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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2020012 2019 NAEP Mathematics and Reading Assessments: Highlighted Results at Grades 4 and 8 for the Nation, States, and Districts

These online Highlights present overviews of results from the NAEP 2019 mathematics report and the 2019 reading report. Highlighted results include key findings for the nation, states/jurisdictions, and the 27 districts that participated in the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) at grades 4 and 8. Results are presented in terms of average scale scores and as percentages of students performing at the three NAEP achievement levels: NAEP Basic, NAEP Proficient, and NAEP Advanced. Highlighted results include performance data for demographic student groups, five selected percentiles, and NAEP survey questionnaires.

The 2019 average scores were higher for grade 4 mathematics, lower for grade 8 mathematics, and lower at both grades for reading compared to averages scores in 2017. Over the long term, however, the national average scores in both subjects were higher for both grades compared to the initial assessment years (1990 for mathematics and 1992 for reading). At the state level, average mathematics scores were mainly steady across states/jurisdictions at both grades since 2017: at grade 4, scores were higher in nine and lower in 3 states/jurisdictions. Average reading scores were lower compared to 2017 in 17 states/jurisdictions at grade 4 and in 31 states/jurisdictions at grade 8; one state/jurisdiction at each grade had a score increase since 2017.

Average mathematics and reading scores across the participating TUDA districts were relatively stable since 2017: mathematics scores increased in five TUDA districts at grade 4 and in four districts at grade 8; one district at grade 4 and three districts at grade 8 had lower mathematics scores since 2017. Only one TUDA district had a higher reading score in 2019 compared to 2017. Reading scores were lower compared in 2017 in three districts at grade 4 and in 11 districts at grade 8.

Highlighted results include responses of students and teachers to survey questionnaires designed to collect information about students’ educational experiences and opportunities to learn both in and outside of the classroom.

Full results for each subject are available in the 2019 NAEP Mathematics Report and the 2019 NAEP Reading Report.

10/30/2019
NCES 2019040 Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto the NAEP Scales: Results From the 2017 NAEP Reading and Mathematics Assessments
The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has periodically published reports using results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) to compare the proficiency standards that states set for their students. Since standards vary across states, the results of the various state assessments cannot be used to directly compare students’ progress. However, by placing a state standard onto the NAEP scale, a common metric for all states, a NAEP equivalent score is produced, which can be compared across states. The last mapping study report released by NCES (NCES 2018-159) compared state proficiency standards for school year 2014-15. The 2017 edition of this report highlights the results of mapping state proficiency standards onto the NAEP scales using state assessment results from the 2016–17 school year and the 2017 NAEP assessments for public schools.
8/21/2019
NCES 2018147 2015 Survey Questionnaires Results: Classroom Instructions for Mathematics, Reading, and Science
As part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students, teachers, and school administrators answer survey questionnaires. These questionnaires collect contextual information to provide a better understanding of educational experiences and factors that are related to students’ learning both in and outside of the classroom and to allow for meaningful student group comparisons. As part of the 2015 NAEP assessments, teachers of fourth- and eighth-graders answered survey questions about the content, activities, and skills they emphasized in their classrooms, and twelfth-graders answered questions about their classroom activities or coursework in mathematics, reading, and science. This special report takes an in-depth look at their responses, providing additional information with the 2015 NAEP achievement results.
7/30/2019
NCES 2019016 Study of the Title I, Part A Grant Program Mathematical Formulas
Study of the Title I, Part A Grant Program Mathematical Formulas examines the distribution of Title I funds to understand how the current formulas affect various types of districts, such as large or small districts, those in poor or rich areas, and those in urban or rural areas. The report compares districts across the 12 NCES geographic locales, ranging from large cities to remote rural areas.
5/8/2019
NCES 2019048 The National Indian Education Study 2015: A Closer Look

The National Indian Education Study (NIES) is designed to describe the condition of education for fourth- and eighth-grade American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students in the United States. NIES is conducted under the direction of the National Center for Education Statistics on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Indian Education.

This follow-up report focuses on two major concerns that have been raised throughout the first decade of NIES:

  • What contextual factors are associated with higher- and lower-performing AI/AN students on NAEP mathematics and reading assessments?
  • How do AI/AN students see themselves in terms of their Native languages, culture, and aspirations for the future?

First, the report examines various factors associated with AI/AN students who performed at or above the 75th percentile and below the 25th percentile (i.e., “higher-performing” and “lower-performing” AI/AN students). Second, the report explores results derived from the combination of multiple related survey questions (i.e., composite variables) centered around Native language exposure, knowledge and interest in Native cultures, and academic engagement and expectations.

The results presented in this report are focused on the responses of fourth- and eighth-grade AI/AN students to selected survey questions. Approximately 8,500 fourth-graders and 8,200 eighth-graders participated in the NIES 2015 student survey. The survey results displayed are reported as percentages of AI/AN students attending schools that varied in the proportion of AI/AN students within their student population—low AI/AN density public schools (less than 25 percent of students were AI/AN), high AI/AN density public schools (25 percent or more of students were AI/AN), or Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools.

