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 Pub Number  Title  Date
REL 2019007 Math course sequences in grades 6–11 and math achievement in Mississippi
The purpose of this study was to examine how students in Mississippi met their mathematics requirements and the extent to which their mathematics sequence is related to student performance and demographic characteristics such as race and ethnicity. The study used data from the Mississippi Department of Education over a six-year period, beginning in 2011/12 and ending in 2016/17. The sample includes all students enrolled in grade 11 in Mississippi public high schools during the 2016/17 school year who had scores on the ACT Mathematics in grade 11 and recorded coursework in grade 6. Sequence analysis was used to summarize and then cluster the mathematics course-taking experience, or mathematics sequence, of these students in grades 6-11. Classification and regression tree analysis facilitated the identification of associations between mathematics sequence, student demographic characteristics, and college-ready performance on the ACT Mathematics in grade 11. Results indicate that membership in a particular mathematics sequence cluster did not improve the classification accuracy of the decision tree predicting risk status over and above the use of student achievement in grade 5 and student race. That these differences have less association with college-ready performance than student grade 5 mathematics achievement suggests a need to focus on prevention efforts before grade 6. Algebra I is often viewed as the gatekeeper course, but it is also possible that mathematics preparation at the elementary level sets a student on the path to taking Algebra I earlier in their mathematics sequence. While this study did not explore the quality of mathematics curriculum and instruction at the secondary level, the results of this study underscore the importance of mathematics instruction at the elementary level.
8/9/2019
NCES 2018118 Paths Through Mathematics and Science: Patterns and Relationships in High School Coursetaking
This report examines mathematics and science coursetaking in high school by providing a description of coursetaking within each of the mathematics and science subject areas in ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades, as well as by showing the association between early mathematics coursetaking and subsequent science coursetaking.

The report also describes coursetaking in engineering and technology, and the associations between coursetaking in these subject areas and in mathematics and science. The results are based on 2009 high school transcripts that are linked to 2009 NAEP mathematics and science 12th grade assessments.
6/19/2018
REL 2018276 Advanced course offerings and completion in science, technology, engineering, and math in Texas public high schools
The purpose of this study was to explore advanced STEM course offerings in Texas high schools and advanced STEM course taking among high school students to investigate variation in availability and enrollment for different school contexts and student groups. Using statewide longitudinal student records from 2007/08 to 2013/14 the research team examined patterns of course offerings using descriptive statistics from more than 1,500 public high schools in Texas, and student course completion patterns for close to one million students. Analyses revealed that access to advanced STEM courses in Texas has increased over this time period for schools in all locales, for schools with high and low proportions of economically disadvantaged students, and for schools with high proportions of minority students. High schools in urban and suburban areas and schools serving the highest proportions of Black and Hispanic students offered the greatest number of advanced STEM courses. In fact, a larger proportion of Hispanic and Black students in the state attended schools with the highest number of advanced STEM course offerings, compared to White students. However, despite this access to advanced STEM coursework, smaller proportions of Hispanic and Black students completed three or more advanced STEM courses than their White counterparts, even among a subgroup of high performing students based on math state standardized test scores in 8th grade. The findings from this study show that while Hispanic and Black students do lag White students in advanced STEM course completion, it is likely not because of lesser access to these courses. These findings point to a need for increasing Hispanic and Black student enrollment in those advanced courses and identifying mechanisms other than increasing course offerings to do so.
10/25/2017
NCES 2015038 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcripts Restricted-use Data File
These restricted-use files for the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) include data collected in the Base Year (2009), First Follow-up (2012), 2013 Update and High School Transcripts (2014). This release includes both composite variables as well as variables from questionnaires and high school transcripts that were suppressed on the public-use version of the data files.
7/1/2015
NCES 2015037REV High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) 2013 Update and High School Transcript Study: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2013
This report provides a first look at selected findings from 1) the 2013 Update and 2) the High School Transcript Study of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09). HSLS:09 is a nationally representative study of a cohort of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009. The study focuses on understanding students’ trajectories from the beginning of high school into higher education and the workforce. The core research questions for the study explore secondary to postsecondary transition plans and the evolution of those plans; the paths into and out of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields of study and careers; and the educational and social experiences related to these shifts in plans or paths.
6/25/2015
NCES 2012046 Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study
The Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study is a congressionally-mandated statistical report that documents the scope and nature of gaps in access and persistence in higher education by sex and race/ethnicity. The report presents 46 indicators grouped under seven main topic areas: (1) demographic context; (2) characteristics of schools; (3) student behaviors and afterschool activities; (4) academic preparation and achievement; (5) college knowledge; (6) postsecondary education; and (7) postsecondary outcomes and employment. In addition, the report contains descriptive multivariate analyses of variables that are associated with male and female postsecondary attendance and attainment.
8/28/2012
NCES 2012243 2004/2009 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study Restricted-Use Transcript Data Files and Documentation
The Postsecondary Education Transcript Study restricted-use data file contains transcript data from study members in the 2004/09 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09). BPS:04/09 includes a nationally representative sample of students who began postsecondary education for the first time in the 2003-04 academic year. Transcripts were collected on sample members from every institution attended between the 2003-04 academic year and the 2008-09 academic year. Data from student interviews and administrative sources are available in a separate restricted use file.
3/7/2012
NCES 2012162REV 2010 College Course Map
The College Course Map (CCM) is a taxonomy system for coding postsecondary education courses in NCES research studies. This publication describes how the newest version of the College Course Map was updated and provides a listing of all the course codes used for the postsecondary education transcript studies conducted in 2009 (PETS:09) .
1/19/2012
NCES 2011355 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders' Parents, Teachers, School Counselors, and School Administrators
This report features initial findings from the base year of a new longitudinal study that started with a nationally representative cohort of ninth-graders in the fall of 2009. This report focuses on the contextual data provided by students' parents and school staff.

