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Search Results: (46-60 of 120 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
WWC IRDIS576 Repeated Reading
Repeated reading is an academic practice that aims to increase oral reading fluency. Repeated reading can be used with students who have developed initial word reading skills but demonstrate inadequate reading fluency for their grade level. During repeated reading, a student sits in a quiet location with a teacher and reads a passage aloud at least three times. Typically, the teacher selects a passage of about 50 to 200 words in length. If the student misreads a word or hesitates for longer than 5 seconds, the teacher reads the word aloud, and the student repeats the word correctly. If the student requests help with a word, the teacher reads the word aloud or provides the definition. The student rereads the passage until he or she achieves a satisfactory fluency level.
5/10/2014
NCSER 20143000 Improving Reading Outcomes for Students with or at Risk for Reading Disabilities: A Synthesis of the Contributions from the Institute of Education Sciences Research Centers
The report describes what has been learned regarding the improvement of reading outcomes for children with or at risk for reading disabilities through research funded by the Institute's National Center for Education Research and National Center for Special Education Research and published in peer-reviewed outlets through December 2011. The synthesis describes contributions to the knowledge base produced by IES-funded research across four focal areas:
  • Assessment: What have we learned about effective identification and assessment of students who have or are at risk for reading difficulties or disabilities?
  • Basic Cognitive and Linguistic Processes: What are the basic cognitive and linguistic processes that support successful reading and how can these skills be improved for students who have or who are at risk for reading disabilities?
  • Intervention: How do we make reading instruction more effective for students who have or are at risk for developing reading disabilities? How do we teach reading to students with low incidence disabilities?
  • Professional Development: How do we bring research-based instructional practices to the classroom?
2/27/2014
NCEE 20144007 Evaluation of the Personnel Development Program to Improve Services and Results for Children with Disabilities
This report describes activities of national technical assistance centers and special education personnel training programs supported through the Personnel Development Program (PDP) authorized by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The evaluation assessed the quality and relevance of products of PDP grantees funded between FY 2001 and FY 2007.
1/7/2014
NCES 2014015 Digest of Education Statistics, 2012
The 48th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
12/31/2013
WWC IRD626 Reciprocal Teaching
Although reciprocal teaching has been used for years as a method for teaching reading comprehension skills, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) has found no rigorous research that shows it works or does not work for students with learning disabilities. Using the reciprocal teaching method, teachers model four comprehension strategies for their students: summarizing, questioning, clarifying, and predicting. The students then practice these strategies and take turns leading small group discussions about what has been read. The WWC identified 54 studies of reciprocal teaching for students with learning disabilities that were published or released between 1989 and 2013. None of these studies meet WWC evidence standards. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of this method for students with learning disabilities.
11/26/2013
NCEE 20134017 The Inclusion of Students With Disabilities in School Accountability Systems: An Update
This report presents updated descriptive information on school-level accountability, adequate yearly progress (AYP), and school improvement status of schools accountable and schools not accountable for the performance of the students with disabilities (SWD) subgroup under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Findings are based on U.S. Department of Education EDFacts data from the 2006–07 to 2009–10 school years for up to 44 states and the District of Columbia.
10/21/2013
NCEE 20134011 Improving Post-High School Outcomes for Transition-Age Students with Disabilities: An Evidence Review
A new report reviews the research literature on strategies designed to help students with disabilities transition from high school to employment, postsecondary education and training, or independent living. The review deviates from previous evidence reviews on this topic by using the What Works Clearinghouse (WWW) systematic review procedures, focusing on direct measures of students' post-high school outcomes, and including more recent studies released between April 2008 and June 2011.

A total of 43 eligible studies were reviewed and assigned a WWC standards rating, of which 16 met the WWC standards. Community-based work programs were found to have mixed effects on students’ employment outcomes and potentially positive effects on postsecondary education outcomes. Functional life skills development programs were found to have potentially positive effects on independent living outcomes although the extent of evidence was small.

Taking this evidence as a whole, the review highlights the limited support currently available from high quality intervention research to identify a wide range of programs and strategies that help students with disabilities transition to employment, postsecondary education and training, or independent living. The report offers hypotheses about program characteristics, program development, and research design considerations gleaned from studies that met WWC standards as well as those considered as "exploratory."
