this session, representatives of the Department of Education will provide an overview of ESSA, including how the law will affect students with disabilities. This will be followed by comments and discussion on the implications of the new law for research. The audience will have a chance to ask questions about ESSA and engage in a discussion about new research questions and priorities, including how the research community can support educators in gathering the high-quality evidence now required to choose or design programs.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Emily Anthony, Office of Planning, Evaluation and Policy Development (OPEPD)
  • Thomas Kane, Harvard University Graduate School of Education
  • Ruth Ryder, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)

MODERATOR(S)

  • Corinne Alfeld, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Joan McLaughlin, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
11:45 AM - 12:00 PM
12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Why are main effects so difficult to find in many universal intervention trials? This plenary presentation will highlight the value of universal interventions to improve the educational and social outcomes for students. It will draw on ideas from public health, epidemiology and prevention science to show new and different ways we can conceptualize and appropriately analyze such data.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Mark Greenberg, Pennsylvania State University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Thomas Brock, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
1:15 PM - 1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
This two-part session provides an introduction to adaptive interventions and discusses the potential contribution of this concept to research in education. It also provides an introduction to SMARTs, including design considerations, and examples of SMARTs in education research.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Daniel Amirall, University of Michigan
  • Inbal Nahum-Shani, University of Michigan

MODERATOR(S)

  • Jacquelyn Buckley, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
Regression discontinuity designs (RDDs) are increasingly used in education research to quantify the causal impact of a school-, district-, or state-wide policy change. As with all causal methods, RDDs require meeting certain assumptions, some of which are technical enough to present a challenge for applied researchers. This session will provide an overview of the most basic RDD for researchers less familiar with it, while also giving researchers who have used RDDs information about recent advances in their design and implementation. The session will particularly emphasize recent design elaborations that help researchers meet RDDs’ major assumptions more often, thus making causal inference more secure and general than in the most basic form of RDD.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Thomas Cook, Northwestern University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Vinita Chhabra, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This will be a meeting of NCER-funded early childhood researchers with grants funded under the Early Learning Programs and Policies (ELPP) research topic and the new Early Learning Research Network. Grantees will have an opportunity to discuss their current projects and talk about research and policy initiatives to support children’s learning and development. The meeting will include one or two brief presentations of preliminary findings from current ELPP grants, followed by a group discussion. Researchers will have an opportunity to discuss the implications of the study findings for early childhood policy and practice and future research. Researchers who have early learning projects funded under other research topics and programs such as CASL, CIRE, EdTech, RPPR, and SBIR are welcome to attend.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Caroline Ebanks, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will bring together researchers primarily from the Mathematics and Science Education, and Education Technology Topics in NCER and NCSER. Participants will engage in small group discussions around common challenges to conducting research within these topic areas. Participants will also discuss pressing issues in need of future research. Although this session targets grantees in the topic areas listed above, it is open to all researchers with an interest in mathematics, science, and education technology.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Sarah Brasiel, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
  • Christina Chhin, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Edward Metz, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will feature three Development and Innovation projects that incorporate culture-based strengths and assets in their approach to intervention development and evaluation. Particular attention will be given to the role of researcher-community collaboration in intervention research, and strategies to implement and sustain interventions in culturally diverse contexts.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Steve Amendum, University of Delaware
  • Leslie Babinski, Duke University
  • Catherine Bradshaw, University of Virginia
  • Katrina Debnam, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Charles Martinez, University of Oregon
  • Marta Sanchez, University of North Carolina at Wilmington

MODERATOR(S)

  • Emily Doolittle, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
The purpose of this session is to provide curriculum developers, evaluators and researchers with a framework for how to think about the assessments they should use in their projects. To provide a background to the session, we will explore the concepts of distal and proximal measures, and place them in the context of validation of an assessment. We will survey the typical use of outcome assessments in IES research projects, focusing on the common use of distal tests (usually in the form of standardized tests), and discuss the consequences of such choices. We will discuss scientific and ethical grounds for choosing distal and proximal assessments, from both the developer and evaluator points of view, and describe a generalized approach to both developing and evaluating assessments will be described. We will use examples from R&D and evaluation studies funded by IES and other funding agencies.

