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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2008035 Career and Technical Education in the United States: 1990–2005
This report is the fourth in a series of volumes published periodically by NCES to describe the condition of vocational education (now called “career and technical education” or CTE) in the United States. Based on data from 11 NCES surveys, the report describes CTE providers, offerings, participants, faculty, and associated outcomes, focusing on secondary, postsecondary, and adult education. Findings indicate that against a backdrop of increasing academic coursetaking in high school, no measurable changes were detected between 1990 and 2005 in the number of CTE credits earned by public high school graduates. At the postsecondary level, the number of credential-seeking undergraduates majoring in career fields increased by about one-half million students, although they made up a smaller portion of undergraduates in 2004 compared with 1990. At both the secondary and postsecondary education levels, student participation increased in health care and computer science and decreased in business between 1990 and the mid-2000s.
7/22/2008
NCES 2006309 The Postsecondary Educational Experiences of High School Career and Technical Education Concentrators: Selected Results From the NELS:88/2000 Postsecondary Education Transcript Study
This E.D. Tab presents information on the postsecondary educational experiences of students from the high school class of 1992 who concentrated in career and technical education (CTE) while in high school, including their postsecondary enrollment, coursetaking, and degree attainment patterns. The report also describes the extent to which high school CTE concentrators pursued the same field at the postsecondary level. Using data from students’ secondary transcripts collected as part of the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS:88/2000), analyses reveal that about 20 percent of 1992 high school seniors were CTE concentrators. Of those students, roughly one-quarter were dual concentrators, completing both a CTE and college preparatory curriculum. NELS:88/2000 also collected students’ postsecondary transcripts. These data show that by 2000, the majority of CTE concentrators from the class of 1992 had enrolled in postsecondary education. More than half of these students began their postsecondary education at a community college, while 37 percent began at a 4-year institution, and 7 percent at another type of institution. Of the high school CTE concentrators who enrolled in a postsecondary institution, 50 percent earned a postsecondary certificate or degree by 2000, while 26 percent earned a bachelor’s or higher degree. About half of CTE concentrators who enrolled in a postsecondary institution earned postsecondary credits in a related field and 27 percent earned 12 or more credits in a related field, roughly the equivalent of one semester of full-time postsecondary study. About 30 percent of high school CTE concentrators who earned a postsecondary degree or certificate did so in a related field.
7/20/2006
NCES 2005612 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 6 Issue 3
The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.
7/26/2005
NCES 2005113 Programs and Plans of the National Center for Education Statistics, 2005 Edition
This report summarizes NCES's current statistical programs, major publications, and plans for future work. The publication includes descriptions, timelines, and plans for all of the NCES data collections, such as the Common Core of Data, the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, and the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Also included are descriptions of NCES center-wide programs and services such as training, technology, and customer service.
5/24/2005
NCES 2005012 Trends in Undergraduate Career Education
This Issue Brief examines trends in undergraduate credentials (certificates, associate’s degrees, and bachelor’s degrees) in career-related areas of study. These trends are examined at both the subbaccalaureate and baccalaureate levels, from 1984-85 to 2000-01. The number of undergraduate credential awards increased over this period, in both academic and career areas, and at both the subbaccalaureate and baccalaureate levels. Although career education grew at a slower pace than academic education, it remained a majority proportion of undergraduate credentials in 2000-01. In addition, of the 11 career areas of study, 6 increased as a proportion of all credentials at the subbaccalaureate level, and 4 increased at the baccalaureate level. Career areas that declined as a proportion of all credential awards were largely concentrated in business/marketing and engineering/architectural sciences, at both levels of education.
3/17/2005
NCES 2005611 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 6 Issues 1&2
The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.
2/4/2005
NCES 2004609 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 5 Issue 3
The Quarterly offers an accessible, convenient overview of all NCES products released in a given period. Each issue includes: short publications (those less than 15 pages in length) in their entirety, executive summaries of longer publications, descriptive paragraphs of other NCES products, as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured publication with invited commentary pieces, a note on a current topic from a staff member, and a message from NCES.
