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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2018070 Digest of Education Statistics, 2017
The 53rd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
1/30/2019
NCES 2018418 Trends in Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Submissions
These Web Tables combine FAFSA submission data released by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid, starting with the 2006–07 application cycle, with other nationally representative data to show variation in FAFSA submissions by region, state or jurisdiction, selected applicant characteristics, and over time. The publication presents two measures of the number of FAFSA submissions per person. One measure divides the number of FAFSA submissions by the number of individuals who are 18 through 24 years old, which approximates the population of potential traditional-age undergraduates. The other measure divides the number of FAFSA submissions by the enrollment of undergraduate and graduate students.
8/30/2018
NCES 2018038 NAEP Mathematics 2017 State Snapshot Reports
Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the NAEP 2017 mathematics assessment receives a one-page Snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. The reports in this series provide bulleted text describing overall student results, bar charts showing NAEP achievement levels for selected years in which the state participated, and tables displaying results by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. In addition, bulleted text describes the trends in average scale score gaps by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. A map comparing the average score in 2017 to other states/jurisdictions is also displayed.
4/10/2018
NCES 2018039 NAEP Reading 2017 State Snapshot Reports
Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the NAEP 2017 reading assessment receives a one-page Snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. The reports in this series provide bulleted text describing overall student results, bar charts showing NAEP achievement levels for selected years in which the state participated, and tables displaying results by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. In addition, bulleted text describes the trends in average scale score gaps by gender, race/ethnicity, and eligibility for free/reduced-price lunch. A map comparing the average score in 2017 to other states/jurisdictions is also displayed.
4/10/2018
REL 2018290 Impact of providing information to parents in Texas about the role of Algebra II in college admission
This study examines the impact of providing parents with an informational brochure about the role of algebra II in college access on students’ grade 11 algebra II completion rates in Texas. One hundred nine schools, covering all 20 Educational Service Center regions in Texas, participated in the study. Parents in the 54 treatment schools were mailed brochures containing information about the role of algebra II in college access and success, as well as information about the new high school graduation options, while parents in the 55 control schools received brochures only about changes in the high school graduation requirements. The study used data from the Texas Education Agency’s Public Education Information Management System, statewide assessment files, and Texas Academic Performance Report files. A multilevel regression model was used to compare algebra II completion rates during grade 11 for students in participating schools that received information about the role of algebra II in college access and students in participating schools that received the alternate brochure. Interaction terms were included in the model in order to look for differential impacts for high-minority or low-income schools. The study found no statistically significant differences in algebra II completion rates during grade 11 between students in treatment in control schools. However, the study did find a statistically significant interaction between school-level treatment and low-income status. While the estimated impacts of the treatment were not statistically significant for students in low-income schools or for students in non-low-income schools, the interaction suggested a less positive impact in the low-income schools. Additional research could help to parse this out. If parents and guardians of students in schools with and without high percentages of low-income students do respond differently to the two types of brochures, this could help TEA to better design and target informational materials for parents and guardians.
3/1/2018
NCES 2017094 Digest of Education Statistics, 2016
The 52nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/20/2018
REL 2018284 Teacher certification and academic growth among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District
This study assesses whether a teacher’s certification type (that is, being a certified bilingual teacher or a certified English as a second language [ESL] teacher) and route to certification—alternative, postbaccalaureate, traditional, or additional exam—correlate with academic growth and growth in English proficiency among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District (HISD). The student sample consisted of HISD students in grades 4 or 5 during the 2005/06–2014/15 school years who were classified as English learner students, participated in HISD's bilingual or ESL program in grades 4 or 5, and had Spanish as their home language. Data from the four most recent cohorts (2011/12–2014/15) were used for the analyses of mathematics and reading outcomes using the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) assessment program. All cohorts were used for the analyses of the English proficiency outcomes using the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System assessment. The corresponding teacher sample consisted of HISD teachers who taught mathematics or reading to the student sample described. The study used student achievement models, sometimes called value-added specifications, to examine whether specific teacher certification types and routes were associated with larger achievement gains.

