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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2007169 Persistence and Attainment of 2003-04 Beginning Postsecondary Students: After Three Years
This First Look report provides a brief description of the persistence and degree attainment of a nationally representative sample of students who began postsecondary education for the first time in the 2003-04 academic year. The report provides a first look at the experience of these students over three academic years, from July 2003 to June 2006, and provides information about rates of program completion, transfer, and attrition for students who first enrolled at various types of postsecondary institutions using data from the 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06). Findings showed that among the beginning students who were recent (2003) high school graduates, enrolled full time in the fall of 2003, and had bachelor’s degree plans, 70 percent were still enrolled at their first institution without a degree, 4 percent had attained a degree or certificate at their first institution, and 20 percent had transferred elsewhere without a degree by June 2006.
8/15/2007
NCES 2007017 Digest of Education Statistics, 2006
The 42nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
7/26/2007
NCES 2007165 Part-Time Undergraduates in Postsecondary Education: 2003–04
This report uses data from the 2003–04 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2004) to profile part-time undergraduates enrolled in U.S. postsecondary institutions in 2003–04. About 49 percent of undergraduates were enrolled exclusively full time in the 2003–04 academic year, 35 percent were enrolled exclusively part time, and 16 percent had mixed enrollment intensity. Part-time undergraduates, especially exclusively part-time students, were at a distinct disadvantage relative to those who were enrolled full time: they came from minority and low-income family backgrounds; they were not as well-prepared for college as their full-time peers; they were highly concentrated in 2-year colleges and nondegree/certificate programs; and many of them worked full time while enrolled and were not enrolled continuously. Using longitudinal data from the 1996/01 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01), the report also found that part-time enrollment was negatively associated with persistence and degree completion six years after beginning postsecondary education even after controlling for a wide range of factors related to these outcomes. This was the case even for the group of students with characteristics that fit the typical profile of a full-time student (i.e., age 23 or younger, financially dependent on parents, graduated from high school with a regular diploma, and received financial help from parents to pay for postsecondary education). Regardless of whether they resembled full-time students, part-time students (especially exclusively part-time students) lagged behind their full-time peers in terms of their postsecondary outcomes even after controlling for a variety of related factors.
6/27/2007
NCES 2007064 The Condition of Education 2007
The Condition of Education 2007 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 48 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on high school coursetaking. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2007 print edition includes 48 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.
5/31/2007
NCES 2007162 The Path Through Graduate School: A Longitudinal Examination 10 Years After Bachelor’s Degree
The report uses longitudinal data from the 1992–93 Baccalaureate and Beyond Study (B&B:93/03) to examine the characteristics related to graduate degree enrollment, persistence, and completion among 1992–93 bachelor’s degree recipients. About 40 percent of 1992–93 bachelor’s degree recipients had enrolled in a graduate degree program by 2003. On average, most students waited between 2 and 3 years to enroll for the first time in a graduate degree program, and among those who enrolled between 1993 and 2003, some 62 percent had earned at least one graduate degree by 2003. Master’s degree students took an average of 3 years to complete their degree, first-professional students took about 4 years, and doctoral students took more than 5 years. After controlling for a wide range of relevant variables, several enrollment characteristics retained a significant relationship with graduate degree persistence and completion. Rates of persistence and completion were higher among students who entered graduate school immediately after earning a bachelor’s degree, who attended full time and enrolled continuously, and who enrolled in multiple graduate degree programs.
3/6/2007
NCES 2006030 Digest of Education Statistics, 2005
The 41st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons. Some examples of highlights from the report include the following items. Enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools rose 22 percent between 1985 and 2005. The fastest public school growth occurred in the elementary grades (prekindergarten through grade 8), where enrollment rose 24 percent over this period, from 27.0 million to 33.5 million. Public secondary school enrollment declined 8 percent from 1985 to 1990, but then rose 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, for a net increase of 20 percent. The number of public school teachers has risen faster than the number of students over the past 10 years, resulting in declines in the pupil/teacher ratio. Between 1994 and 2004, the number of full-time college students increased by 30 percent compared to an 8 percent increase in part-time students. During the same time period, the number of men enrolled rose 16 percent, while the number of women enrolled increased by 25 percent.
8/10/2006
NCES 2006184 Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Education Institutions: 2003-04, With a Special Analysis of Community College Students
This report is the fifth in a series of reports that accompany the release of the data from the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS). This report includes an analysis of community college students, examining the relationship between a measure of students’ degree commitment and their likelihood of maintaining their enrollment over the 1-year period under study. The study developed a taxonomy called the Community College Track, which classifies students’ degree commitment (more, less, or not committed) based on their reported intentions of completing a program of study (transfer, associates degree, certificate, or no degree) and their attendance status (at least half time or not) within their program of study. Overall, some 49 percent of community college students were classified as “more committed,” 39 percent as “less committed” and 12 percent as “not committed.” The two largest groups were students classified as “more committed” in transfer programs (29 percent) and “less committed” in general associate’s degree programs (17 percent). The results indicate that students who demonstrate a relatively strong commitment to completing a program of study (i.e., they explicitly report that either transfer or degree completion are reasons for attending and they attend classes at least half time) are very likely to maintain their enrollment for one year. Some 83 percent of the “more committed” students did so, compared with 70 percent of “less committed” and 58 percent of those designated as “not committed.”