8/19/2013
NCES 2013060 ECLS-K:2011 Restricted-Use Kindergarten Data File and Electronic Codebook
This CD contains an electronic codebook (ECB), a restricted-use data file, and survey and ECB documentation for the fall and spring kindergarten rounds of data collection for the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011). The CD includes the User’s Manual for the ECLS-K:2011 Kindergarten Data File and Electronic Codebook (NCES 2013-061)
7/17/2013
WWC IRCYD623 Second Step
Second Step is a classroom-based social skills program for students in preschool through junior high (ages 4-14 years). Second Step is designed to reduce impulsive, high-risk, and aggressive behaviors and increase children's social competence and other protective factors. No studies of Second Step meet WWC evidence standards. Therefore, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the impacts of Second Step on these children. More high-quality research is needed to determine if the program works for children classified with an emotional disturbance (or children at risk for classification).
3/5/2013
WWC SSR0108 WWC Review of the Report "Same-Language-Subtitling (SLS): Using Subtitled Music Video for Reading Growth"
The 2009 study, Same-Language-Subtitling (SLS): Using Subtitled Music Video for Reading Growth, examined the impacts of SLS, a karaoke-style subtitling intervention, on the reading comprehension skills of secondary school students in Kaneohe, Hawaii. SLS uses videos with captioned text that changes color in synchronization with the audio. This practice aims to encourage reading and increase reading proficiency. Researchers randomly assigned 198 secondary school students with learning disabilities (ages 14 to 19) to either special education classrooms using the SLS intervention or comparison classrooms (special or general education). The final study sample consisted of 51 students in the intervention condition, who were exposed to SLS for 12 weeks, and 98 students in the comparison condition, who received the school’s regular curriculum. To assess the effects of the program, researchers compared the reading comprehension scores on the achievement tests of students in both groups at the end of the 12-week intervention in June, and again after the summer break in September. Intervention students scored significantly higher on the reading comprehension achievement posttests at both points in time than students in the comparison condition. This study is a well-implemented randomized controlled trial, and the research described meets WWC evidence standards without reservations.
1/8/2013
WWC IRDIS573 Reading Mastery
When compared to another Direct Instruction intervention, Horizons, Reading Mastery was found to have no discernible effects on alphabetics and reading comprehension for students with learning disabilities.
7/10/2012
NCES 2012001 Digest of Education Statistics, 2011
The 47th in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
6/13/2012
NCEE 20124056 The Inclusion of Students With Disabilities in School Accountability Systems
This interim report presents descriptive information on school-level accountability, adequate yearly progress (AYP), and school improvement status of schools accountable and schools not accountable for the performance of the students with disabilities (SWD) subgroup under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Based on U. S. Department of Education EDFacts data from the 2005-06 to 2008-09 school years for up to 40 states, key findings from the study include:
  • Across the 40 states with relevant data, 35 percent of public schools were accountable for the performance of the SWD subgroup in the 2008-09 school year, representing 58 percent of tested SWDs in those states. In those same 40 states, 62 percent of middle schools were accountable for SWD performance, while 31 percent of elementary schools and 23 percent of high schools were accountable.
  • In 20 states that had relevant data for all fours years, there was a steady increase in the percentage of SWD-accountable schools, from 25 percent in the 2005-06 school year to 34 percent in the 2008-09 school year.
  • In 32 states with relevant data, 55 percent of public schools were not accountable for the SWD subgroup in any of the 4 years examined, while 18 percent of schools that were consistently accountable in each of the 4 years.
  • In 37 states with relevant data, nine percent of all public schools missed AYP in the 2008-09 school year because of SWD subgroup performance and other reason(s), and 5 percent missed it solely because of SWD subgroup performance. Together these schools served 28 percent of tested SWDs in all public schools in these states.
  • Among schools that were consistently accountable for the performance of the SWD subgroup during the 4 years across 27 states, 56 percent were never identified for school improvement over this time period. By comparison, among schools that were not accountable for SWD subgroup performance in any of the 4 years, 76 percent were never identified for improvement.
5/29/2012
WWC IRSNPB12 Play-Based Interventions
Play-based interventions are practices designed to help young children with disabilities to better explore, experiment, interact, and express themselves. During play sessions, an interventionist uses strategies including modeling, verbal redirection, reinforcement, and indirect instruction to sustain and encourage child play activities. The WWC identified 62 studies of play-based interventions for preschool children with disabilities in early education settings that were published or released between 1989 and 2011. None of these studies meet WWC evidence standards. The WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of play-based interventions on preschool children with disabilities. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of this intervention.
4/24/2012
WWC IRSNIY12 The Incredible Years
No studies of The Incredible Years that fall within the scope of the Early Childhood Education for Children with Disabilities review protocol meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) evidence standards. The lack of studies meeting WWC evidence standards means that, at this time, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of The Incredible Years on preschool children with disabilities in early education settings. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of this intervention.
2/7/2012
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