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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCEE 20134001 Evaluation of the Content Literacy Continuum: Report on Program Impacts, Program Fidelity, and Contrast
This study examines impacts of the Content Literacy Continuum (CLC) on high school students' reading comprehension and accumulation of credits in core subject areas. The Content Literacy Continuum (CLC) combines whole-school and targeted approaches to supporting student literacy and content learning, using instructional routines and learning strategies developed by the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning. The study used a randomized design and involved 33 high schools in nine school districts within four Midwestern states. The study found no statistically significant impacts of CLC on reading comprehension or accumulation of core credits.
12/19/2012
NCEE 20124043 Does a Summer Reading Program Based on Lexiles Affect Reading Comprehension?
For report NCEE 2012-4006 Does a Summer Reading Program Based on Lexiles Affect Reading Comprehension? http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=295

This data file contains data from a randomized control trial that examined the whether sending students eight free books over the summer impacted their reading comprehension scores in the fall. The study found that the summer reading program did not have a statistically significant impact on student reading comprehension. The baseline sample consisted of 1,785 students (896 treatment and 889 control) in 112 schools. Eighty-eight percent of students in both groups (791 treatment and 780 control) completed the SRI, yielding a final analytic sample of 1,571 students. Eighty-four percent of students in the treatment group (n=750) and 83 percent in the control group (n=734) completed the summer reading survey.
11/26/2012
NCEE 20124041 The Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI)
For report NCEE 2012-4008 Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=69

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized trial examined the impact of the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) on student’s mathematical problem solving and science achievement. The study also examined the effects on teacher's classroom practice and active learning instructional strategies. The study found AMSTI had a positive and statistically significant effect on classroom practices in mathematics and science after one year. The study found small, but statistically significant gains in student achievement in mathematics, but no effect in science achievement. The sample includes 82 schools, with about 780 teachers and 30,000 students in grades 4–8.
11/26/2012
NCEE 20104014 Effectiveness of a Program to Accelerate Vocabulary Development in Kindergarten (VOCAB)
For report NCEE 2012-4005 Effectiveness of a Program to Accelerate Vocabulary Development in Kindergarten (VOCAB) http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=67 and NCEE 2012-4009 Effectiveness of a Program to Accelerate Vocabulary Development in Kindergarten (VOCAB): First Grade Follow-up Impact Report and Exploratory Analyses of Kindergarten Impacts http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=289

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized trial that examined the K-PAVE program’s effectiveness support the acquisition of vocabulary in young students. The study found that students who received the K-PAVE intervention were one month ahead of students in the control group in academic knowledge at the end of kindergarten, but did not find any statistically significant impacts of K-PAVE at the end of grade 1 on expressive vocabulary, academic knowledge, or passage comprehension. The final sample included 65 schools, including the 33 schools with complete written consent as of July, 24, 2008, and the 32 schools that had complete written consent as of August 7, 2008. The sample included 31 intervention and 34 control schools.
11/26/2012
NCEE 20124036 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation
For report NCEE 2010-4035 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=REL20104035

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized trial examined the impact of the Thinking Reader program on student vocabulary and reading comprehension. The study found no direct causal evidence supporting Thinking Reader’s effectiveness. The final analysis included 90 teachers and a minimum of 2,140 students (89% of the overall baseline sample, 90% of the intervention group, and 88% of the control group).
11/26/2012
NCEE 20124031 The Effects of Connected Mathematics 2 on Math Achievement in Grade 6 in the Mid-Atlantic Region
For report NCEE 2012-4017 The Effects of Connected Mathematics 2 on Math Achievement in Grade 6 in the Mid-Atlantic Region http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/projects/project.asp?ProjectID=25.