5/7/2019
NCES 2019068 The Nation's Report Card: Highlighted Results for the 2018 Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) Assessment at Grade 8

This online highlights presents an overview of results from the NAEP 2018 Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) report. The report includes national results on the performance of eighth-grade students. Results are presented in terms of average scale scores and as percentages of students performing at or above the three NAEP achievement levels: NAEP Basic, NAEP Proficient, and NAEP Advanced. In addition to overall scores, results are reported by racial/ethnic groups, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups.

In 2018, eighth-grade students scored higher on average in TEL overall compared to 2014, the previous assessment year. Average scores were also higher in all three TEL content areas (Technology and Society, Design and Systems, and Information and Communication Technology) and in all three TEL practices (Understanding Technological Principles, Developing Solutions and Achieving Goals, and Communicating and Collaborating). Compared to 2014, overall TEL scores in 2018 were higher for middle- (50th percentile) and higher- (75th and 90th percentiles) performing eighth-grade students; middle- and higher-performing students also scored higher in all three content areas and all three practices. In 2018, scores for several student groups were higher in TEL overall as well as in each of the content areas and practices in comparison to 2014. Female students scored higher than male students in TEL overall in 2018; female students also scored higher than their male peers in more content areas and practices compared to 2014.

Results are also reported based on students’ responses to a survey questionnaire about their technology and engineering learning experiences in and outside of school. The report includes detailed descriptions of released scenario-based tasks and discrete questions to help illustrate the types of technology and engineering skills measured as part of the NAEP TEL assessment.

Full results are available in the 2018 NAEP Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) Report Card.

4/30/2019
NCES 2018148 2015 Survey Questionnaires Results: Students’ Computer Access and Use
As part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students, teachers, and school administrators answer survey questionnaires. These questionnaires collect contextual information to provide a better understanding of educational experiences and factors that are related to students’ learning both in and outside of the classroom and to allow for meaningful student group comparisons. For the 2015 NAEP mathematics and reading assessments, nationally representative samples of students answered a survey question about their access to computers at home, and their teachers answered a survey question about the availability of computers for them and their students in school. Additionally, students and teachers answered questions about their use of computers for classroom learning and instruction. This report, the second in a series, takes an in-depth look at their responses, providing additional information with the 2015 NAEP achievement results.
9/17/2018
NCES 2018118 Paths Through Mathematics and Science: Patterns and Relationships in High School Coursetaking
This report examines mathematics and science coursetaking in high school by providing a description of coursetaking within each of the mathematics and science subject areas in ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades, as well as by showing the association between early mathematics coursetaking and subsequent science coursetaking.

The report also describes coursetaking in engineering and technology, and the associations between coursetaking in these subject areas and in mathematics and science. The results are based on 2009 high school transcripts that are linked to 2009 NAEP mathematics and science 12th grade assessments.
6/19/2018
NCES 2018155 2015 Survey Questionnaires Results: Students’ Views of Mathematics, Reading, and Science
As part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), students, teachers, and school administrators answer survey questionnaires. These questionnaires collect contextual information to provide a better understanding of educational experiences and factors that are related to students’ learning both in and outside of the classroom and to allow for meaningful student group comparisons. For the 2015 NAEP mathematics, reading, and science assessments, nationally representative samples of students at grades 4, 8, and 12 answered survey questions about their views (i.e., levels of interest and enjoyment) of subject-related topics and activities. This report, the first in a series, takes an in-depth look at their responses, providing additional information with the 2015 NAEP achievement results.
6/12/2018
NCES 2018159 Mapping State Proficiency Standards Onto the NAEP Scales: Results From the 2015 NAEP Reading and Mathematics Assessments
During the past 13 years, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has published reports in which the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is used for comparing the proficiency standards that students have to meet in each state. This sixth report highlights results of mapping state proficiency standards onto the NAEP scales using state assessment results for public schools from the 2014–15 school year and the 2015 NAEP assessments. The report focuses on the reading and mathematics standards that states set for grades 4 and 8 for federal reporting under the 2001 and 2015 reauthorizations of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. By placing standards onto the NAEP scales, a common metric to all states, it is possible to compare the standards that students are expected to meet in each state.
5/31/2018
NCES 2018037 2017 NAEP Mathematics and Reading Assessments: Highlighted Results at Grades 4 and 8 for the Nation, States, and Districts

This online Highlights presents an overview of results from the NAEP 2017 mathematics and reading reports. Highlighted results include key findings for the nation, states/jurisdictions, and 27 districts that participated in the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in mathematics and reading at grades 4 and 8. Results are presented in terms of average scale scores and as percentages of students performing at the three NAEP achievement levels: Basic, Proficient, and Advanced. Highlighted results are presented for key demographic student groups, and student group score gaps at the national, state, and district level.

