Skip Navigation

Search Results: (1-15 of 117 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2019050 ECLS-K:2011 Public-Use Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study that followed a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. This public-use data file includes data from every round of data collection: the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade, and the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
7/12/2019
REL 2019003 Student and school characteristics associated with academic performance and English language proficiency among English learner students in grades 3–8 in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District
Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) has witnessed an increase in the number of English learner students in grades K–12 over recent years, with students coming from more diverse backgrounds in race/ethnicity, countries of origin, and native language. This requires more support from the district to meet diverse needs in terms of languages, cultures, and educational supports. The Cleveland Partnership for English Learner Success—a partnership among CMSD's Multilingual Multicultural Education office, the research office and researchers from Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest—has prioritized identifying English learner student and school characteristics associated with student achievement and language proficiency. This will provide a step toward improving district and school supports for English learner students. Student and school data from 2011/12 through 2016/17 were obtained from the district administrative records. The study examined means and percentages of student and school characteristics and student achievement of English learner students in grades 3–8 from school years 2011/12 through 2016/17. The study team examined these characteristics for English learner students in grades 3–8 each year separately, enabling the team to identify stable patterns while helping to uncover changes over time.
6/11/2019
NCES 2019100 ECLS-K:2011 Restricted-Use Kindergarten-Fifth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study that followed a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. This restricted-use data file includes data from every round of data collection: the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade, and the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
2/22/2019
NCES 2019038 Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2018
This report profiles current conditions and recent trends in the education of students by racial and ethnic group. It presents a selection of indicators that examine differences in educational participation and attainment of students in the racial/ethnic groups of White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Two or more races. The report summarizes data on topics such as demographics; preprimary, elementary, and secondary participation; student achievement; student behaviors and persistence in education, postsecondary education, and outcomes of education.
2/20/2019
NCES 2018086 English Language Program Participation Among Students in the Kindergarten Class of 2010–11: Spring 2011 to Spring 2012
This Statistics in Brief examines differences in the student and school characteristics of kindergartners who participated in instructional programs designed to teach English language skills and students who did not participate in such programs in the kindergarten class of 2010–11. The brief then examines the characteristics of the English language program (e.g., English as a second language, bilingual education, and dual-language education) that participating students were receiving in spring 2011 and changes in participation in these programs between spring 2011 and spring 2012. Data come from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–11 (ECLS-K:2011), a longitudinal study that was designed to follow the same children from kindergarten through fifth grade.
7/17/2018
NCES 2018083 ECLS-K:2011 Restricted-Use Kindergarten-Fourth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study that followed a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students were in fifth grade. This restricted-use data file includes information collected during the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; and the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
5/31/2018
NCES 2018033 ECLS-K:2011 Public-Use Kindergarten-Fourth Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study following a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students are expected to be in fifth grade. This public-use data file includes information collected during the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten; the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade; the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade; the spring of 2014, when most of the students were in third grade; and the spring of 2015, when most of the students were in fourth grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in each year of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
3/27/2018
REL 2018284 Teacher certification and academic growth among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District
This study assesses whether a teacher’s certification type (that is, being a certified bilingual teacher or a certified English as a second language [ESL] teacher) and route to certification—alternative, postbaccalaureate, traditional, or additional exam—correlate with academic growth and growth in English proficiency among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District (HISD). The student sample consisted of HISD students in grades 4 or 5 during the 2005/06–2014/15 school years who were classified as English learner students, participated in HISD's bilingual or ESL program in grades 4 or 5, and had Spanish as their home language. Data from the four most recent cohorts (2011/12–2014/15) were used for the analyses of mathematics and reading outcomes using the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) assessment program. All cohorts were used for the analyses of the English proficiency outcomes using the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System assessment. The corresponding teacher sample consisted of HISD teachers who taught mathematics or reading to the student sample described. The study used student achievement models, sometimes called value-added specifications, to examine whether specific teacher certification types and routes were associated with larger achievement gains.

For math, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 but lower growth in achievement in grade 5 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 math. For reading, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the traditional route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 reading. For English proficiency, having a teacher with bilingual certification through the postbaccalaureate route was associated with the highest student growth in grade 4. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in English proficiency in grade 5.

