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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2019059 Data File User's Manual for the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016: Supplementary Geocode Files for the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey, Early Childhood Program Participation Survey, and Adult Training and Education Survey
This Data File User's Manual contains documentation about the purpose and contents of restricted-use data files that include additional geographic information for the three 2016 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2016) surveys: the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) Survey, the Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) Survey, and the Adult Training and Education Survey (ATES). Variables are drawn from administrative and survey data from NCES and other federal agencies (primarily data from the Census Bureau) to expand the analytic utility of NHES:2016 data. The supplementary data include geographic identifiers down to the census block group and identifiers for a child’s assigned public school district. The files also include measures based on radii around a respondent’s home for access to different education programs and schools. While additional geographic characteristic information is provided, the data support estimates of national-level characteristics and not subnational geographies like states or specific localities. The additional geocode data can be used to produce nationally representative estimates or national-level subgroup analyses such as schooling experiences of students living in low-population density areas with high employment rates across the U.S. but not schooling experiences of students in a specific rural area.
11/4/2019
REL 2020012 Children's knowledge and skills at kindergarten entry in Illinois: Results from the first statewide administration of the Kindergarten Individual Development Survey
Starting in fall 2017, the Illinois State Board of Education required kindergarten teachers to use an observational kindergarten entry assessment called the Kindergarten Individual Development Survey. This study examined whether the measures formed using the assessment data were valid and reliable and described the means and variation in children's knowledge and skills at school entry. To inform future professional development on data collection and use, the study team also interviewed teachers and administrators about their experience with the assessment.
10/28/2019
REL 2016184 Stated Briefly: Ramping up to college readiness in Minnesota high schools: Implementation of a schoolwide program
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. This study examined whether the Ramp-Up to Readiness program (Ramp-Up) differs from college readiness supports that are typically offered by high schools, whether high schools were able to implement Ramp-Up to Readiness to the developer's satisfaction, and how staff in schools implementing Ramp-Up to Readiness perceive the program. The researchers conducted interviews and focus groups with staff in two groups of schools: (1) a group of 10 schools that were in the first year of implementation of Ramp-Up to Readiness, and (2) a group of 10 other schools that were not implementing the program. The researchers also administered surveys to staff employed by these 20 schools as well as to students in grades 10-12 in these schools. Through these data collection efforts, the researchers obtained information on the types of college readiness programming and supports in the two types of schools, students' perceptions of college-focused staff-student interactions, schools' success at implementing Ramp-Up to Readiness’ core components and sub-components, and the opinions of staff in implementing schools about the program. Compared with non-Ramp-Up schools, those implementing Ramp-Up offered more college-oriented structural supports, professional development, and student-staff interactions. Ramp-Up schools also made greater use of postsecondary planning tools. Students in Ramp-Up schools perceived more emphasis on four of five dimensions of college readiness than students in comparison schools. Ramp-Up schools met the program developer’s threshold for adequate implementation on four of five program components (structural supports, professional development, curriculum delivery, and curriculum content). However only 2 of the 10 schools met the developer’s adequacy threshold for the other component (use of postsecondary planning tools). Staff at Ramp-Up schools generally had favorable perceptions of the program. Schools that implement Ramp-Up were able to offer deeper college readiness support to more students than comparison schools. Schools that adopt Ramp-Up can implement the program as intended by the program developer, but some program components are more challenging to implement than others. Additional studies should be performed to examine whether implementation improves after a second year of implementation and whether Ramp-Up improves the likelihood that students will enroll and succeed in college.
9/6/2016
REL 2016123 Developmental education and college readiness at the University of Alaska
This study examines the postsecondary readiness of first-time students who enrolled in the University of Alaska system over a four-year period. The study calculates the proportion of students considered academically underprepared for college and how placement rates for developmental education (that is, non–credit-bearing courses) vary for different groups of students. The study also determines the proportion of students placed in developmental education who eventually enrolled in and passed college English and math. Finally, the analysis looks at whether high school grades, rather than exam performance, are a better predictor of success in college-level courses.

