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Search Results: (31-45 of 86 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC QRMPC1214 WWC Quick Review of the Report "The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program Longitudinal Educational Growth Study Third Year Report"
The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program Longitudinal Educational Growth Study Third Year Report—This study examined whether students in Milwaukee who use a voucher to attend private school have greater mathematics and reading achievement than students who attend public schools. This quick review has been updated with a revised WWC study rating based on information provided by the study authors regarding baseline equivalence of the analysis samples. The WWC study rating was changed to meets WWC Evidence Standards with Reservations. The study authors found no significant differences between math and reading achievement of students who used a voucher to attend private school and comparison students from Milwaukee Public Schools.
12/14/2010
WWC QRDRS1214 WWC Quick Review of the Article "Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning"
Culture and the Interaction of Student Ethnicity with Reward Structure in Group Learning examined the effects of different reward systems used in group learning situations on the math skills of African-American and White students. The study analyzed data on 75 African-American and 57 White fourth- and fifth-grade students from urban schools in the northeastern United States. These students were randomly assigned to three different reward-system groups: reward based on individual performance; reward based on group performance; and, communal learning, no reward. The quick review includes an updated description of the communal learning intervention and its accompanying results, based on additional information provided by the study authors. The study found that African-American students who participated in the communal learning intervention scored statistically significantly higher than those offered a reward based on individual performance. WWC rated the research as meets WWC Evidence Standards.
12/14/2010
WWC QRNYC0929 Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program
The WWC quick review of the report "Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program" reviews a study that examined whether offering low-income families cash rewards for engaging in activities related to children's education, family preventive health care, and parental employment improves family and child outcomes. This quick review focuses specifically on the effects of the Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards program on children's core educational outcomes. The study covered the first two years of this ongoing project and followed more than 9,000 K-12th-graders. The study measured the effect of the Family Rewards program by comparing educational outcomes of students whose families were randomly assigned to participate in the program with students whose families were not given the opportunity to participate. Study authors reported that, of the more than 50 attendance and test-score outcomes examined for elementary and middle school students, the only statistically significant finding was a 2.9 percentage-point difference favoring the Family Rewards group in the percentage of K-5 students who were proficient on the state math test in Year 2 of the study. Of the more than 20 attendance and credit-accumulation outcomes examined for high school students, the study reported statistically significant positive effects of the program on outcomes in two categories: having an attendance rate of 95% or higher and attempting 11 or more credits. However, there were no program effects on the overall attendance rate or total number of credits earned. Of the more than 50 Regents exam outcomes examined, only six were statistically significant and suggest an increase in the number of students attempting and passing Regents exams. There were no significant effects on the four graduation outcomes examined. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards but offers a word of caution to readers that study authors examined a large number of outcomes for a number of age groups and different points in time. Estimating such a large number of effects increases the possibility that some may be found to be statistically significant by chance. The authors did not adjust for this possibility when reporting the statistical significance of individual effects.
9/29/2010
WWC QRSR0929 Study of Summer Reading and Its Effect on Reading Achievement
The WWC quick review of the report "Addressing Summer Reading Setback Among Economically Disadvantaged Elementary Students" reviews a study that examined whether providing summer reading books to economically disadvantaged first- and second-grade students for three consecutive summers improved reading achievement. The study analyzed data on about 1,300 students from 17 high-poverty elementary schools in two large districts in Florida. It compared reading scores of students randomly assigned to receive summer reading books with those of students who did not receive them. Student-level reading achievement was measured by the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test, the state-mandated reading assessment. Study authors found that students who received three consecutive years of free, self-selected summer reading books had statistically significantly higher reading test scores than students who did not receive summer reading books. The reported effect size of 0.14 is interpreted by the WWC as roughly equivalent to moving a student from the 50th percentile to the 56th percentile of reading achievement. In addition, the study found a statistically significant effect of summer reading among students who were the most economically disadvantaged, with an effect size of 0.21. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards and notes that the study was a well-implemented randomized controlled trial.