Given the inconsistent results, there are no clear implications for practice. Additional research might investigate alternate methods for identifying which teachers are effective.
2/13/2018
REL 2018286 Initial Spanish proficiency and English language development among Spanish-speaking English learner students in New Mexico
The purpose of this study was to understand whether differences in initial kindergarten Spanish proficiency for English learner students were linked to disparities in attaining English proficiency and academic achievement in reading and math by grades 4 and 5. The study followed two cohorts of Spanish-speaking English learner students from four districts in New Mexico from kindergarten through grades 4 and 5. The 2010 cohort included students enrolled in kindergarten in 2009/10 and followed through grade 5, and represented 25 percent of the Spanish-speaking English learner students enrolled in bilingual programs in the state. The 2011 cohort included students enrolled in kindergarten in 2010/11 and followed through grade 4, and represented 35 percent of the Spanish-speaking English learner students enrolled in bilingual programs in the state. The descriptive study examined cumulative rates of English learner students progressing toward fluent English proficiency. The study also examined students’ demonstration of grade-level readiness on standardized academic assessments in math and English language arts in grades 4 and 5, particularly for those students who were successfully reclassified to fluent English proficient, and how they compared to state averages at the same grade level. Results were reported out according to three different levels of initial kindergarten Spanish proficiency: low, medium and high. The study found that a considerable portion of English learner students in both cohorts started kindergarten at the lowest English proficiency level, but that results favored students who started kindergarten with high Spanish proficiency. Results also indicated that grade-level readiness for grades 4 and 5 on NMPARCC English language arts and math scores for students who achieved English proficiency in grades 4 and 5 were generally lower than statewide averages for all students. However, students with high kindergarten Spanish proficiency were more likely to have higher English proficiency in kindergarten, to be reclassified to fluent English proficient by grades 4 or 5, and to be demonstrate grade-level readiness in English language arts and math in grades 4 and 5 compared to students with low or medium kindergarten Spanish proficiency levels. Results suggest that differentiated annual targets for English language proficiency progress based on results from the kindergarten Spanish proficiency assessment might produce more accurate annual growth targets for English learner students, and that those Spanish proficiency assessments could serve as a flag for targeting students with a higher risk of struggling to gain English and academic proficiency in elementary school.
1/23/2018
REL 2018280 Time to proficiency for Hispanic English learner students in Texas
This study examined the time it took for English learner students in Texas public schools to reach key educational outcomes for the first time, including attaining English proficiency and satisfactory performance on reading and mathematics state assessments. The study also estimated the probability of attaining these outcomes based on several student characteristics (e.g., initial English language proficiency, receipt of special education services, and being overaged at grade 1 entry) and educational experiences (e.g., the type of English learner program: English as a Second Language or bilingual). Historical data from the Texas Education Agency was used to construct a cohort of Hispanic students who entered Texas public schools in grade 1 as English learner students in the 2005/06 school year (85,611 students). Students were followed for up to eight years, through the 2012/13 school year, including while classified as English learner students and after exit from English learner status. Discrete-time survival analyses were used to estimate the probability of attaining outcomes over time.
11/3/2017
NCES 2017051 Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2017
This report profiles current conditions and recent trends in the education of students by racial and ethnic group. It presents a selection of indicators that examine differences in educational participation and attainment of students in the racial/ethnic groups of White, Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Two or more races. The report summarizes data on topics such as demographics; preprimary, elementary, and secondary participation; student achievement; student behaviors and persistence in education, postsecondary education, and outcomes of education.
7/18/2017
REL 2017261 Are two commonly used early warning indicators accurate predictors of dropout for English learner students? Evidence from six districts in Washington state
This study examined the graduation and dropout rates of current and former English learner students compared to those who had never been English learners in six school districts in the south King County area of Washington state. It also looked at the accuracy of the early warning indicators used to predict dropping out--such as attendance, course failures, and suspensions--for different groups of English learner and non-English learner students. The six districts are part of the Road Map Project, an ambitious cradle-to-career initiative that seeks to double the number of students on track to graduate from college or earn a career credential between 2010 and 2020. As part of the initiative, the districts have been using a common set of early warning indicators since 2011. The authors examined up to eight years of data on a total of 9,595 students who entered high school in 2008/09 in one of the six study districts. This report highlights notable differences in graduation and dropout rates among subgroups of English learner students. It also finds that the early warning indicators used by the six districts were poor predictors of dropout for all students, but particularly for newcomer English learner students. This may be evidence of the importance of selecting and validating indicators specific to the population for which they will be used. Given that the accuracy of the Road Map Project indicators varied for subgroups of English learner students, other states and districts may want to examine the accuracy of their own indicators for different student populations. If early warning indicators are weaker for a specific subgroup of English learner students, then teachers, counselors, and others may want to monitor the needs of that group in other ways.