PRESENTER(S)

  • William Penuel, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Josh Sussman, University of California, Berkeley
  • Mark Wilson, University of California, Berkeley

MODERATOR(S)

  • Wai Chow, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
In this special, required session for the PIs of training grants (or their representatives), we will discuss topics relevant to the training of current and future education and special education researchers. Topics may include: creative ways to build capacity to conduct the type of work funded through the IES goal structure; strategies to support researcher-practitioner partnerships; preparing early career researchers to engage in all aspects of the research process (e.g., project management, partnerships, budgets); and lessons learned and tips for trainers.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Corinne Alfeld, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Meredith Larson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Katina Stapleton, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
Part 1 (1:30 - 2:15): This session will bring together researchers with NCSER-funded projects in the Transition Outcomes for Secondary Students with Disabilities topic area.

Part 2 (2:15 - 3:00): This session will bring together researchers with NCSER-funded projects in the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) topic area.

In each part of this meeting, participants will engage in discussions around common challenges to conducting research within this topic area (e.g., recruiting, obtaining/maintaining samples, disseminating findings). Participants will discuss critical issues for future research in this area and provide general feedback on this topic and recommendations (e.g., things that have worked well, ways to improve). All researchers with an interest in these topics may attend this meeting, and participants will have the opportunity to network with each other.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Kimberly Sprague, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
3:15 PM - 4:15 PM
This two-part session provides an introduction to adaptive interventions and discusses the potential contribution of this concept to research in education. It also provides an introduction to SMARTs, including design considerations, and examples of SMARTs in education research.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Daniel Amirall, University of Michigan
  • Inbal Nahum-Shani, University of Michigan

MODERATOR(S)

  • Jacquelyn Buckley, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
This session will present two interrelated efforts to increase the transparency, rigor, and accountability surrounding efficacy trials in education research. First, a group of researchers associated with the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE) will present their work to develop a registry for randomized control trials (RCTs) in education. When completed, the searchable registry will provide a tool for researchers to keep abreast of studies that are planned or in progress, find instruments used in other studies, and obtain ideas about study design and methodology. A second presentation will discuss complementary work by the What Works Clearinghouse to develop a searchable database of completed RCT studies and evaluations thereof.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Rebecca Maynard, University of Pennsylvania
  • Jessaca Spybrook, Western Michigan University
  • Chris Weiss, National Center for Education Evaluation (NCEE)

MODERATOR(S)

  • Thomas Brock, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will bring together researchers funded through the NCSER Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education program. Participants will engage in discussions about research in this topic area, including challenges and barriers to conducting research and critical issues for future research. This session is open to anyone interested in early intervention research.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Amy Sussman, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
This session will bring together researchers funded through the NCER English Learners topic to discuss challenges and opportunities in their work studying ELs. Colleagues from the Office of English Language Acquisition will provide some policy-related commentary and field-generated recommendations, after which the EL PIs will have an opportunity to discuss their work with other investigators who are studying similar contexts or topics (e.g., high school ELs, writing, policy, etc.).

PRESENTER(S)

  • Supreet Anand, Office of English Language Acquisition
  • Libia Gill , Office of English Language Acquisition

MODERATOR(S)

  • Molly Faulkner-Bond, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Learn about IES/ED public access requirements and the steps that you as a grantee need to take to comply with them. This session will provide a context for public access, highlight the successes and challenges that IES has encountered in implementing its policies, and identify ways grantees can streamline the requirements they need to meet.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Elizabeth Albro, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Kimberly Sprague, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
  • Pamela Tripp-Melby, National Library of Education/ ERIC

MODERATOR(S)