9/29/2010
WWC QRTAP0929 Evaluation of Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) in Chicago
The WWC quick review of the report "An Evaluation of the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) in Chicago" reviews a study that examined whether the Chicago Teacher Advancement Program, which provides financial incentives for teachers, leads to improved student achievement and teacher retention. The study analyzed data on more than 67,000 students in grades 4 through 8 and on more than 8,000 teachers in about 260 elementary schools in the Chicago Public Schools system. Academic achievement in reading and math was measured using the Illinois Standards Achievement Test, administered in spring of the second study year. Teacher retention was measured as the percentage of teachers who returned to their district and school after the second study year. Study authors found that, compared with a group of matched comparison schools, students at the 16 Teacher Advancement Program schools did not have significantly higher scores on state reading or mathematics tests. The authors reported no significant effect of the Teacher Advancement Program on teacher retention at either the school or district level. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards with reservations but offers a word of caution to readers that the groups of students, teachers, and schools compared in the analysis may have differed from each other in ways not controlled for in the analysis.
9/29/2010
WWC QRCSI0910 The Evaluation of Charter School Impacts: Final Report
The WWC quick review of the report "The Evaluation of Charter School Impacts: Final Report" reviews a study that examined the effect of being offered enrollment at a charter middle school on student achievement and behaviors. The study analyzed data from two cohorts of more than 2,100 students in 29 sites across 15 states between 2005 and 2008. Enrollment offers at each charter school were granted by lottery. Student achievement was measured using state-level reading and math assessments that were standardized to ensure comparability across states. Other outcomes were obtained from school administrative records and from student and parent surveys. Study authors found that, on average, students admitted to charter middle schools through the lottery scored no differently on math and reading assessments than students not offered admission. These program impacts varied widely across study sites; some had positive outcomes and some had negative outcomes. The authors also found no significant overall effects on attendance, grade promotion, or student conduct. When comparing student and parent satisfaction, however, the authors reported consistent statistically significant positive results for students offered a spot in the charter schools. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards, citing that it was a well-implemented randomized controlled trial.
9/21/2010
WWC QRKIPP0910 Student Characteristics and Achievement in 22 KIPP Middle Schools
The WWC quick review of the report "Student Characteristics and Achievement in 22 KIPP Middle Schools" reviews a study that examined the effect of charter schools in the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) network on reading and mathematics achievement in 5th- through 8th-grade students. The study analyzed scores on state assessments for more than 5,600 students who attended 22 KIPP middle schools in nine states and Washington, DC, in the 2000s. Students were followed for one to four years, depending on data availability, and the study standardized all test scores so they could be compared across states. Study authors found that students in the 22 KIPP charter middle schools examined had higher reading and math test scores, on average, than similar students in public middle schools. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards with reservations because, although the study matched KIPP students to comparison students based on test scores and demographic characteristics, it is possible that differences existed between the two groups that were not accounted for in the analysis; these differences could have influenced achievement growth. In addition, the study examined each of the 22 KIPP schools separately, so cross-school conclusions should be interpreted with caution.
9/21/2010
WWC QRMP0808 The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program Longitudinal Educational Growth Study Third Year Report
This study examined whether students who use a voucher to attend private school have greater mathematics and reading achievement than students who attend public schools. The study analyzed data on more than 2,200 elementary and middle school students from public and private schools in Milwaukee. The authors found no significant differences between math and reading achievement of students who used a voucher to attend private school and of comparison students from Milwaukee Public Schools. The WWC does not consider these results to be conclusive because it could not verify from data presented in the study whether the voucher- and comparison-group students were initially equivalent in math and reading achievement. The WWC rated the research described in this report as not consistent with WWC evidence standards and cautioned that, in addition to its concern about pre-study equivalency, some voucher participants had been in private schools for several years before the matching occurred; therefore, differences in test scores do not capture the full impact of the voucher program.