3/21/2017
REL 2017260 Academic achievement and classification of students from the Freely Associated States in Guam schools
This report from Regional Educational Laboratory Pacific examines academic achievement, English language learner, and special education classification rates for students from the Freely Associated States (FAS) as compared to other students in Guam. To compare FAS and non-FAS academic achievement and English language learner and special education classification rates, REL Pacific used information about students who took the Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition (SAT-10) exams during the 2013/14 school year, the only available dataset that included all variables of interest: performance outcomes, ethnicity, and program classification in Guam schools. The study found that more than 21.0 percent of test takers had an FAS ethnicity, and while few test takers scored at proficient or advanced levels on the SAT-10 sub-tests, FAS students were less likely than non-FAS students to receive a proficient or advanced score across all subtests. In addition, 85 percent of FAS test takers were classified as English learner students, compared to 59.5 percent of non-FAS test takers. However, the percentage of test takers classified as special education was lower for FAS students (4.2 percent) than for non-FAS students (5.8 percent).
3/16/2017
REL 2017255 Stated Briefly: English learner student characteristics and time to reclassification: An example from Washington state
This "Stated Briefly" report is a companion piece that summarizes the findings from another report (REL 2016-128).This study examined how long it typically takes English learner students to become proficient in English and how this time differs by student characteristics, such as gender, home language, or initial proficiency in English. The authors analyzed state data for 16,957 English learner students who entered kindergarten between 2005/06 and 2011/12 in seven cohorts. The students attended seven school districts that comprise the Road Map Project, an initiative designed to double the number of students in South King County (Washington) who are on track to graduate from college or earn a career credential by 2020. The study looked at five language groups in the region, each of which comprises at least 3 percent of the total sample: Spanish, Vietnamese, Somali, Russian and Ukrainian combined, and Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese combined. All other languages, 160 in total, were combined into an "other language" category. The findings show that students who entered kindergarten as English learners took a median of 3.8 years to be reclassified by Washington state as former English learners. Those who entered kindergarten with advanced English language proficiency were more likely to be reclassified than English learner students with basic or intermediate English proficiency. Also, female English learner students were more likely to be reclassified than male English learner students. Speakers of Chinese, Vietnamese, and Russian and Ukrainian were more likely to be reclassified than Somali or Spanish speakers. In addition to contributing to the research base, the study findings may be of interest to state education agencies as they create new targets and standards for English language proficiency. State agencies may wish to consider taking initial English language proficiency into account when determining appropriate targets for federal accountability measures, for example by setting longer expected times to reclassification and providing additional support to students entering school with basic or intermediate levels of English language proficiency. Many states are also implementing new standards for college and career readiness and overhauling their assessment and accountability systems, both of which involve setting additional targets for English learner students. A better understanding of the factors related to variation in time to proficiency may allow states to establish targets that take particular factors, such as initial English language proficiency, into account.
3/7/2017
NCES 2017286 ECLS-K:2011 Public-Use Kindergarten-Second Grade Data File and Electronic Codebook
The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) is a longitudinal study following a nationally representative sample of students from their kindergarten year to the spring of 2016, when most of the students are expected to be in fifth grade. This public-use data file includes information collected during the fall and spring of the 2010-11 school year, when all of the students were in kindergarten, the fall and spring of the 2011-12 school year, when most of the students were in first grade, and the fall and spring of the 2012-13 school year, when most of the students were in second grade. The file includes information collected from the students, their parents/guardians, their teachers, and their school administrators in the first two years of the study. It also includes information collected in the spring of 2011 from their kindergarten-year before- and after-school care providers.
3/1/2017
   1 - 15     Next >>
Page 1  of  8