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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2016140 "Double-dosing" in math in North Carolina public schools
Double-dosing expands time for students to learn mathematics by having them participate in two (or occasionally more) mathematics classes during the regular school day in a given school year. Although the practice can take different forms and be used for different grade levels, most research on double-dosing has focused on students who need preparation to make the transition to Algebra I or similar rigorous high school mathematics classes—typically, grade 8 or grade 9 students. This study provides a more complete picture of the prevalence of double-dosing in mathematics in one state for the most recent year data were available: North Carolina in 2011/12. In addition to describing the prevalence of double-dosing in mathematics, the study reports the extent of its use for remediation, grade-level maintenance, and enrichment. The report also compares schools that offer double-dosing in mathematics with those that do not and examines the various characteristics of students enrolled in double-dosing.
8/3/2016
NCES 2011334 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): Public-Use Data File
This datafile contains the public-use data from the base year data collection of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09).

HSLS:09 is the fifth in a series of secondary school longitudinal studies sponsored by NCES. The design of HSLS:09 is similar to past studies, such as NELS:88 and ELS:2002, with data provided by students and their parents, math and science teachers, and school staff - both administrators and counselors. However, HSLS:09 emphasizes math and science as well as preparation for postsecondary education and features the following innovations: 1) HSLS:09 is the first NCES-sponsored longitudinal study to begin with a 9th grade cohort; 2) School counselor input into students’ decision-making about courses and postsecondary choices was collected; and 3) The mathematics assessment was developed specifically for this study and focuses on algebra skills critical to success in secondary and postsecondary education.
8/24/2011
NCES 2011328 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): Base-Year Data File Documentation
This documentation contains information necessary to understand and to analyze the base-year data of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09).
8/24/2011
NCES 2011333 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): Restricted-Use Data File
This datafile contains the restricted-use data from the base year data collection of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09).

HSLS:09 is the fifth in a series of secondary school longitudinal studies sponsored by NCES. The design of HSLS:09 is similar to past studies, such as NELS:88 and ELS:2002, with data provided by students and their parents, math and science teachers, and school staff - both administrators and counselors. However, HSLS:09 emphasizes math and science as well as preparation for postsecondary education and features the following innovations: 1) HSLS:09 is the first NCES-sponsored longitudinal study to begin with a 9th grade cohort; 2) School counselor input into students’ decision-making about courses and postsecondary choices was collected; and 3) The mathematics assessment was developed specifically for this study and focuses on algebra skills critical to success in secondary and postsecondary education.

The restricted-use datafile includes state representative data for ten states, school characteristics, and more detailed information than what is available in the public-use dataset.
8/24/2011
NCES 201001 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Base-Year Field Test Report
This report describes in detail the processes and results of the 2008 Field Test conducted to vet the operational procedures and instruments for the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009.
10/19/2010
REL 20094079 Accommodations for English Language Learner Students: The Effect of Linguistic Modification of Math Test Item Sets
REL West's study on middle school math assessment accommodations found that simplifying the language—or linguistic modification—on standardized math test items made it easier for English Language learners to focus on and grasp math concepts, and thus was a more accurate assessment of their math skills.

The results contribute to the body of knowledge informing assessment practices and accommodations appropriate for English language learner students.

The study examined students' performance on two sets of math items—both the originally worded items and those that had been modified. Researchers analyzed results from three subgroups of students—English learners (EL), non-English language arts proficient (NEP), and English language arts proficient (EP) students.

Key results include:
  • Linguistically modifying the language of mathematics test items did not change the math knowledge being assessed.
  • The effect of linguistic modification on students' math performance varied between the three student subgroups. The results also varied depending on how scores were calculated for each student.
  • For each of the four scoring approaches analyzed, the effect of linguistic modification was greatest for EL students, followed by NEP and EP students.
6/28/2010
NCES 2009002 Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998 - 99 (ECLS-K), Psychometric Report for the Eighth Grade
This methodological report documents the design, development, and psychometric characteristics of the assessment instruments used in the eighth grade data collection of the ECLS-K. The instruments examined include those developed to measure cognitive and socioemotional development. In addition, issues in analyzing longitudinal measures are discussed.
9/25/2009
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