9/8/2010
WWC QRRL0808 Reading and Language Outcomes of a Five-Year Randomized Evaluation of Transitional Bilingual Education
This study examined how the English reading performance of predominantly Spanish-speaking students in transitional bilingual education compared with the performance of predominantly Spanish-speaking students in structured English immersion. Students were randomly assigned to receive either transitional bilingual education or structured English immersion upon entering kindergarten and were followed for three, four, or five years. The study authors found that at the end of kindergarten and first grade, students in structured English immersion had significantly better English-reading skills than students in transitional bilingual education. By the end of second and third grades, when many students in transitional bilingual education had switched to instruction in English, the differences in skills were statistically insignificant for six of the eight outcomes tested. When the students reached fourth grade, they only received English instruction. At this time, differences in English-reading skills between the groups were all statistically insignificant. Two of the four outcomes, though, showed large enough differences favoring structured English immersion that the WWC considered them noteworthy. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meeting WWC evidence standards but offered the following caution: Although all three cohorts of students are included in the analyses of first and second grade outcomes, the analyses of kindergarten and third grade outcomes include two cohorts, and the analysis of fourth grade outcomes includes only one cohort of students.
9/8/2010
REL QRMSM0824 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Middle School Mathematics Professional Development Impact Study: Findings After the First Year of Implementation"
The study examined whether 7th-graders' knowledge of rational numbers improved when the students' math teachers participated in related professional development activities. The study analyzed data on about 4,500 students and 200 teachers from approximately 80 schools in 12 districts during the 2007-08 academic year. The effects of professional development were measured by comparing student outcomes at the end of the academic year in schools that were offered professional development provided by the study with outcomes in schools that did not. The study found that students in schools where teachers were offered extensive professional development performed the same on a test of math achievement in rational numbers as students in comparison schools at the end of the 2007-08 academic year. Further, the study found that the professional development had no impact on teacher knowledge of rational number topics and on how to teach them. However, the study found a significant positive impact of the professional development on one of the three measures of teacher instructional practices examined. Teachers who were offered the study's professional development engaged in 1.03 more activities per hour that elicited student thinking than teachers not offered the study's professional development. The WWC rated the research described in this report as consistent with WWC evidence standards.
8/24/2010
WWC QRFI0824 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Financial Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence From Randomized Trials"
The WWC Quick Review of the report "Financial Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence From Randomized Trials" examines a study on how financial incentives affect student achievement. Researchers measured the incentives' effect by comparing students' achievement levels in schools with and without the program. The study authors found no statistically significant effects on standardized math or reading outcomes in Chicago, New York City, or Washington, DC. Out of six standardized reading achievement outcomes measured in Dallas, the study found two statistically significant effects. Among English speakers, students in the incentive schools scored approximately 0.18 standard deviations higher on English reading comprehension than students who were not eligible for incentives; the WWC interprets this as roughly equivalent to the difference between the 50th and 57th percentile of reading comprehension. Among Spanish speakers, students in the incentive schools scored approximately 0.17 standard deviations lower in English reading vocabulary than students who were not eligible for incentives. The WWC rated the research described in this report as consistent with WWC evidence standards but offers a word of caution to readers that the study does not clarify the level of attrition. Although no schools were dropped from the analysis, it is unclear how many students left the schools over the course of the study.
8/23/2010
WWC QRET0713 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Efficacy of a Theory-Based Abstinence-Only Intervention Over 24 Months"
The "Efficacy of a Theory-Based Abstinence-Only Intervention Over 24 Months" quick review looks at a study that examined whether abstinence-only education program based on behavioral change theory could reduce sexual behavior over a 24-month follow-up period.
7/13/2010
WWC QRHS0713 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report"
The WWC Quick Review on the "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report" examines the effects of offering the federal program Head Start to preschoolers. Head Start aims to improve the school readiness of low-income children by providing preschool education and health and nutrition services.
7/13/2010
WWC QRCS0710 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Charter School Performance in New York City"
"Charter School Performance in New York City" examined the effect of charter school attendance on annual student achievement growth in math and reading. The study analyzed data from a large sample of students in grades three through eight in New York City between 2003 and 2009.
7/7/2010
WWC QREDS0610 WWC Quick Review of the Report "When Schools Close: Effects on Displaced Students in Chicago Public Schools"
The study, "When Schools Close: Effects on Displaced Students in Chicago Public Schools," examined the effect of closing public schools in Chicago on the academic achievement of students who had attended those schools. The study analyzed data on nearly 3,800 students in 18 elementary schools that were closed between 2001 and 2006 and nearly 4,700 students from 18 comparison schools.
7/7/2010
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