  • Elizabeth Albro, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will bring together researchers focused on policy and systems research (e.g., research focused on solving problems facing schools, districts, and/or states), including researcher-practitioner partnerships, to discuss the challenges of conducting research on complex systems in a changing policy environment.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Corinne Alfeld, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Allen Ruby, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
In this session, the joint recipients of the IES Outstanding Predoctoral Fellow award, Meghan McCormick and Eric Taylor, will discuss strategies for conducting education research that is responsive to policy and practice. Meghan completed her Ph.D. in Applied Psychology at New York University and wrote her dissertation on the efficacy of INSIGHTS, a social/behavioral learning intervention aimed at improving low-income urban students’ academic achievement. Eric Taylor completed his Ph.D. in the Economics of Education at Stanford University and wrote his dissertation about how the quality and quantity of classroom instruction contributes to student learning. Scott Solberg will serve as discussant. Scott is the PI of an IES-funded training program that forges alliances between researchers and policymakers in the use and interpretation of data and evidence to guide decision-making and improve student outcomes.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Megan McCormick, MDRC
  • Scott Solberg, Boston University
  • Eric Taylor, Harvard University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Katina Stapleton, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Strong project management skills and positive, productive relationships with all stakeholders are key components of successful projects. This session is designed to support Principal Investigators of Early Career awards as well as first-time grant recipients interested in learning more about respectful, responsible inquiry. Participants will learn about tips for success from investigators who have successfully received and executed IES grants. Topics to be addressed include: assembling strong recipients interested in learning more about respectful, responsible inquiry. Participants will learn about tips for success from investigators who have successfully received and executed IES grants. Some topics to be addressed include: assembling strong research teams; project management activities; fostering positive relationships; fiscal integrity; communication with your program officer; and dissemination strategies.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Marcia Barnes, University of Texas at Austin
  • Cynthia Puranik, Georgia State University
  • Patricia Snyder, University of Florida
  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)

MODERATOR(S)

  • Kathleen Lane, University of Kansas
4:15 PM - 5:45 PM
The poster session is intended to provide an interactive forum in which researchers can present and discuss work funded by the National Center for Education Research (NCER), the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER), and the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. This year’s poster session will also feature a limited number of interactive technology demonstrations, as well as quasi-structured opportunities for networking with other attendees.
7:30 AM - 1:00 PM
8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Leading methodological researchers will showcase the cutting-edge statistical software they are developing as part of their IES grant work. This session also provides a forum in which methodological researchers can discuss technical aspects of statistical software development with one another.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Edward Metz, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will focus on research-in-progress aimed at developing and evaluating strategies for assisting students in completing college degrees. Two presenters will report on projects funded through the College Completion Network. One will focus on information, reminders, and assistance delivered via electronic messaging as a strategy for ensuring that students who have completed half of their required credits follow through and complete their degrees. The other presenter will focus on a bundle of supports contained within the University System of Georgia’s African-American Male Initiative, an effort to boost degree completion among Black male undergraduates. A third presenter will report on the follow-up study of CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP), which is evaluating the long-term impacts of this bundled program that aims to move CUNY students quickly to Associate degree completion. A fourth presenter will report on the relative contributions of information and assistance to college students’ success.
This session will be of interest to all researchers interested in looking beyond college enrollment to college completion.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Eric Bettinger, Stanford University
  • Benjamin Castleman, University of Virginia
  • Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, MDRC
  • Michael Weiss, MDRC

MODERATOR(S)

  • James Benson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Many of us are interested in impacting the world of practice and parenting with our findings. This session is for those who don't know where to begin but want to learn how to get their message out. In this PD session, a social media expert and practicing education researchers will discuss the process of writing and communicating for the public in a way that retains the nuance and fundamental meaning of scientific research. The speakers will explain how to translate research findings into usable knowledge that will help teachers, parents, students, and others better understand and use the research. They will also address the challenge of transitioning from the laboratory and other controlled settings to the real world. Key topics may include: developing a social media strategy for dissemination, distilling research findings into key messages, providing an overview of social media tools and tips on how to get the most out of each social network, or offering platforms for sharing long form vs. short form content. This will be an interactive session where participants have the chance to see social media tools in action and ask questions.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Susan Dynarski, University of Michigan
  • Roberta Golinkoff, University of Delaware
  • Dana Tofig, Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

MODERATOR(S)

