Skip Navigation

Publications & Products

Search Results: (1-9 of 9 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2020031 How Legacy High School Students Use Their Flexible Time
Legacy High School in Bismarck Public Schools, North Dakota, personalizes education through flexible time, which allows students to choose how they spend a portion of the school day, outside of their regularly scheduled classes. This report describes how students at Legacy High School used their flexible time and whether their use of flexible time varied by demographic characteristics and academic achievement level. The study used data that Legacy High School collected through a survey tool. Results show that students had approximately 80 minutes of flexible time on average per day and spent 19 percent of this time on academic pursuits. These findings did not vary significantly by academic achievement level or demographic characteristics.
7/21/2020
REL 2014015 The Effects of Increased Learning Time on Student Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: Findings from a Meta-Analytic Review
REL Appalachia conducted a systematic review of the research evidence on the effects of increased learning time. After screening more than 7,000 studies, REL Appalachia identified 30 that met the most rigorous standards for research. A review of those 30 studies found that increased learning time does not always produce positive results. However, some forms of instruction tailored to the needs of specific types of students were found to improve their circumstances. Specific findings include:
  • Increased learning time promoted student achievement in mathematics and literacy when instruction was led by a certified teacher and when teachers used a traditional instructional style (i.e., the teacher is responsible for the progression of activities and students follow directions to complete tasks).
  • Increased learning time improved literacy outcomes for students performing below standards.
  • Increased learning time improved social-emotional skills of students with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
7/9/2014
NCES 2009039 Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2009
This report describes how the education system in the United States compares with education systems in the other G-8 countries--Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom. Twenty-seven indicators are organized in five sections: (1) population and school enrollment; (2) academic performance (including subsections for reading, mathematics, and science); (3) context for learning; (4) expenditure for education; and (5) education returns: educational attainment and income. This report draws on the most current information about education from four primary sources: the Indicators of National Education Systems (INES) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS), the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).
3/25/2009
NCES 2007006 Comparative Indicators of Education in the United States and Other G-8 Countries: 2006
This report describes how the education system in the United States compares with education systems in the other G-8 countries--Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom. Twenty indicators are organized in five sections: (1) population and school enrollment; (2) academic performance; (3) context for learning; (4) expenditure for education; and (5) education returns: educational attainment and income.
8/14/2007
REL 2007006 Supplemental Educational Services and Implementation Challenges in the Northwest Region States
Participation in supplemental educational services in the Northwest Region is about one-third the national rate. Among the challenges to improving services for all eligible children are recruiting, monitoring, and evaluating service providers; communicating effectively at all levels, from parents to the state; and weak data systems, with data both difficult to access and often conflicting.
7/18/2007
NCES 2007305 Changes in Instructional Hours in Four Subjects by Public School Teachers of Grades 1 Through 4 (Issue Brief)
This Statistics in Brief uses data from five administrations of the Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) to examine the distribution of weekly instructional hours by regular, full-time first- through fourth-grade teachers of self-contained classrooms in four subjects: English/reading/language arts; arithmetic/mathematics; social studies/history; and, science. Results show that combined teacher instructional time in the four subjects has increased between 1987-88 and 2003-04. However, examining each subject shows that this increase is largely due to an overall increase in the amount of instruction in English and mathematics. In the two most recent administrations, 1999-2000 and 2003-04, weekly teacher instructional hours in English increased while instructional time in mathematics, social studies, and science decreased. Despite the fluctuations in hours of instruction, total instructional time in the four subjects as a percentage of the student school week did not change significantly between 1987-88 and 2003-04; it was about 67 percent of the school week in each year.
6/4/2007
NCES 2002131 Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000
This report provides national data on arts education in public elementary and secondary schools during 1999–2000. Five surveys were employed in order to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the state of arts education. The first two surveys captured information from elementary and secondary school principals on a wide variety of topics related to how the arts were delivered in the nation’s regular public schools, such as: the availability and characteristics of instructional programs in music, visual arts, dance, and drama/theatre; staffing; space for arts instruction; and funding sources. Other topics included supplemental programs and activities in the arts, administrative support, and the perceived status of the arts among school staff and parents. As a complement to the elementary school survey, the elementary school music specialist, visual arts specialist, and self-contained classroom teacher surveys provided data on a broad range of topics regarding how the arts were taught in the nation’s public elementary schools in 1999–2000. Topics included: the educational backgrounds (e.g., degrees, certification, years of experience) of music specialists, visual arts specialists, and classroom teachers; participation in professional development activities; teaching load; teaching practices; collaboration and integration of the arts into other areas of the curriculum; and teacher involvement in arts-related activities outside of school.
5/15/2002
NCES 1999019 America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999
This annual monitoring report to the Nation on child well-being produced by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. It covers key indicators of child population and family characteristics, economic security, child health, behavior and social environment, and education. It also includes a special feature on children with disabilities.
7/8/1999
NCES 97293 Time Spent Teaching Core Academic Subjects in Elementary Schools: Comparisons Across Community, School, Teacher, and Student Characteristics
This report describes the number of hours and the percentage of school time spent on core academic subjects during the elementary school week around the country. It addresses three central issues about using class time to teach core academic subjects. The first issue is the actual number of hours and the percentage of school time the nation's elementary school teachers spend on instruction in the core subject areas of English/reading/language arts, mathematics, social studies, and science. The second issue involves an analysis of how this time varies by characteristics of the local community, school, teacher, classroom, and students. Finally, trends over time are examined to see how the amount and percentage of time spent on the four core subjects has changed from 1987-88 to 1993-94.
2/11/1997
   1 - 9