For math, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 but lower growth in achievement in grade 5 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 math. For reading, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the traditional route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 reading. For English proficiency, having a teacher with bilingual certification through the postbaccalaureate route was associated with the highest student growth in grade 4. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in English proficiency in grade 5.

Given the inconsistent results, there are no clear implications for practice. Additional research might investigate alternate methods for identifying which teachers are effective.
2/13/2018
REL 2018289 Trends in Algebra II completion and failure rates for students entering Texas public high schools
The purpose of this study was to examine Algebra II completion and failure rates in Texas for high school students in the grade 9 cohorts of 2007/08 through 2014/15. This period spans (1) the point at which Texas began implementing the 4x4 curriculum that required four courses each in English, math (including Algebra II), science, and social studies and (2) when the state moved to the new Foundation High School Program—which eliminates Algebra II as a math requirement—with the 2014/15 cohort. Using longitudinal student- and district-level administrative data from the Texas Education Agency and district-level responses to a statewide online survey administered during spring 2015, the research team examined Algebra II completion and failure rates, and determined how districts were communicating with parents about the new graduation requirements and whether they would be offering the new Algebra II replacement courses during the first year of implementation. Results indicate that approximately 37 percent of districts reported requiring students to complete Algebra II to graduate from high school. Fewer than half of districts reported that they planned to offer the alternative math courses in the first year of implementing the new graduation requirements. Overall, Algebra II completion and failure rates for the 2014/15 cohort followed the same trend as seen for the seven cohorts graduating under the previous graduation requirements. This study suggests that the third high school math course students took was not immediately influenced by the new graduation requirements. Future research could continue to track additional cohorts of students to determine if student change their course-taking in response to additional changes districts may make in implementing the new graduation requirements or if the increased flexibility in course selection is related to other student outcomes such as dropout rates.
2/6/2018
NFES 2017168 Forum Guide to Reporting Civil Rights Data
The Forum Guide to Reporting Civil Rights Data presents a variety of effective methods through which local education agencies (LEAs) report civil rights data to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. In addition, the guide provides examples of how state education agencies can voluntarily help their LEAs with Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) reporting. The guide includes an overview of the CRDC, a discussion of the challenges and opportunities in reporting civil rights data, an explanation of the CRDC reporting process, and case studies that examine how specific education agencies report civil rights data.
2/5/2018
REL 2018288 Special education enrollment and classification in Louisiana charter schools and traditional schools
This study is an exploratory analysis of the enrollment rates of students with individualized education programs (IEPs) in the charter school and traditional school sectors. It also examines factors associated with variation in classification and enrollment rates of students with IEPs across these school sectors in the four educational regions of Louisiana with three or more charter schools. Those areas are Region 1, which includes New Orleans; Region 3, which includes Jefferson and five other parishes near New Orleans; Region 5, which includes Ouachita and five surrounding parishes in the northeast corner of the state; and Region 8, which includes Baton Rouge. In the 2013/14 school year, 77 percent of charter students in Louisiana attended school in one of these four regions.

The study found that the enrollment rate of students with IEPs was lower in public charter schools than traditional public schools in the four Louisiana educational regions in the study from 2010/11 through 2013/14. This gap, however, declined from 2.5 percentage points in 2010/11 to 0.5 percentage points in 2013/14. For three of the four study years the gap was largest in schools serving grades K–5, and for all four study years it was smallest in schools serving grades 9–12. In 2013/14 the special education enrollment rate was higher for charter schools than traditional schools at the high school level (a 2.0 percentage point difference). The gap varied by disability type, as enrollments were higher in charter schools for students with emotional disturbance but higher in traditional schools for students with most other disabilities. Charter school enrollment was not clearly associated with the likelihood of being newly classified as requiring an IEP. However, charter school enrollment was associated with an increased likelihood of being declassified as requiring an IEP, though less than 1 percent of students with an IEP in both charter schools and traditional schools were declassified over the study period. The gap in the declassification rate of 0.04 percentage points favoring charter school declassifications over the four years of the study was too small to explain the 2 percentage point reduction in the charter school special education enrollment gap.

