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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2015015 Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972-2012
This report updates a series of NCES reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. The report draws on an array of nationally representative surveys and administrative datasets to present statistics on high school dropout and completion rates. The report includes national estimates of the percentage of students who drop out in a given 12-month period (event dropout rates), the percentage of young people in a specified age range who are high school dropouts (status dropout rates), and the percentage of young people in a specified age range who hold high school credentials (status completion rates). In addition, the report includes state-level data on event dropout rates and the percentage of students who graduate within four years of starting ninth grade (adjusted cohort graduation rates). Data are presented by a number of characteristics including race/ethnicity, sex, and socioeconomic status.
6/25/2015
REL 2015079 Early Identification of High School Graduation Outcomes in Oregon Leadership Network Schools
The purpose of this study was to examine student characteristics related to completing high school within four years, with particular emphasis on graduation outcomes for male and English language learner students. The authors looked at a cohort of students who began grade 9 in the 2007/08 school year in four Oregon districts. Factors related to three key graduation outcomes were analyzed: dropping out within four years of starting grade 9, graduating on time (within four years), and staying in school but not graduating on time. Findings confirmed previous studies showing that attendance and grade point average (GPA) in grades 8 and 9 are significantly associated with graduating on time. In addition, race/ethnicity and achievement on standardized tests are less predictive of graduating on time after other factors are considered. When the influence of demographic, behavioral, and academic characteristics were considered at the same time, only gender, status as an English language learner, and attendance and GPA in grades 8 and 9 were associated with graduation outcomes. Practitioners and policymakers concerned with early identification of students at-risk of not graduating on time could consider these early warning indicators: grade 8 attendance rates below 80 percent; grade 8 GPA of less than 2.0; grade 9 attendance rates below 80 percent, and grade 9 GPA of less than 2.0.
4/29/2015
NCES 2014391 Public High School Four-Year On-Time Graduation Rates and Event Dropout Rates: School Years 2010–11 and 2011–12
This report includes four-year on-time graduation rates and dropout rates for school years 2010-11 and 2011-12. A four-year on-time graduation rate provides measure of the percent of students that successfully complete high school in 4-years with a regular high school diploma. This report includes national and state-level Averaged Freshman Graduation Rates, which NCES has been producing for many years as an estimator for on-time graduation. New to this year’s report, NCES builds off the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education’s release of state-level Regulatory Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate data required under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
4/28/2014
NCES 2013399REV Data File: Common Core of Data Local Education Agency Universe Survey Graduation Restricted-Use Data File: School Year 2009-10, version 1a
This Restricted-use data file publishes data on high school completers at the local education agency (LEA) or school district level. These data were collected as part of the Common Core of Data (CCD) component of the Department of Education's Education Data Exchange Network (EDEN) Collection System. The High School Dropout count, rate, and associated enrollment are provided on this file. High school completion totals are presented for both regular high school diploma recipients and for other high school completers. The Average Freshman Graduation Rate, and the components needed to compute this rate are also provided.
10/18/2013
NCES 2013309REV Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2009–10
This report presents the number of high school graduates, the Averaged Freshman Graduation Rate (AFGR), and the dropout data for grades 9–12 for public schools in school year 2009–10 as reported by State Education Agencies to the NCES Common Core of Data Universe Survey of public elementary and secondary institutions.
1/22/2013
NCES 2012046 Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study
The Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study is a congressionally-mandated statistical report that documents the scope and nature of gaps in access and persistence in higher education by sex and race/ethnicity. The report presents 46 indicators grouped under seven main topic areas: (1) demographic context; (2) characteristics of schools; (3) student behaviors and afterschool activities; (4) academic preparation and achievement; (5) college knowledge; (6) postsecondary education; and (7) postsecondary outcomes and employment. In addition, the report contains descriptive multivariate analyses of variables that are associated with male and female postsecondary attendance and attainment.
8/28/2012
REL 2012134 Using the Freshman On-Track Indicator to Predict Graduation in Two Urban Districts in the Midwest Region
This report examines how well the freshman on-track indicator developed by the Consortium on Chicago School Research predicts on-time graduation in two urban districts in the Midwest Region. This indicator classifies students at the end of the first year of high school as on-track or off-track to graduate based on grade 9 course credits earned and failures.

REL Midwest examined on-track and off-track rates and for recent freshman cohorts as well as 4-year graduation rates for on-track and off-track students.

