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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2016149 Using computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to monitor the progress of English learner students
The purpose of this study was to examine (a) how teachers and school staff individually administer computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to English learner students in grades 3–5, and (b) how they use the assessments to monitor students' growth. Because adaptive assessments maximize precision of information while minimizing time spent gaining it, they are particularly valuable for students whose performance is outside typical grade-level norms such as English learner students. Three elementary schools with high proportions of English learner students participated in the study. Participating students were at the two lowest levels on the state oral language proficiency measure. At the beginning of the year there were 117 participating students and by the end of the year 102 remained at the same school. To address the first question, Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southeast staff observed the September training and the fall, winter, and spring administration of the Florida Center for Reading Research Reading Assessment (FRA). To address the second question, teachers and school staff individually administered the FRA to participating students in the fall, winter, and spring. They discussed their observations of students' performance during test administration and students' score reports with REL staff after each assessment period. Findings indicated that teachers in grades 3–5 can be trained to individually administer computer-adaptive assessments of literacy to their English learner students three times a year and to participate in data chats after each assessment period to discuss translation of scores to instruction. The report provides recommendations that may aid districts in implementing such adaptive assessments of literacy to monitor the progress of English learner students.
6/28/2016
NCEE 20134000 The Impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Program on Student Reading Achievement
This study examined the impact of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) program on student reading achievement and teachers' use of differentiated instructional practices. The MAP program is one of the most widely used commercially available systems incorporating benchmark assessment and training in differentiated instruction. MAP includes computer-adaptive assessments administered to students three or four times a year and teacher training and access to MAP resources on how to use data from these assessments to differentiate instruction. The study used a randomized design and involved 32 elementary schools in five districts in Illinois. The study found no impacts of MAP on student reading achievement or on teachers' use of differentiated instructional practices.
12/18/2012
NCEE 20124036 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation
For report NCEE 2010-4035 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=REL20104035

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized trial examined the impact of the Thinking Reader program on student vocabulary and reading comprehension. The study found no direct causal evidence supporting Thinking Reader’s effectiveness. The final analysis included 90 teachers and a minimum of 2,140 students (89% of the overall baseline sample, 90% of the intervention group, and 88% of the control group).
11/26/2012
WWC SSRL12 WWC Review of the Report "Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation"
Thinking Reader is a software program that aims to motivate middle school students to read and to make self-directed use of seven target comprehension strategies: a) summarizing, b) clarifying, c) visualizing, d) reflecting, e) questioning, f) predicting, and g) feeling. Students listen to a novel while following highlighted text on a computer screen and then respond to questions about the story. The program applies reciprocal teaching methods through the use of animated coaches and peers to enhance comprehension strategies.
8/7/2012
WWC IRHSM12 I CAN Learn
I CAN Learn® is a computer software system that provides math instruction through a series of interactive lessons. These lessons are delivered with a one-to-one student-to-computer ratio. Students determine the pace of each lesson and must demonstrate mastery of the lesson before progressing to the next one. Teachers provide individualized instruction to students on the basis of their performance on the lessons.
2/28/2012
REL 20104035 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation: Final Report
Improving adolescent literacy is a critical step toward improving adolescent academic achievement (Kamil , Borman, Dole, Kral, Salinger, & Torgesen, 2008). "Adolescent literacy" commonly refers to the skills that students in Grades 4–12 need in order to successfully learn by reading, as opposed to learning how to read, which is emphasized in earlier grades (Kamil, 2003; Kamil et al., 2008; National Governors Association, 2005). Recent policy reports emphasize the need to build students' reading vocabulary and comprehension skills to meet the increased literacy demands that begin in Grade 4 (Carnegie Council on Advancing Adolescent Literacy, 2010; Meltzer, Smith, & Clark, 2001). Experts who drafted the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts have emphasized that students must show a steadily increasing ability to discern more from text to become successful readers (National Governors Association & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010). The current study evaluates an intervention (Thinking Reader®) designed to improve middle school students’ reading vocabulary and comprehension (Tom Snyder Productions, 2006a). It responds to an interest expressed by stakeholders to the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands in improving literacy outcomes for students beyond elementary school.