Results show that developmental education rates were higher in math than English for students pursuing any degree type and increased as the gap between high school exit and college entry grew. Among students pursuing a bachelor's degree, developmental placement rates were highest for Black students from urban areas of the state (in math) and Alaska Native students from rural areas (in English) compared to all other student groups. Almost half (47 percent) of students placed in developmental courses eventually passed college English and almost a quarter (23 percent) passed college math. For students who enrolled directly in college, high school grade point average was a stronger predictor of college-level English and math performance than were SAT, ACT, and ACCUPLACER scores. Secondary and postsecondary stakeholders can use the findings to help identify students in need of support to be college-ready and to consider further conversation and additional research regarding whether and how to use high school grade point average as part of the placement process.
5/17/2016
REL 2016134 Stated Briefly: Can scores on an interim high school reading assessment accurately predict low performance on college readiness exams?
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the results of another report of the same name. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which performance on Florida's interim reading assessment could be used to identify students who may not perform well on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) and ACT Plan. Data included the 2013/14 PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Plan results for students in grade 10 from two districts, as well as their grade 9 results on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading—Florida Standards (FAIR-FS). PSAT/NMSQT Critical Reading performance is best predicted in the study sample by a student's reading comprehension skills, while PSAT/NMSQT Mathematics and Writing performance is best predicted by a student's syntactic knowledge. Syntactic knowledge is the most important predictor of ACT Plan English, Reading, and Science in the study sample, whereas reading comprehension skills were found to best predict ACT Plan Mathematics results. Sensitivity rates ranged from 81 percent to 89 percent correct across all of the models. These results provide preliminary evidence that FAIR-FS scores could be used to create an early warning system for performance on both the PSAT/NMSQT and ACT Plan.
5/3/2016
REL 2016124 Can scores on an interim high school reading assessment accurately predict low performance on college readiness exams?
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of reading comprehension, decoding, and language with college-ready performance. This research was motivated by leaders in two Florida school districts interested in the extent to which performance on Florida’s interim reading assessment could be used to identify students who may not perform well on the Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT) and ACT Plan. One of the districts primarily administers the PSAT/NMSQT and the other primarily administers the ACT Plan. Data included the 2013/14 PSAT/NMSQT or ACT Plan results for students in grade 10 from these districts, as well as their grade 9 results on the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading – Florida Standards (FAIR-FS). Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses formed the framework for an early warning system of risk for each PSAT/NMSQT and ACT Plan subject-area assessment. PSAT/NMSQT Critical Reading performance is best predicted in the study sample by a student’s reading comprehension skills, while PSAT/NMSQT Mathematics and Writing performance is best predicted by a student’s syntactic knowledge. Syntactic knowledge is the most important predictor of ACT Plan English, Reading, and Science in the study sample, whereas reading comprehension skills were found to best predict ACT Plan Mathematics results. Sensitivity rates (the percentage of students correctly identified as at risk) ranged from 81 percent to 89 percent correct across all of the CART models. These results provide preliminary evidence that FAIR-FS scores could be used to create an early warning system for performance on both the PSAT/NMSQT and ACT Plan. The potential success of using FAIR-FS scores as an early warning system could enable districts to identify at-risk students without adding additional testing burden, time away from instruction, or additional cost. The analyses should be replicated statewide to verify the stability of the models and the generalizability of the results to the larger Florida student population.
4/20/2016
REL 2011107 Participation During the First Four Years of Tennessee's Voluntary Prekindergarten Program
This study examines the first four years of Tennessee's Voluntary Prekindergarten program, directed to four-year-olds eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. It reviews participation levels and trends for the program as a whole, for collaborative partner classrooms, and for student and district subgroups and discusses the geographic distribution of program sites.
