Skip Navigation

Publications & Products

Search Results: (1-8 of 8 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2021051 District Changes in Student Achievement and Local Practice under Georgia’s District and School Flexibility Policy
Georgia instituted a flexibility policy in 2007 that provided districts with waivers from state education rules, provisions, and guidelines. Granted waivers and annual accountability targets are agreed upon in district performance contracts with the state. The performance contracts are meant to encourage districts to implement innovative practices to increase achievement for all students in Georgia. Between 2008/09 and 2016/17, 178 of Georgia’s 180 districts entered into performance contracts with the state. The Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) asked Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast to analyze how districts’ achievement changed after the start of their performance contracts and factors related to those changes. GaDOE also requested information on districts’ implementation of and experiences with the state’s flexibility policy, focusing on how districts have used their performance contracts to prioritize local innovations in practice. Overall, the study found little evidence of that changes in academic achievement coincided with performance contract adoption but significant variation in changes in achievement across districts, after adjusting for other factors. Changes in achievement were largely unrelated to district characteristics, including urbanicity, timing of performance contract adoption, and district type, as well as features of the performance contract. District leaders indicated prioritizing innovations related to college and career readiness, teacher certification requirements, instructional spending, and funding for school improvement. Leaders perceived broad benefits from the priority innovations they identified, especially in relation to staff and school climate, but they also indicated that, in many cases, waivers were not required to implement the innovations they identified as priorities. Despite the perceived benefits, changes in achievement were largely unrelated to the academic, human resources, and financial innovations that districts indicated prioritizing after implementing their performance contracts.
12/17/2020
NCEE 20154000 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: An Early Look at Applicants and Participating Schools Under the SOAR Act
This report explores implementation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) in the first two years after Congress reauthorized it with some changes under the SOAR Act of 2011. Key findings include the following: (1) Just over half of all DC private schools participated in the OSP, with current schools more likely to have published tuition rates above the OSP scholarship amounts than did participating schools in the past; (2) OSP applicants under the SOAR Act represent between three and four percent of the estimated 53,000 children in DC who meet the eligibility criterion; (3) A number of awarded scholarships go unused, with students from disadvantaged schools and families using awarded scholarships at lower rates than others.
10/7/2014
WWC SSR232 WWC Review of the Report "The Short-Term Effects of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship on Student Outcomes"
Researchers examined the impacts of the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship program on academic and behavioral outcomes of students in grades 9–12 in Kalamazoo Public Schools (KPS). The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship program offers college scholarships to graduating high school students in the KPS district. The percentage of tuition and fees covered is dependent on how long a student has attended school in the district. Students attending since kindergarten receive the full 100% of tuition and fees. Students attending since ninth grade receive a scholarship covering 65%. Students who enter KPS in tenth grade or later are not eligible to receive the scholarship. To assess the program’s impacts, researchers compared the academic and behavioral outcomes of students in high school, before and after the Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship program was introduced. Student outcomes that were included in the study were: student grade point averages, whether students earned course credits, the number of course credits earned, incidence of and number of days spent in suspension, and incidence of and number of days spent in in-school detention. This study uses a quasi-experimental design in which baseline equivalence of the groups cannot be demonstrated. Therefore, the research does not meet WWC group design standards.
8/26/2014
WWC SSR20002 WWC Review of the Report "Can Scholarships Alone Help Students Succeed? Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges"
The 2012 study, Can Scholarships Alone Help Students Succeed? Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges, examined the effects of performance-based scholarships on 1,502 low-income, independent, adult community college students in New York City who were required to enroll in remedial courses. The students were targeted because of their elevated risk of having financial difficulties in paying for college. The study authors used student transcript data to evaluate the impact of the scholarships on continued community college enrollment, credits earned, and grade-point average. This study is a well-implemented randomized controlled trial, and the research meets WWC evidence standards without reservations.
6/4/2013
WWC QR0113 Can Scholarships Alone Help Students Succeed? Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges
The study examined the effects of performance-based scholarships for low-income community college students (ages 22–35) who were required to enroll in remedial courses. The study evaluated the impact of the scholarships on continued community college enrollment, credits attempted and earned, and cumulative grade-point average (GPA). All study subjects were eligible for Pell Grants.
1/16/2013
NCES 2011218 Trends in Student Financing of Undergraduate Education: Selected Years, 1995–96 to 2007–08
Drawing on the 1995–96, 1999–2000, 2003–04, and 2007–08 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), these Web Tables present trends in financial aid that was awarded to undergraduate students attending postsecondary institutions in the United States. Data include price of attendance, tuition and fees, type of financial aid received from federal, state, and institutional sources, net price of attendance (price minus all grants), out-of-pocket net price (price minus all aid), and financial need. These are shown by enrollment and demographic characteristics such as sex, race/ethnicity, age, dependency status, family income, attendance status, and type of institution attended.
1/12/2011
NCEE 20104018 Evaluation of the Impact of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: Final Report
The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) is the first federally funded voucher program in the United States, providing scholarships of up to $7,500 for low-income residents of the District of Columbia to send their children to local participating private schools.

The congressionally mandated evaluation of the Program compared the outcomes of about 2,300 eligible applicants randomly assigned to receive or not receive an OSP scholarship through a series of lotteries in 2004 and 2005. This final report finds that the Program had mixed longer-term effects on participating students and their parents, including:
  • No conclusive evidence that the OSP affected student achievement overall, or for the high-priority group of students who applied from "schools in need of improvement."
  • The Program significantly improved students' chances of graduating from high school, according to parent reports. Overall, 82 percent of students offered scholarships received a high school diploma, compared to 70 percent of those who applied but were not offered scholarships. This graduation rate improvement also held for the subgroup of OSP students who came from "schools in need of improvement."
  • Although parents had higher satisfaction and rated schools as safer if their child was offered or used an OSP scholarship, students reported similar ratings for satisfaction and safety regardless of whether they were offered or used a scholarship.
The evaluation also found that the cumulative loss of students between 2004 and 2009 from DC Public Schools (DCPS) to the Program was about 3 percent. In contrast, an estimated 20 percent of students annually change schools or leave DCPS. Thus, OSP-related transfers to private schools may not have been distinguishable from the larger share of other student departures.
6/22/2010
NCEE 20134004 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program

For report NCEE 2010-4018 Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104018/index.asp.

The DC Opportunity Scholarship Program is the first federally funded voucher program in the United States. A congressionally-mandated evaluation of the effectiveness of the program was conducted with two cohorts of applicants (spring 2004 and spring 2005) who entered lotteries to determine whether they would receive a private school scholarship. These approximately 23000 students were administered academic assessments and they and their parents, along with DC public and private school principals, were surveyed over four years about their experiences. These data were released along with the final report (http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20104018/index.asp).

6/1/2010
   1 - 8