4/4/2011
NCEE 20094042 Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from Two Student Cohorts
The restricted-use data file for this report contains data for the 2004-05 and 2005-06 school year for 14 software products (1st-grade reading, 4th-grade reading, 6th grade math, and high school algebra) and student achievement.
2/4/2011
NCEE 20074006 Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings from the First Student Cohort
The restricted-use data data file for this report contains data for the 2004-05 school year including implementation of 16 software products (1st-grade reading, 4th-grade reading, 6th grade math, and high school algebra) and student achievement.
2/4/2011
WWC IRESMAM10 Accelerated Math
Accelerated Math is a software tool used to customize assignments and monitor progress in mathematics for students in grades 1112. Based on its review of the research, the WWC found Accelerated Math to have mixed effects for math achievement for elementary school students.
9/14/2010
WWC IRHMCL10 Carnegie Learning Curricula and Cognitive Tutor Software
Carnegie Learning Curricula and Cognitive Tutor Software merges algebra textbooks with interactive software developed around an artificial intelligence model that identifies strengths and weaknesses in an individual student's mastery of mathematical concepts. The software customizes prompts to focus on areas in which the student is struggling and routes the student to problems that address those specific concepts. Based on its review of the research, the WWC found the intervention to have no discernible effects on math achievement for high school students.
8/31/2010
WWC IRALFF10 Fast ForWord
Fast ForWord is a computer-based reading program intended to help students develop and strengthen the cognitive skills necessary for successful reading and learning. The program includes two components, Fast ForWord Language and Literacy and Fast ForWord to Reading. Based on its review of the research, the WWC found the program to have no discernible effects on alphabetics and general literacy achievement and potentially positive effects on reading fluency and comprehension for adolescent learners.
8/31/2010
WWC IRSLDRN10 Read Naturally
In the topic area of Students with Learning Disabilities, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has released an Intervention Report on Read Naturally, a program designed to improve reading fluency using a combination of books, audiotapes, and computer software. The study that meets WWC evidence standards includes 20 students with learning disabilities in grades 4 through 6 in one elementary school in Washington State. Based on the review of the research, the WWC found Read Naturally to have a small extent of evidence, potentially positive effects on writing, and no discernible effects on reading fluency for students with learning disabilities.
7/27/2010
WWC IRSLDR110 READ 180
The second intervention report from the WWC reviews the research on READ 180, a reading program designed for students in grades 3-12 whose reading achievement is below the proficient level. READ 180 aims to address gaps in students' skills through the use of computer software, literature, and direct instruction in reading skills. The WWC identified 56 studies investigating the effects of READ 180 on students with learning disabilities.
7/13/2010
WWC IRELLRN10 Read Naturally
The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) examined the research on Read Naturally, a supplemental reading program designed to improve reading fluency. This review focuses on Read Naturally for English language learners. Using a combination of books, audiotapes, and computer software, Read Naturally, has three main strategies. The first involves repeated reading of text for developing oral reading fluency. The second uses teacher modeling, a process where students read along while listening to a recording of a fluent reader. The third strategy incorporates monitoring of student progress by teachers and the students themselves. Based on its review of the research, the WWC found no discernible effects in reading achievement and English language development for elementary school English language learners.
7/7/2010
WWC QRER0323 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software products: Findings for Two Student Cohorts"
See the one-page WWC Quick Review of a study that looked at the effects of ten reading and mathematics software products on student achievement. "Effectiveness of Reading and Mathematics Software Products: Findings for Two Student Cohorts" randomly assigned teachers to either receive training and materials to incorporate commercial computer software into their curriculum or to continue using their regular curriculum. Analyzing data on more than 11,000 students in 23 primarily urban, low-income school districts, the study found that one of six products reading products had positive effects on test scores; none of the four math products did.
3/23/2010
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