Key findings include:
  • For both districts, students who were on track at the end of grade 9 graduated on time at a higher rate than did students who were off track. This was the case both overall and for student subgroups based on gender, race/ethnicity, special education status, free or reduced-price lunch status, age, and proficiency level on grade 8 state math and reading assessments.
  • For the 2005/06 cohort, the on-time graduation rate in District A was 80.7 percent for on-track students and 30.2 percent for off-track students; in District B, it was 91 percent for on-track students and 45 percent for off-track students.
  • On-track status was a significant predictor of on-time graduation, even after controlling for student background characteristics and grade 8 achievement test scores. The effect size for on-track status was larger than the effect sizes for any student background characteristic and for achievement test scores.
4/25/2012
WWC IRLHS12 High School Puente Program
The High School Puente Program has three components: writing, counseling, and mentoring. Students in the ninth and tenth grades receive rigorous writing practice through college preparatory English classes. The curriculum includes Mexican-American/Latino and other multicultural literature. The counseling component of the High School Puente Program guides students in identifying career goals, developing short- and long-term education plans, and applying to four-year colleges. The mentoring component provides student leadership opportunities and structured mentoring activities with volunteers from the local community.

The WWC identified 27 studies of the High School Puente Program for adolescent learners that were published or released between 1989 and 2011, none of which meet WWC evidence standards. Therefore, the WWC is unable to draw any conclusions based on research about the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the High School Puente Program on the literacy outcomes of adolescent learners. Additional research is needed to determine the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of the program for adolescent literacy.
4/17/2012
WWC QRTH0112 WWC Quick Review of the Report "Transforming the High School Experience: How New York City’s New Small Schools Are Boosting Student Achievement and Graduation Rates"
The study examined whether winning an admissions lottery for a small school of choice improved high school students' progress toward graduation and graduation rates.
1/31/2012
NCES 2012006 Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972–2009
This report updates a series of NCES reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. The report includes national and regional population estimates for the percentage of students who dropped out of high school between 2008 and 2009, the percentage of young people who were dropouts in 2009, and the percentage of young people who were not in high school and had some form of high school credential in 2009. Data are presented by a number of characteristics including race/ethnicity, sex, and age. Annual data for these population estimates are provided for the 1972-2009 period. Information about the high school class of 2009 is also presented in the form on on-time graduation rates from public high schools.
10/13/2011
NCES 2011034 The Condition of Education 2011 in Brief
The Condition of Education 2011 in Brief contains a summary of 12 of the 50 indicators in The Condition of Education 2011. The topics covered include: enrollment trends by age; student achievement from the National Assessment of Educational Progress in reading and mathematics; international reading, mathematics, and science literacy; annual earnings of young adults; public high school graduation rates; status dropout rates; immediate transition to college; postsecondary graduation rates; students in high-poverty schools; characteristics of postsecondary institutions; and degrees earned.
5/26/2011
NCES 2011312 Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2008–09
This report presents findings associated with public high school graduation and event dropout counts for the 2008–09 school year. These data were collected as part of the Common Core of Data Survey Collection, a universe collection of public schools operating in the United States and associated other jurisdictions.
5/3/2011
NCES 2011012 Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972–2008
This report builds upon a series of National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) reports on high school dropout, completion, and graduation rates that began in 1988. The report includes discussions of many rates used to study how students complete or fail to complete high school. It presents estimates of rates for 2008 and provides data about trends in dropout and completion rates over the last three and a half decades (1972-2008) along with more recent estimates of on-time graduation from public high schools. Among findings in the report was that in October 2008, approximately 3 million civilian noninstitutionalized 16- through 24-year-olds were not enrolled in high school and had not earned a high school diploma or alternative credential. These dropouts represented 8 percent of the 38 million non-institutionalized, civilian individuals in this age group living in the United States.
12/8/2010
NCES 2011301 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2008-09
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nation's largest public school districts in the 2008-09 school year. The data include such characteristics as the number of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Findings include: In 2008-09, these 100 largest districts enrolled 22 percent of all public school students, and employed 22 percent of all public school teachers. The districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2007-08. Three states -- California, Florida, and Texas -- accounted for almost half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2008 ranged from a low of $6,363 in the Granite District, Utah to a high of $23,298 in Boston, Massachusetts.
11/4/2010
NCES 2010349 Characteristics of the 100 Largest Public Elementary and Secondary School Districts in the United States: 2007-08
This annual report provides basic information from the Common Core of Data about the nation's largest public school districts in the 2007-08 school year. The data include such characteristics as the number of students and teachers, number of high school completers and the averaged freshman graduation rate, and revenues and expenditures. Findings include: In 2007-08, these 100 largest districts enrolled 22 percent of all public school students, and employed 21 percent of all public school teachers. The districts produced 20 percent of all high school completers (both diploma and other completion credential recipients) in 2006-07. Three states -- California, Florida, and Texas -- accounted for almost half of the 100 largest public school districts. Current per-pupil expenditures in fiscal year 2007 ranged from a low of $5,886 in the Alpine District, Utah to a high of $21,801 in Boston, Massachusetts.
7/27/2010
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