4/22/2004
NCES 2004018 Undergraduate Enrollments in Academic, Career, and Vocational Education
This issue brief examines postsecondary vocational education within the context of all undergraduate education, using a new taxonomy that classifies undergraduate majors as academic majors or career majors. The taxonomy further divides career majors into subbaccalaureate and baccalaureate level majors. At the baccalaureate level, career majors are considered nonvocational and at the subbaccalaureate level they are considered vocational. Using the new taxonomy, most baccalaureate and sub-baccalaureate students in 1999-2000 were enrolled in career-oriented majors, as opposed to academic majors. Sub-baccalaureate students were more likely than baccalaureate students to enroll in career majors, with about 7 out of 10 sub-baccalaureate students having vocational career majors. These findings are based on data from degree-seeking undergraduates in the 1999-2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.
2/17/2004
NCES 2003038 Occupational Programs and the Use of Skill Competencies at the Secondary and Postsecondary Levels, 1999 (FRSS 72 and PEQIS 11): Public Use Data Files
Abstract: This file contains data from two 1999 quick-response surveys: "Vocational Programs in Secondary Schools" (FRSS 72) and "Occupational Programs in Postsecondary Education Institutions" (PEQIS 11). The surveys were conducted in response to national concern over the gap between existing workforce skills and expanding workplace demands. These data files include information on vocational and occupational programs at the secondary and postsecondary level, including the availability of programs in a large variety of occupational areas, procedures used to ensure courses teach relevant job skills, the prevalence of skill competency lists, the level of industry/educator partnership in developing skill competency lists, and the types of credentials available through the programs.
5/6/2003
NCES 2002120 Vocational Education Offerings in Rural High Schools
This report uses data from the 1999 Fast Response Survey System "Survey on Vocational Programs in Secondary Schools" to examine vocational education offerings in rural, suburban, and urban schools. The report finds that suburban and urban schools offered similar numbers and types of programs, while rural schools offered fewer programs. In particular, rural schools were less likely than schools in other areas to offer vocational education programs for occupations that were projected to be fast-growing. This difference in offerings may reflect differences in local labor markets.
8/19/2002
NCES 2002130 Digest of Education Statistics, 2001
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
3/1/2002
NCES 2001018 Features of Occupational Programs at the Secondary and Postsecondary Education Levels
This report provides national estimates on occupational program offerings, the use of skill competencies, and other occupational program characteristics in public secondary schools and less-than-4-year postsecondary institutions. Survey respondents reported on 28 selected occupational programs within 6 broad occupational areas at the secondary level and on 32 selected occupational programs in the same 6 occupational areas at the postsecondary level. Survey findings are presented by school type (comprehensive, vocational) and by level of institution (2-year, less-than-2-year). Most findings are based on schools and institutions that offered at least one of the listed occupational programs. Detailed information is provided regarding occupational programs’ use of skill competency lists, educator and industry involvement in the development of skill competency lists, criteria used to determine program completion, and the educational credentials offered by programs.
6/25/2001
NCES 2001072 The Condition of Education, 2001
The Condition of Education summarizes important developments and trends in education using the latest available data. The report, which is required by law, is an indicator report intended for a general audience of readers who are interested in education. The indicators represent a consensus of professional judgment on the most significant national measures of the condition and progress of education for which accurate data are available. The 2001 print edition includes 59 indicators in six main areas: (1) enrollment trends and student characteristics at all levels of the education system from preprimary education to adult learning; (2) student achievement and the longer term, enduring effects of education; (3) student effort and rates of progress through the educational system among different population groups; (4) the quality of elementary and secondary education in terms of courses taken, teacher characteristics, and other factors; (5) the context of postsecondary education; (6) and societal support for learning, including parental and community support for learning, and public and private financial support of education at all levels. Also in the 2001 edition is a special focus essay on the access, persistence, and success of first-generation students in postsecondary education.
5/31/2001
NCES 2001034 Digest of Education Statistics, 2000
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
1/26/2001
NCES 2001026 Changes in High School Vocational Coursetaking in a Larger Perspective
This Stats in Brief looks at trends in vocational coursetaking among high-school students, examining these trends in light of labor market changes. The report notes that the declines in concentrated vocational coursetaking from 1982 to 1998 were due primarily to declines in the "trade and industry" and "business" program areas. These vocational areas roughly correspond to occupations that have experienced below-average growth rates since the early 1980s. In addition, the four vocational program areas in which a larger proportion of students concentrated their coursetaking in 1998 than in 1982 prepare students for occupations that experienced above-average growth rates. These findings suggest that changes in vocational coursetaking may at least in part reflect responses to labor market trends.
10/30/2000
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