The 2017 average reading score for the nation increased at grade 8 compared to 2015; there were no changes for reading at grade 4, or mathematics at either grade. Over the long term, however, the national average mathematics and reading scores were higher for both grades in 2017 compared to the initial assessment years in both subjects (1990 for mathematics and 1992 for reading). The 2017 average scores for states in reading showed no state scoring higher in comparison to 2015 at grade 4 and nine states scoring lower. At grade 8, the 2017 reading results showed 10 states/jurisdictions scoring higher compared to 2015 and one state scoring lower. At grade 4 mathematics, the 2017 results showed that two states/jurisdictions scored higher and 10 states scored lower compared to 2015; at grade 8, two states/jurisdictions scored higher and three states scored lower.

Of the districts that participated in both 2015 and 2017, reading scores were higher in one district at grade 4 and in two districts at grade 8 in comparison to 2015, while most districts showed no significant change in scores. In mathematics, at grade 4, scores increased in four TUDA districts and decreased in four districts. There were no significant changes in eighth-grade mathematics scores for most TUDA districts; one district scored lower in comparison to 2015.

Full results for each subject are available in the 2017 NAEP Mathematics Report Card and the 2017 NAEP Reading Report Card.
4/10/2018
NCES 2017098 Student Access to Digital Learning Resources Outside of the Classroom
Student Access to Digital Learning Resources Outside of the Classroom draws upon nationally representative data sources, existing research, and relevant state and local intervention efforts to examine the five research areas designated in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and to provide a comprehensive picture of student access to digital learning resources outside of the classroom.
4/4/2018
NCES 2018017 Reading Achievement of U.S. Fourth-Grade Students in an International Context
The Progress In International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2016 is the fourth administration of this international comparison since the initial administration in 2001. PIRLS is used to compare over time the reading skills of 4th-grade students and is designed to align broadly with reading curricula in the participating countries. The results, therefore, suggest the degree to which students have learned the reading concepts and skills likely to have been taught in school. In 2016, there were 58 education systems (including countries and other education systems) that participated at grade 4.

The focus of the report is on the performance of U.S. students relative to their peers in other education systems in 2016, and on changes in reading achievement since 2001. For a number of participating education systems, changes in achievement can be documented over the last 15 years, from 2001 to 2016.

In addition to framing the reading literacy of U.S. students within an international context, the report shows how the reading literacy of U.S. 4th-graders varies by student background characteristics and contextual factors that may be associated with reading proficiency. Following the presentation of results, a technical appendix describes the study design, data collection, and analysis procedures that guided the administration of PIRLS 2016 in the United States and in the other participating education systems.

Also included are results from ePIRLS an innovative, computer-based assessment of online reading. This was the first administration of ePIRLS.
12/5/2017
NCES 2017437 Early Millennials: The Sophomore Class of 2002 a Decade Later
This Statistical Analysis Report examines the early adulthood milestones of 2002 high school sophomores as of 2012. It reports on key outcomes, including high school completion, enrollment in postsecondary education, progress toward or completion of a college degree, family formation (marriage and having children), and employment status and earnings. The analysis of key postsecondary education and employment milestones control for demographic and high school academic characteristics that are associated with such outcomes. The analysis uses nationally representative data from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002).
6/29/2017
NCES 2017087 The Nation’s Report Card: 2016 Arts Assessment at Grade 8

This online report presents the national results of eighth-grade students who participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2016 arts assessment. Results are presented separately for music and visual arts; an overall "arts" scale score is not reported. Although students were evaluated in two arts processes—responding and creating—average scores are presented on a 0–300 scale based on responding questions only. Visual arts results include an average creating task score reported as the average percentage maximum possible score from 0 to 100. Music and visual arts results are also presented as average responding scale scores for students performing at five selected percentiles (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th). Along with overall scores, results are reported by race/ethnicity, gender, type of school, and other demographic groups.

In 2016, average responding scores for eighth-graders in both music and visual arts were not significantly different compared to 2008. In music, the average responding score in 2106 was higher for Hispanic students in comparison to 2008, while the average responding score for male students declined. Results for other reported student demographic groups in 2016 showed that the average responding score in music did not change significantly compared to 2008. In visual arts, the average responding score in 2016 did not change significantly for most reported student demographic groups compared to 2008, but it was higher for students eligible for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP).

In both music and visual arts, score gaps between White and Hispanic students in 2016 narrowed in comparison to 2008, and female students scored higher on average than their male peers in both areas. In visual arts, the score gap between students who were eligible for NSLP and students who were not eligible narrowed compared to 2008. In 2016, students from the Northeast scored higher on average than their peers from the South, Midwest, and West in visual arts, and students from the Northeast scored higher on average than their peers from the West in music.

4/25/2017
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