  • Meredith Larson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) are designed to meet a range of student needs though a framework of data-based problem solving and a continuum of evidence-based practices to support students’ academic and behavioral needs. However, there are a number of students with severe and persistent learning or behavioral needs who may not respond positively to initial interventions. They need additional support to learn not only academic content, but the social and behavioral skills needed to succeed in school. How to increase the support or intensity of the intervention is at the heart of much of the research NCSER supports. In this session, researchers will discuss the progress the field has made toward developing and evaluating intensive interventions with which to improve student education outcomes; the role of intensive interventions in the context of a larger system of support; and the knowledge and skills teachers need to implement these interventions.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Stephanie Al Otaiba, Southern Methodist University
  • Theodore Christ, University of Minnesota
  • Douglas Fuchs, Vanderbilt University
  • Lynn Fuchs, Vanderbilt University
  • Howard Goldstein, University of South Florida
  • Robert Horner, University of Oregon
  • Susan Sheridan, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

MODERATOR(S)

  • Kathleen Lane, University of Kansas
  • Joan McLaughlin, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
In 2010, IES made a major investment in building a network of researchers to study how to improve reading comprehension across the grade span. What worked, what didn’t, and what are some promising paths forward in building new interventions and assessments? Researchers from four of the Reading for Understanding teams will present highlights from their intervention and assessment studies over the last six years. The session will conclude with time for discussion with attendees.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Carol Connor, University of California, Irvine
  • Laura Justice, Ohio State University
  • Tenaha O'Reilly, Educational Testing Service
  • Sharon Vaughn, The University of Texas at Austin

MODERATOR(S)

  • Karen Douglas, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Rebecca McGill-Wilkinson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine welcome all attendees interested in discussing critical issues facing graduate education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The National Academies seeks input to inform a consensus study that will examine ways in which a) students are prepared for careers both in and outside of academia; b) the extent to which students gain the range and depth of research experiences they need to thrive in both non-academic and academic careers; c) the extent to which the breadth of their graduate-level education prepares them to be adaptable, lifelong teachers and learners; and d) the extent to which they are able to apply their knowledge and skills to real-world scenarios through internships, traineeships, and other work-based learning opportunities. In addition to building an understanding of the current STEM graduate education context and issues, the National Academies invites individuals to share questions and thoughts that pertain to the future, and address how the nature of STEM graduate education and the workforce are changing both within and among disciplines.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Thomas Rudin, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
  • Layne Scherer, Board on Higher Education and Workforce, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

MODERATOR(S)

  • Katina Stapleton, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session covers selected topics that are taught in the methods training course on cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost analysis. It will provide an overview of the “ingredients method,” and focus on examples of recent developments in economic evaluation for researchers to consider as they conduct their own work.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Brooks Bowden, North Carolina State University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Wendy Wei, National Center for Education Research (NCER) and National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
This session will focus on research and funding opportunities for researchers interested in working with data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), known as the nation’s report card. Researchers from the National Center for Education Statistics will provide information about upcoming funding opportunities to use NAEP data, and discuss how NAEP data might be leveraged for research under IES funding competitions. The presentation will also include an NCER researcher who has successfully combined NAEP data with data from other sources in the past, with the intent of exploring substantive research questions about mathematics teaching and learning.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Lauren Harrell, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
  • Sarah Lubienski, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

MODERATOR(S)

  • Molly Faulkner-Bond, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
9:45 AM - 11:15 AM
Specifying a clear framework that connects the research questions, study design, data collection, and interpretation of findings enhances Education Research and Development. Evidence-Centered Design (ECD) is a family of representations and processes that has been used to create and justify assessments with respect to their intended purposes. ECD uses a set of connected models: a student model of the set of competencies or learning goals; evidence models of the sets of observations used to make inferences about the competencies or goals; and task models of the sets of characteristics that activities need to elicit the human behaviors that enable the observations. Although ECD was developed for use in designing assessments, it also has utility in other research enterprises. In this workshop, the presenters will describe ECD and show how it can be applied more broadly to different use cases that are common within the IES goal system, for example, using ECD to inform 1) the selection of measures used to identify malleable factors in goal one studies; 2) the design of interventions to satisfy learning goals, and the selection and/or creation of instruments for use in pilot studies common to goal two; 3) the selection of the mix of instruments needed to provide needed evidence to support claims in efficacy and scaling studies for goals three and four; and 4) the creation of assessments for goal five. The workshop will include collaborative group work to give researchers a taste of how ECD works for different use cases.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Malcolm Bauer, Educational Testing Service
  • Robert Mislevy, Educational Testing Service

