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Search Results: (1-5 of 5 records)

 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCEE 2021003 Drawing across school boundaries: How federally-funded magnet schools recruit and admit students
A key goal of many magnet programs is to improve student diversity in schools. This snapshot, based on surveys completed by most of the more than 160 schools recently funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) grants and interviews with their district coordinators, describes how MSAP-funded magnet schools recruit and admit students. Schools report using a variety of strategies to recruit students, targeting those the schools believe are likely to exercise choice. These schools are most likely to give preference in admissions to siblings of students already enrolled in the magnet and students in nearby neighborhoods or schools.
1/27/2021
NCES 2015118 Documentation for the School Attendance Boundary Survey (SABS): School Year 2013-2014
The School Attendance Boundary Survey (SABS) data file contains school attendance boundaries for regular schools with grades kindergarten through twelfth in the 50 states and the District of Columbia for the 2013-2014 school year. Prior to this survey, a national fabric of attendance boundaries was not freely available to the public. The geography of school attendance boundaries provides new context for researchers who were previously limited to state and district level geography.
8/17/2015
REL 2015071 How Methodology Decisions Affect the Variability of Schools Identified as Beating the Odds
Schools that show better academic performance than would be expected given characteristics of the school and student populations are often described as "beating the odds" (BTO). State and local education agencies often attempt to identify such schools as a means of identifying strategies or practices that might be contributing to the schools' relative success. Key decisions on how to identify BTO schools may affect whether schools make the BTO list and thereby the identification of practices used to beat the odds. The purpose of this study was to examine how a list of BTO schools might change depending on the methodological choices and selection of indicators used in the BTO identification process. This study considered whether choices of methodologies and type of indicators affect the schools that are identified as BTO. The three indicators were (1) type of performance measure used to compare schools, (2) the types of school characteristics used as controls in selecting BTO schools, and (3) the school sample configuration used to pool schools across grade levels. The study applied statistical models involving the different methodologies and indicators and documented how the lists schools identified as BTO changed based on the models. Public school and student data from one midwest state from 2007-08 through 2010-11 academic years were used to generate BTO school lists. By performing pairwise comparisons among BTO school lists and computing agreement rates among models, the project team was able to gauge the variation in BTO identification results. Results indicate that even when similar specifications were applied across statistical methods, different sets of BTO schools were identified. In addition, for each statistical method used, the lists of BTO schools identified varied with the choice of indicators. Fewer than half of the schools were identified as BTO in more than one year. The results demonstrate that different technical decisions can lead to different identification results.
2/24/2015
REL 2012024 English Language Learner Enrollment in Appalachia Region States
This technical brief describes English language learner student enrollment across school districts in the four REL Appalachia Region states (Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia) for 2005/062008/09, updating an earlier report covering 1998/992004/05. The current brief expands on the earlier report by looking at data by grade span (kindergarten, 13, 46, 78, 912) and by geographic locale (city, suburb, town, rural).
3/29/2012
REL 2010015 Where Do English Language Learner Students Go to School? Student Distribution By Language Proficiency in Arizona
Research suggests several circumstances in which a school may face greater challenges in effectively teaching its English Language Learner (ELL) students and in closing the achievement gap between ELL students and those who are native English speakers: if it has high concentrations of ELL students; if it has many socioeconomically disadvantaged students; or if it is located in an urban or rural, as opposed to suburban, area. Research also suggests that an open-enrollment program in a district may increase the concentrations of both ELL and socioeconomically disadvantaged students in some schools. This technical brief analyzes Arizona's 2007/08 student-level data to determine how concentrations of ELL students vary across its schools and vary by the school characteristics listed above.
8/30/2010
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