9/26/2011
WWC QRHS1214 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report"
Head Start Impact Study: Final Report— examined the effects of offering Head Start to 3- and 4-year-olds. The study analyzed data on about 4,700 preschool-aged children who applied for enrollment for the 2002–03 program- year, at one of about 380 Head Start centers randomly selected for the study, and followed the students through first grade. The study compared the outcomes of children who were offered enrollment in Head Start to the outcomes of children who were not offered enrollment. School-readiness outcomes, which are the focus of this quick review, were measured using standardized cognitive assessments of language and literacy, pre-writing, and math skills administered at the end of each year through first grade. This quick review has been updated with a revised WWC study rating based on additional attrition and baseline equivalence information provided by the authors. With regard to effectiveness at the first follow-up, the study found that children offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 3-year-olds had higher scores on four of eight measures of language and literacy, the single measure of pre-writing, and one of two measures of math skills, than children not offered enrollment as 3-year-olds. Children offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 4-year-olds had higher scores on six of eight measures of language and literacy at the first follow-up than children not offered enrollment as 4-year-olds. There were no significant differences between the groups in pre-writing or math skills. WWC rated the first follow-up analysis as meets WWC evidence standards with reservations. Concerning effectiveness at the later follow-up, the study found no significant differences between the children offered and not offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 3-year-olds on language and literacy, pre-writing, and math skills measured at the second, third, and fourth follow-ups. In addition, there were no significant differences between the children offered and not offered the chance to enroll in Head Start as 4-year-olds on language and literacy and math skills measured at the second and third follow-ups which corresponded to the ends of kindergarten and first grade, respectively. WWC's rating of the second, third and fourth follow-up analysis is meets WWC Evidence Standards.
12/14/2010
REL 2011094 How Prepared are Students for College-Level Reading? Applying a Lexile-Based Approach
This study develops and applies a new methodology to determine the proportion of grade 11 students whose scores on a Texas English language arts and reading assessment indicate their readiness to read and comprehend textbooks used in entry-level English courses in the University of Texas system.
12/6/2010
WWC QRHS0713 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report"
The WWC Quick Review on the "Head Start Impact Study: Final Report" examines the effects of offering the federal program Head Start to preschoolers. Head Start aims to improve the school readiness of low-income children by providing preschool education and health and nutrition services.
7/13/2010
WWC QRSE0615 WWC Quick Review of the Report on Summative Evaluation of the Ready to Learn Initiative
This WWC quick review looks at the report, "Summative Evaluation of the Ready to Learn Initiative." Quick reviews give timely guidance about whether education research in the news meets WWC standards. This study examines whether preschoolers who were exposed to a media-rich literacy curriculum had better early reading skills than preschoolers who were exposed to a media-rich science curriculum. Using a randomized controlled trial, the study included 398 4- and 5-year-olds from low-income households in 47 early childhood centers in New York City and San Francisco.
6/15/2010
WWC 20094066 Helping Students Navigate the Path to College: What High Schools Can Do
Access to higher education remains a challenge for many students who face academic and informational barriers to college entry. This guide targets high schools and school districts, and focuses on effective practices that prepare students academically for college, assist them in completing the steps to college entry, and improve their likelihood of enrolling in college.
9/15/2009
WWC QRHS0309 WWC Quick Review of the Article "Promoting Academic and Social-Emotional School Readiness: The Head Start REDI Program"
The study finds that students in the REDI group outperformed control students on one of three measures of language development (effect sizes ranged from –0.07 to 0.15) and two of three measures of emergent literacy skills (effect sizes ranged from 0.16 to 0.39).
3/31/2009
WWC 20094045 Assisting Students Struggling with Reading: Response to Intervention (RtI) and Multi-Tier Intervention in the Primary Grades
This guide offers five specific recommendations to help educators identify struggling readers and implement evidence-based strategies to promote their reading achievement. Teachers and reading specialists can utilize these strategies to implement RtI and multi-tier intervention methods and frameworks at the classroom or school level. Recommendations cover how to screen students for reading problems, design a multi-tier intervention program, adjust instruction to help struggling readers, and monitor student progress.
2/18/2009
NCES 2008051 Parents’ Reports of the School Readiness of Young Children from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2007
This descriptive report presents initial findings on the school readiness of young children, as reported by their parents, from the School Readiness Survey (PFI) of the 2007 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES). It also incorporates basic demographic information about the population of children ages 3 to 6 who have not yet entered kindergarten, their parents'/guardians' characteristics, and the characteristics of the households in which they live. Topics covered include the participation of young children in preschool or other types of center-based care or education arrangements; parental plans for kindergarten enrollment and parents' beliefs about what they think they should do to prepare their children for school; children’s developmental accomplishments and difficulties, including emerging literacy and numeracy skills; family activities with children in and outside of the home; and children’s television-viewing habits.
8/12/2008
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