MODERATOR(S)

  • Karen Douglas, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
The purpose of this session will be to showcase and stimulate discussion about technology-based innovations in IES-funded research. In this format, presenters will provide brief demos (3-4 minutes) of technology-enhanced assessments, games, instructional tools, etc., that they have developed in their work. Following the demos and presentation, a facilitator will lead the presenters and audience in a rich dialogue about topics related to the use of technology in research. The audience will have an opportunity to ask questions about how such technology is developed and whether it affords advantages over other ways to do research.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Carolyn Brown, Foundations in Learning
  • Kara Carpenter, Teachley
  • Roberta Golinkoff, University of Delaware
  • Ben Grimley, Speak Agent
  • John Krajewski, Strange Loop Games
  • Brooke Morrill, Schell Games
  • Patti Smith, Querium
  • Randy Weiner, BrainQuake

MODERATOR(S)

  • Roberta Golinkoff, University of Delaware
The replication of research findings is critical for establishing and advancing scientific knowledge, as it can provide confirmation of, and build confidence in, research findings, and generate evidence for their generalizability to different contexts and populations. Recently, replication has received increased attention due in part to the seemingly limited number of replication studies and the difficulty of reproducing original findings. In this session, participants will hear from researchers who have conducted replication studies. Topics to be addressed include: variations in replication; design and implementation considerations for replications; challenges to conducting replications; leveraging replication research to better understand why an intervention works, and for whom and under what conditions; strategies for building replication opportunities into proposed or existing efficacy projects; and recommendations for replication research.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Ben Clarke, University of Oregon
  • Michael Coyne, University of Connecticut
  • Christian Doabler, University of Oregon
  • Christopher Lemons, Vanderbilt University
  • John Pane, RAND Corporation
  • Howard Wills, University of Kansas

MODERATOR(S)

  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
In 2014, IES funded a Research and Development (R&D) Center to study the implementation and effectiveness of college- and career-ready standards. The Center on Standards, Alignment, Instruction and Learning (C-SAIL) will present early findings from its implementation, longitudinal outcomes, and measurement studies, including differences in results for English language learners and students with disabilities. The implementation study team will draw on data from state- and district-level interviews as well as district, principal, and teacher surveys, to portray the nature and quality of implementation for five partner states (California, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Ohio and Texas). The team will also present policy maps for all 50 states to display similarities and differences in states’ approaches to implementing college- and career-ready standards within the context of ESSA replacing NCLB and emerging resistance to the Common Core State Standards. The longitudinal studies team will present estimates of state policy effects on student learning in English language arts and mathematics, as measured by NAEP scores. The measurement team will summarize its work revising the Surveys of Enacted Curriculum instruments, and discuss availability of the instruments to other researchers.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Laura Desimone, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education
  • Nelson Flores, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education
  • Lynn Fuchs, Vanderbilt University
  • Katherine Pac, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education
  • Morgan Polikoff, University of Southern California
  • Andrew Porter, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education
  • Mengli Song, American Institutes for Research

MODERATOR(S)

  • James Benson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
The Low-Cost, Short-Duration Evaluation of Education Interventions grant program is designed to support rigorous evaluations of education interventions that state or local education agencies expect to produce meaningful improvements in student education outcomes within a short period (for example, within a single semester or academic year). The purpose of this session is to: (1) introduce this competition and its purpose and focus; (2) discuss the methods for conducting this research; and, (3) encourage future applications from partnerships. Speakers include NCER and NCSER funded teams that are currently implementing these projects and they will provide their unique prospective on district and researcher partnerships to conduct this work.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Naihobe Gonzalez, Mathematica Policy Research
  • Sam Quinney, Office of the City Administrator, District of Columbia 
  • Karrie Shogren, University of Kansas
  • Michael Wehmeyer, University of Kansas
  • Jean Wing, Oakland Unified School District

