Skip Navigation

Publications & Products

Search Results: (1-15 of 17 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2012046 Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study
The Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study is a congressionally-mandated statistical report that documents the scope and nature of gaps in access and persistence in higher education by sex and race/ethnicity. The report presents 46 indicators grouped under seven main topic areas: (1) demographic context; (2) characteristics of schools; (3) student behaviors and afterschool activities; (4) academic preparation and achievement; (5) college knowledge; (6) postsecondary education; and (7) postsecondary outcomes and employment. In addition, the report contains descriptive multivariate analyses of variables that are associated with male and female postsecondary attendance and attainment.
8/28/2012
NCES 2012026 America's Youth: Transitions to Adulthood
America's Youth contains statistics that address important aspects of the lives of youth, including family, schooling, work, community, and health. The report focuses on American youth and young adults 14 to 24 years old, and presents trends in various social contexts that may relate to youth education and learning.
12/20/2011
WWC QRNYC0929 Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program
The WWC quick review of the report "Toward Reduced Poverty Across Generations: Early Findings From New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program" reviews a study that examined whether offering low-income families cash rewards for engaging in activities related to children's education, family preventive health care, and parental employment improves family and child outcomes. This quick review focuses specifically on the effects of the Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards program on children's core educational outcomes. The study covered the first two years of this ongoing project and followed more than 9,000 K-12th-graders. The study measured the effect of the Family Rewards program by comparing educational outcomes of students whose families were randomly assigned to participate in the program with students whose families were not given the opportunity to participate. Study authors reported that, of the more than 50 attendance and test-score outcomes examined for elementary and middle school students, the only statistically significant finding was a 2.9 percentage-point difference favoring the Family Rewards group in the percentage of K-5 students who were proficient on the state math test in Year 2 of the study. Of the more than 20 attendance and credit-accumulation outcomes examined for high school students, the study reported statistically significant positive effects of the program on outcomes in two categories: having an attendance rate of 95% or higher and attempting 11 or more credits. However, there were no program effects on the overall attendance rate or total number of credits earned. Of the more than 50 Regents exam outcomes examined, only six were statistically significant and suggest an increase in the number of students attempting and passing Regents exams. There were no significant effects on the four graduation outcomes examined. The WWC rated the research described in this report as meets WWC evidence standards but offers a word of caution to readers that study authors examined a large number of outcomes for a number of age groups and different points in time. Estimating such a large number of effects increases the possibility that some may be found to be statistically significant by chance. The authors did not adjust for this possibility when reporting the statistical significance of individual effects.
9/29/2010
REL 2007006 Supplemental Educational Services and Implementation Challenges in the Northwest Region States
Participation in supplemental educational services in the Northwest Region is about one-third the national rate. Among the challenges to improving services for all eligible children are recruiting, monitoring, and evaluating service providers; communicating effectively at all levels, from parents to the state; and weak data systems, with data both difficult to access and often conflicting.
7/18/2007
WWC IRDPHSR07 High School Redirection
High School Redirection is an alternative high school program for youth considered at risk of dropping out. The program emphasizes basic skills development (with a particular focus on reading skills) and offers limited extra-curricular activities. The schools operate in economically disadvantaged areas and serve students who have dropped out in the past, who are teen parents, who have poor test scores, or who are over-age for their grade. To foster a sense of community, the schools are small and teachers are encouraged to act as mentors as well as instructors.
4/16/2007
NCES 2006076 After-School Programs and Activities: 2005
This report presents data on participation in after-school activities and programs in the United States. The data are from the After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA) of the 2005 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2005). The data presented in the report are based on a nationally representative sample of students in kindergarten through grade 8. In 2005, 40 percent of students in kindergarten through eighth grade participated in after-school care arrangements that occurred at least once each week.
5/31/2006
NCES 2005303 What is the Status of High School Athletes 8 Years after Their Senior Year?