This data file contains data from a cluster randomized to evaluate the effect of CMP2 on the mathematics achievement of grade 6 students. The study found no statistically significant impact on TerraNova posttest scores. The final analysis included 65 schools, including 5,677 students for the TerraNova and 5,584 for the PTV. This was 82 percent of the eligible students (students enrolled in a regular grade 6 mathematics class in a study school at the time of pretest) for the TerraNova at posttest and 80 percent of the eligible students for the PTV at pretest.
11/26/2012
NCEE 20124019 Using an Experimental Evaluation of Charter Schools to Test Whether Nonexperimental Comparison Group Methods Can Replicate Experimental Impact Estimates

This NCEE Technical Methods Paper compares the estimated impacts of the offer of charter school enrollment using an experimental design and a non-experimental comparison group design. The study examined four different approaches to creating non-experimental comparison groups ordinary least squares regression modeling, exact matching, propensity score matching, and fixed effects modeling. The data for the study are from students in the districts and grades that were represented in an experimental design evaluation of charter schools conducted by the U.S. Department of Education in 2010 (For more information, see: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104029/index.asp)

The study found that none of the comparison group designs reliably replicated the impact estimates from the experimental design study. However, the use of pre-intervention baseline data that are strongly predictive of the key outcome measures considerably reduced, but did not eliminate the estimated bias in the non-experimental impact estimates. Estimated impacts based on matched comparison groups were more similar to the experimental estimators than were the estimates based on the regression adjustments alone, the differences are moderate in size, although not statistically significant.

4/26/2012
NCEE 20124025 Replicating Experimental Impact Estimates Using a Regression Discontinuity Approach
This NCEE Technical Methods Paper compares the estimated impacts of an educational intervention using experimental and regression discontinuity (RD) study designs. The analysis used data from two large-scale randomized controlled trials—the Education Technology Evaluation and the Teach for America Study—to provide evidence on the performance of RD estimators in two specific contexts. More generally, the report presents and implements a method for examining the performance of RD estimators that could be used in other contexts. The study found that the RD and experimental designs produced impact estimates that were meaningful in size, though not significantly different from one another. The study also found that manipulation of the assignment variable in RD designs can substantially influence RD impact estimates, particularly if manipulation is related to the outcome and occurs close to the assignment variable's cutoff value.
4/25/2012
NCEE 20124051 Moving Teachers: Implementation of Transfer Incentives in Seven Districts
A new report describes implementation and intermediate impacts of an intervention designed to provide incentives to induce a school district's highest-performing teachers to work in its lowest-achieving schools. The report, "Moving Teachers: Implementation of Transfer Incentives in Seven Districts," uses random assignment within each district to form two equivalent groups of classrooms at the same grade level ("teacher teams"), a treatment group that had the chance to participate in the intervention and a control group that did not. Analyses include 90 vacancy pairs and 86 schools in the 7 study districts.

Data for this report were collected on program implementation and teacher- and principal-reported behaviors and perceptions.
4/3/2012
REL 20124013 Effects of Curriculum and Teacher Professional Development on the Language Proficiency of Elementary English Language Learner Students in the Central Region
This study is a randomized controlled trial examining the impact on student English language proficiency of the On Our Way to English (OWE> curriculum, offered in combination with the Responsive Instruction for Success in English (RISE) teacher professional development.

On Our Way to English was developed to provide ELL students access to English oral language development, comprehensive literacy instruction, and standards-based content area information in science and social studies. Responsive Instruction for Success in English (RISE) complements the OWE classroom program with professional development to understand the content of OWE, the rationale for its structure, and practical strategies for its use.