The exploratory results signal that, by the 2013/14 school year, charter schools in Louisiana were serving students with IEPs in the high school grades at rates similar to or higher than traditional schools in the state. The findings suggest that public charter schools are less successful at attracting and enrolling students with IEPs into their schools in the early elementary grades. Finally, these findings confirm those of prior studies that charter schools declassify students as no longer requiring special education services at higher rates than do traditional schools, but those rates of declassification remain less than 1 percent over a four-year period.
1/23/2018
NCES 2018052 Selected Statistics From the Public Elementary and Secondary Education Universe: School Year 2015-16
This First Look report introduces new data concerning public elementary and secondary education in the United States in school year 2015-16.
12/26/2017
NCES 2017116 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 Massachusetts Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for Massachusetts, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017118 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 North Carolina Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for North Carolina, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
NCES 2017119 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2015 Puerto Rico Restricted-use Data Files
This CD-ROM contains PISA 2015 restricted-use data for Puerto Rico, which participated in PISA separately from the nation. The CD-ROM includes all data files connected to data collection in Massachusetts: student, teacher, and principal/school files. These files also include a unique NCES school ID number that can be used to merge the data files with other public NCES datasets, such as the Common Core of Data (CCD) and Private School Survey (PSS). As these data files can be used to identify respondent schools, a restricted-use license must be obtained before access to the data is granted. Click on the restricted-use license link below for more details. Users of these data files are encouraged to refer to the PISA 2015 Technical Report, which provides details on the methods and operations used in collecting the data. The PISA 2015 Technical Report can be found at https://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2017095.
12/19/2017
REL 2018281 Scientific evidence for the validity of the New Mexico Kindergarten Observation Tool
The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was scientific support for using the New Mexico Kindergarten Observation Tool (KOT) to measure distinct domains of children's knowledge and skills at kindergarten entry. The research team conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to identify the latent constructs (or domains) measured in the 2015 KOT field test. In addition, internal consistency analyses were conducted and Rasch modeling was applied to examine item functioning and differential item functioning among student subgroups. Correlational analyses were conducted to examine patterns of associations between validated KOT domains and an independent kindergarten assessment—the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS). Finally, the research team examined the proportion of classroom-level variance in children's KOT scores by calculating the variance partition coefficient after fitting four-level unconditional models. Factor analyses provided support for a two-domain structure measuring children's knowledge and skills in two distinct areas: (1) cognitive school readiness (or academic knowledge and skills) and (2) noncognitive school readiness (or learning and social skills) as well as support for a one-domain structure measuring children's general school readiness. In addition, these KOT domains were moderately correlated with the DIBELS; the KOT cognitive domain was more strongly correlated with DIBELS than the KOT noncognitive domain. For each of the 26 KOT items, rating scale categories functioned appropriately. Three KOT items demonstrated differential item functioning for student subgroups, which signals potential bias for these items. Additional work is required to determine whether those items are truly unfair to certain student subgroups. Finally, classroom-level variation in children's KOT ratings was found. Although there was not scientific support for generating KOT scores based on the state's six intended domains (Physical Development, Health, and Well-Being; Literacy; Numeracy; Scientific Conceptual Understanding; Self, Family, and Community; Approaches to Learning), the 2015 KOT field test produced valid and reliable measures of children's knowledge and skills across two distinct domains and for one overall score that kindergarten teachers can use to better understand and plan for individual children's knowledge and skills at the beginning of kindergarten. Recommended next steps for New Mexico include replication of construct validity analyses with the most recent version of the KOT, consultation with a content expert review panel to investigate further the three items flagged for potential item bias, and further investigation of the sources of classroom-level variance.
12/5/2017
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