MODERATOR(S)

  • Kimberly Sprague, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
This session will bring together researchers primarily from the Reading and Writing Topic in NCER and Reading, Writing, and Language Development Topic in NCSER. Participants will engage in small group discussions around common challenges to conducting research at different time points of a study. Participants may share strategies for recruitment, data management, dissemination, etc. The session is open to all researchers with funded projects related to reading, writing, and language development.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Sarah Brasiel, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
  • Rebecca McGill-Wilkinson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
*This session will begin with a brief 15-minute memorial tribute to William Shadish, who passed away in March 2016. Will made many contributions to the field of experimental and quasi-experimental research methodology, and was the Principal Investigator on two IES grants to advance single-case design methods. All attendees are welcome to attend the first portion of this session to hear remarks from colleagues Tom Cook and Rob Horner about Will’s contributions to the field, and from Will’s student James Pustejovsky about his mentorship.

Single-case design (SCD) is not reserved exclusively for research on low-incidence populations. This experimental methodology can be used effectively to enhance projects within a variety of research goals on any population. This session will begin with a brief introduction to SCD for those who have never used it. The presenters will then describe ways in which this method can be used to enhance research by providing in-depth information that increases our understanding of effects and mechanisms. Examples of how SCD is being used in IES-funded research under a variety of goals will be discussed.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Robert Horner, University of Oregon
  • Ann Kaiser, Vanderbilt University
  • James Pustejovksy, University of Texas, Austin

MODERATOR(S)

  • Amy Sussman, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
This meeting will provide an opportunity for researchers funded under the Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning program in NCER and the Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning program in NCSER to share challenges and solutions associated with conducting social, emotional, and behavioral research in schools. Grantees will also share their thoughts on pressing issues in the field of social/behavioral research. All researchers interested in learning more about how to conduct research to support social behavioral skills and outcomes are welcome.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Jacquelyn Buckley, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
  • Emily Doolittle, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
11:15 AM - 11:30 AM
11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Effective science communication is necessary in fostering ongoing conversations between scientists, policy makers, and the general public, as well as promoting science literacy. The ability to communicate directly and vividly can help with securing funding, collaborating across disciplines, and strengthening research. The challenge is for scientists to be clear and engaging without oversimplifying the science.  This interactive presentation suggests tools and examples to help scientists communicate in ways that resonate with people outside of their field about what they do and why it matters. We will cover general principles in how to craft sort, clear, conversational statements, and avoid jargon.  Participants will be actively engaged in explaining scientific material to lay people to develop and practice clarity in speaking to non-scientists about their work.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Christine O'Connell, Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science

MODERATOR(S)

  • Joan McLaughlin, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
1:00 PM - 1:15 PM
1:15 PM - 2:15 PM
Researchers who focus on adult learners with low skills and those interested in research for this important population are invited to join this informal session that brings together currently funded researchers. The session will include updates on research projects and a discussion about possible trends for research needs and about how to build this research field.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Meredith Larson, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will bring together researchers with projects funded through the Cognition and Student Learning program. Participants will engage in small group discussions around common challenges to conducting research in this topic area. Participants will also discuss pressing issues in need of future research in this area. All researchers interested in the Cognition and Student Learning program are welcome to attend.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Erin Higgins, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
This session will focus on the research and development of game-based learning interventions, offering perspectives from both researchers and developers. The discussion will center on the benefits and challenges of game developer-researcher collaborations. Panelists will talk about their role and perspective in the partnership and development process - i.e., what kind of partnership they established (e.g., educational research agencies vs. university partnerships), what kind of expertise each party brings to the table, and the challenges and opportunities one encounters in working with people from different fields. In addition, the panelists will share tips and strategies for forging a successful developer-researcher collaboration, based on their experiences.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Jay Connor, Learning Ovations
  • Keith Devlin, BrainQuake
  • Hank Fien, University of Oregon Center for Teaching and Learning