The study found that the combination of OWE and RISE did not have a statistically significant effect on students’ acquisition of English, teacher-reported student engagement, instructional practices, or assessment practices.
4/3/2012
REL 20124006 Does a Summer Reading Program Based on Lexiles Affect Reading Comprehension?
To successfully engage in today’s global market, students need advanced literacy skills (Snow, Burns, and Griffin 1998). A lack of proficiency in reading is more widely found in children from economically disadvantaged families (Alexander, Entwisle, and Olson 2007; Lee, Grigg, and Donahue 2007); in fact, by grade 4, only 46 percent of students from economically disadvantaged families achieve reading proficiency above the basic level (Perie, Grigg, & Donahue, 2005). One reason that these students tend to have lower reading proficiency is that they experience a decline in reading comprehension over the summer months, known as summer reading loss (Cooper et al. 1996; David 1979). This disproportionate reading loss for economically disadvantaged students may, in part, be explained by the limited access to books and literacy-related activities in the home environment that many of these students experience.
3/7/2012
REL 20124007 An Evaluation of Number Rockets: A Tier-2 Intervention for Grade 1Students at Risk for Difficulties in Mathematics
The 2004 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) approved schools’ use of alternative methods for determining student eligibility for special education services. IDEA encourages schools to intervene as soon as there is a valid indication that a student might experience academic difficulties, rather than after performance falls well below grade-level. The Response to Intervention (RtI) framework is an approach for providing instructional support to students at risk for these difficulties.
2/14/2012
REL 20124014 A Study of the Effectiveness of a School Improvement Intervention (Success in Sight)
Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 and its adequate yearly progress (AYP) requirements, the nation’s education systems have increased their focus on school improvement interventions that build school and teacher capacity to increase student achievement in reading and mathematics. Despite the intensified focus on school improvement, only 70 percent of schools made AYP in reading and mathematics in 2008 (U.S. Department of Education 2008a). Failing to make AYP in reading or mathematics has important implications for schools, such as risk of closure or restructuring. The challenges preventing low-performing schools from making AYP are rarely singular or simple and call for proven systemic and sustainable interventions.
2/8/2012
NCEE 20124015 Whether and How to Use State Tests to Measure Student Achievement in a Multi-State Randomized Experiment: An Empirical Assessment Based on Four Recent Evaluations
An important question for educational evaluators is how best to measure academic achievement, the outcome of primary interest in many studies. In large-scale evaluations, student achievement has typically been measured by administering a common standardized test to all students in the study (a “study-administered test”). In the era of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), however, state assessments have become an increasingly viable source of information on student achievement. Using state tests scores can yield substantial cost savings for the study and can eliminate the burden of additional testing on students and teaching staff. On the other hand, state tests can also pose certain difficulties: their content may not be well aligned with the outcomes targeted by the intervention and variation in the content and scale of the tests can complicate pooling scores across states and grades.

This NCEE Reference Report, Whether and How to Use State Tests to Measure Student Achievement in a Multi-State Randomized Experiment: An Empirical Assessment Based on Four Recent Evaluations, examines the sensitivity of impact findings to (1) the type of assessment used to measure achievement (state tests or a study-administered test); and (2) analytical decisions about how to pool state test data across states and grades. These questions are examined using data from four recent IES-funded experimental design studies that measured student achievement using both state tests and a study-administered test. Each study spans multiple states and two of the studies span several grade levels.
10/12/2011
REL 20104035 Impact of the Thinking Reader Software Program on Grade 6 Reading Vocabulary, Comprehension, Strategies, and Motivation: Final Report
Improving adolescent literacy is a critical step toward improving adolescent academic achievement (Kamil , Borman, Dole, Kral, Salinger, & Torgesen, 2008). "Adolescent literacy" commonly refers to the skills that students in Grades 4–12 need in order to successfully learn by reading, as opposed to learning how to read, which is emphasized in earlier grades (Kamil, 2003; Kamil et al., 2008; National Governors Association, 2005). Recent policy reports emphasize the need to build students' reading vocabulary and comprehension skills to meet the increased literacy demands that begin in Grade 4 (Carnegie Council on Advancing Adolescent Literacy, 2010; Meltzer, Smith, & Clark, 2001). Experts who drafted the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts have emphasized that students must show a steadily increasing ability to discern more from text to become successful readers (National Governors Association & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010). The current study evaluates an intervention (Thinking Reader®) designed to improve middle school students’ reading vocabulary and comprehension (Tom Snyder Productions, 2006a). It responds to an interest expressed by stakeholders to the Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast and Islands in improving literacy outcomes for students beyond elementary school.
4/4/2011
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