6/21/2006
NCES 2006071 The Condition of Education 2006
The Condition of Education 2006 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 50 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis on international assessments. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2006 print edition includes 50 indicators in five main areas: (1) participation in education; (2) learner outcomes; (3) student effort and educational progress; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education; and (5) the contexts of postsecondary education.
6/1/2006
NCES 200601 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06) Field Test Methodology Report
This report describes the methodology and findings for the field test of the 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06). These students, who started their postsecondary education during the 2002-03 academic year, were first interviewed as part of the 2004 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:04) field test. BPS:04/06 is the first follow-up of this cohort. The BPS:04/06 field test was used to plan, implement, and evaluate methodological procedures, instruments, and systems proposed for use in the full-scale study scheduled for the 2005-06 school year. The report provides the sampling design and methodologies used in the field test. It also describes data collection outcomes, including response rates, interview burden, and results of incentive and prompting experiments. In addition, the report provides details on the evaluation of data quality for reliability of responses, item nonresponse, and question delivery and data entry error. Recommendations for the full-scale study are provided for the sampling design, locating and tracing procedures, interviewer training, data collection, and instrumentation.
5/17/2006
NCES 2006005 Digest of Education Statistics, 2004
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
10/12/2005
NCES 2005108 Status and Trends in the Education of American Indians and Alaska Natives
This report examines both the current conditions and recent trends in the education of American Indians and Alaska Natives using statistical measures. It presents a selection of indicators that illustrate the educational achievement and attainment of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Over the past 20 years, American Indians/Alaska Natives have made gains in key education areas, such as increased educational attainment. However, gaps in academic performance between American Indian/ Alaska Native and White students remain.
8/25/2005
NCES 2005152 Waiting to Attend College: Undergraduates Who Delay Their Postsecondary Enrollment
This report describes the characteristics and outcomes of students who delay enrollment in postsecondary education. It covers the ways in which the demographic, enrollment, and attendance patterns of students who delay postsecondary enrollment differ from their peers who enroll immediately after high school graduation. In addition, the report discusses how students who delay a shorter amount of time differ from those who delay longer. It is based on data from the 2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000), the 2000 follow-up of the National Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88/2000), and the 2001 follow-up of the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:96/01). Delayed entrants began their postsecondary education at a significant disadvantage compared to those who enrolled immediately after high school with regard to family income, parental education, academic preparation, time spent working while enrolled, and course of study. While only a quarter of those who delayed entry first enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs, over half of those who enrolled immediately did so. Further, 40 percent of delayed entrants earned some kind of postsecondary credential compared with 58 percent of immediate entrants.
6/16/2005
NCES 2005094 The Condition of Education 2005
The Condition of Education 2005 summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report presents 40 indicators on the status and condition of education and a special analysis of the mobility of elementary and secondary school teachers. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2005 print edition includes 40 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from elementary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the contexts of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the contexts of postsecondary education; and (6) societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels.
6/1/2005
NCES 2005157 The Road Less Traveled? Students Who Enroll in Multiple Institutions
This report profiles students who attended multiple institutions - specifically those who co-enrolled (attended more than one institution simultaneously), transferred, or attended 2-year institutions. It looks at the extent to which undergraduates attend multiple institutions as well as the relationship between student' rates of multiple institution attendance and their persistence, attainment, and time to degree. Analysis is based on data from the 1996-01 Beginning Postsecondary Student Study and the 2000-01 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study. The study found that attending more than one institution during the course of undergraduate enrollment is a common practice. Among students enrolling for the first time in 1995/96, 40 percent had attended more than one institution as of 2001, while among 1999/2000 college graduates, nearly 60 percent had done so.Among those same graduates, transferring and co-enrolling were associated with longer average times to completion.
5/31/2005
NCES 2005160 Feasibility of a Student Unit Record System Within the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System
This report describes the feasibility of collecting individual enrollment and financial aid information for each student in postsecondary education. NCES held three public meetings with key stakeholders from institutions, states and other interested parties to get feedback on such issues as burden, cost, and privacy, and to solicit information on other technical aspects of developing such a unit record system. This report details the issues discussed in these meetings. This feasibility study is an important step to determine the problems that may be encountered and the issues to be addressed if Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System were redesigned to replace five current IPEDS surveys with a unit record system.
3/21/2005
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