This report examines the status of high school athletes 8 years after their senior year in high school. Using a representative sample of sophomores in 1990, who were seniors in 1992, from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), this report provides information on 1990–1992 high school athletes’ educational, labor market, and health status in the year 2000, eight years after their scheduled high school graduation. Outcomes for persons who reported participating in high school athletics are compared to outcomes for persons who reported not participating in high school athletics. In addition, outcomes among persons who participated in high school athletics at different levels of participation—as elite athletes (team captains or most valuable players [MVPs] in 1990 or 1992), varsity athletes, and junior varsity (JV)/intramural athletes—are compared. The results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis, to investigate the independent association between high school athletic participation and outcomes later in life—are also reported.
9/8/2005
NCES 2005050 Youth Indicators, 2005: Trends in the Well-Being of American Youth
Youth Indicators contains statistics that address important aspects of the lives of youth, including family, schooling, work, community, and health. The report focuses on American youth and young adults 14 to 24 years old, and presents trends in various social contexts that may relate to youth education and learning.
7/29/2005
NCES 2005094 The Condition of Education 2005
The Condition of Education 2005 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 40 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of the mobility of elementary and secondary school teachers. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2005 print edition includes 40 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2005
NCES 2005173 User's Guide to Developing Student Interest Surveys Under Title IX
This User's Guide, prepared for the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education, provides a guide for conducting a survey of student interest in order to satisfy Part 3 of the Three-Part Test established in the 1979 Policy Interpretation of the intercollegiate athletic provisions of Title IX of the Higher Education Act of 1972.
4/1/2005
NCES 2005016 Trends in Educational Equity of Girls & Women: 2004
This statistical report assembles a series of indicators that examine the extent to which males and females have access to the same educational opportunities, avail themselves equally of these opportunities, perform at similar levels throughout schooling, succeed at similar rates, and reap the same benefits from their educational experiences. This report serves as an update of an earlier publication, Trends in Educational Equity of Girls & Women (NCES 2000-030), which was prepared for Congress in 2000.
11/19/2004
NCES 2004077 The Condition of Education 2004
The Condition of Education 2004 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 38 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of changes in student financial aid between 1989-90 and 1999-2000. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2004 print edition includes 38 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2004
NCES 2004008 Before- and After-School Care, Programs, and Activities of Children in Kindergarten Through Eighth Grade: 2001
This report provides insight into the complex and varied ways kindergarten through eighth graders in the nation spend their time out of school. Some spend time in with relative or a nonrelative in a home setting. Others spend time in center- or school-based programs or organized activities that are aimed toward their enrichment or enjoyment. Still others are responsible for themselves during out-of-school time. Children also experience patchworks of arrangements in order to meet the contingencies of availability, cost, etc. Data used for this report come from the Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey of the 2001 National Household Education Surveys Program.
4/13/2004
NCES 2003078 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2001: Data Files and Electronic Codebook
The National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES) was comprised of three surveys in 2001: the Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Survey (AELL-NHES: 2001), the Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA-NHES: 2001) and the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey (ECPP-NHES: 2001). The data, data documentation, and software to help search through and convert the data into SPSS, SAS, or STATA files are available on CD, and the data files and documentation can also be downloaded directly from this website.
10/31/2003
NCES 2003081 National Household Education Surveys of 2001: Data File User’s Manual, Volume III, Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey
This manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the public-use data file for the NHES:2001 Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA-NHES:2001). This volume contains a description of the content and organization of the data file, including useful information regarding questionnaire items and the various derived variables found on the file. The reader should especially note the discussion of data considerations and anomalies in chapter 7. Included as appendixes are the public-use data file layout, SAS code for creating derived variables, the codebook for the ASPA-NHES:2001 public-use data file, and directions and sample code for linking the NHES:2001 data files. Volume III is meant to be read in conjunction with Volume I of the NHES:2001 Data File User’s Manual. More information about the purpose of the study, the sample design, the ECPP and AELL surveys, the data collection instruments, and data collection and data processing procedures is contained in Volume I. Detailed information about the ECPP-NHES:2001 and the AELL-NHES:2001 can be found in Volumes II and IV, respectively.
9/29/2003
   1 - 15     Next >>
Page 1  of  2