MODERATOR(S)

  • Grace Wardhana, Kiko Labs
This session will bring together researchers with NCSER-funded projects in the Professional Development for Teachers and Related Services Providers topic, and researchers with NCER-funded projects in the Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching topic. Participants will have an opportunity to network and discuss common themes and challenges to conducting research in these areas, including: transitioning from a Goal 2 Development study to a Goal 3 Efficacy study; defining and measuring the knowledge, skills, and practices of teachers, related services providers, and other instructional personnel; examining the active ingredients of interventions for these instructional personnel and the relation between these active ingredients and outcomes for teachers and students; individualizing these interventions; and conducting research in educational settings. All researchers with an interest in studying teachers, related services providers, and/or other instructional personnel are invited to participate in this meeting.

MODERATOR(S)

  • Wai Chow, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Katherine Taylor, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
Under the Researcher-Practitioner in Education Research grant program, partnerships between research institutions and state and local education agencies carry out research and plan for future research on an issue of high priority to the agency. In this session, researchers and agency personnel will discuss how their partnerships carried out their research, the findings from that research, and how the partners jointly planned future research to continue after the grant ended.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Alexandra Kistner, American Institutes for Research
  • Kathleen Lane, University of Kansas
  • Stephanie Marek, Boston Public Schools
  • Martha Martinez, Oregon Department of Education
  • Leah Wisdom, Lawrence Public Schools
  • Karen Thompson, Oregon State University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Allen Ruby, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
Across the two Research Centers, the Institute has funded nine projects related to the development, validation, and use of technology with the Individual Growth and Development Indicators assessment system. The Institute has supported research to develop and validate IGDIs for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers both English-and Spanish-speaking through a Research and Development Center, five Measurement grants, one Efficacy study, one Development grant, and an SBIR project. The presenters will provide an overview of IES-funded IGDIs projects, describe their research, and discuss the development, validation, and dissemination of measurement tools to assess and support young children’s learning and development.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Jay Buzhardt, University of Kansas
  • Judith Carta, University of Kansas
  • Charles Greenwood, University of Kansas
  • Scott McConnell, University of Minnesota
  • Alisha Wackerle-Hollman, University of Minnesota
  • Dale Walker, University of Kansas

MODERATOR(S)

  • Caroline Ebanks, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Amy Sussman, National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER)
We have all had experience with FERPA (the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act), IRBs (Institutional Review Boards) and state, district, and/or school data access and privacy policies. Just when we think we know how to navigate these to obtain the data we need for our research, the endeavor is becoming more challenging. State legislatures in 2016 considered 185 bills on student privacy, many with significant new language and protections for students. The reauthorization of the Education Science Reform Act (ESRA), to be called Strengthening Education through Research (SETRA) Act, is currently held up in Congress due to concerns over updating FERPA. Researchers need to know what the laws are, how to comply with them and still gain access to the data we need and, most importantly, how to clearly communicate the purpose of our research to educators and parents to make our case for the importance of data use to improve education for students.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Elizabeth Albro, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
  • Rachel Anderson, Data Quality Campaign
  • Shane Morrissey, Privacy Technical Assistance Center, U.S. Department of Education
  • Amelia Vance, Policy Counsel for Education at the Future of Privacy Forum

MODERATOR(S)

  • Corinne Alfeld, National Center for Education Research (NCER)
2:15 PM - 2:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Within a well-designed graph or data visualization, the eyes can be a powerful tool for understanding patterns in data. But within a poorly-designed depiction of the same data, these same tasks can be inefficient or even overwhelming. This plenary workshop will combine an overview of data visualization techniques with hands-on exercises that illustrate how to present your data clearly to both your research colleagues and non-technical audiences.

PRESENTER(S)

  • Steven Franconeri, Northwestern University

MODERATOR(S)

  • Thomas Brock, National Center for Education Research (NCER)