The analyses examine parents' educational expectations for their ninth-graders as well as savings for postsecondary education; teachers' preparation and experience; and school administrators’ challenges in managing students’ schools across students' socioeconomic and academic backgrounds.
9/13/2011
NCES 2011327 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): A First Look at Fall 2009 9th-Graders
On June 28, the National Center for Education Statistics will release High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09): A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders.

This report features initial findings from the base year of a new longitudinal study that started with a nationally representative cohort of ninth-graders in the fall of 2009 and will follow these students through postsecondary education and the world of work. The base year data focus on students’ transitions into high school, especially their decisions about courses and plans for postsecondary education and careers. The HSLS:09 study captures these decisions, plans, expectations, and activities generally but also specifically in math and science.
6/28/2011
NCES 2010015 Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups
This report profiles current conditions and recent trends in the education of students by racial and ethnic group. It presents a selection of indicators that illustrate the educational achievement and attainment of White, Black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander students. This report presents 29 indicators that provide information and examine (1) demographics, (2) patterns of preprimary, elementary, and secondary school enrollment; (3) student achievement, (4)persistence; (5) student behaviors that can affect their education; (6) participation in postsecondary education; and (7) outcomes of education.

7/14/2010
NCES 2008320 Trends Among High School Seniors, 1972-2004
Using questionnaire and transcript data collected in 1972, 1980, 1982, 1992, and 2004, this report presents information on five cohorts of high school seniors. The analysis addresses overall trends, as well as trends within various subgroups defined by sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). Key findings of the report include the following: The proportion of Black seniors who were in the highest SES quartile doubled from 1972 to 1992 (from 5 percent to 10 percent), and increased overall from 5 percent in 1972 to 14 percent in 2004. The percentage of seniors enrolling in calculus during their senior year grew from 6 percent to 13 percent between 1982 and 2004. The percentage of seniors taking no mathematics courses during their senior year declined from 57 percent to 34 percent over this time period. Seniors increased their senior-year enrollment in advanced science courses (chemistry II, physics II, and advanced biology) from 12 percent in 1982 to 25 percent in 2004. In each class of seniors, most of those who planned further schooling intended to attend four-year postsecondary schools, with the proportion of students planning to attend four-year schools rising from 34 percent in 1972 to 61 percent in 2004. In all years, higher percentages of Asian high school seniors, and lower percentages of Hispanic seniors (except in 1992), compared to other racial/ethnic groups, planned attendance at four-year institutions No difference was observed between 1972 and 2004 between the percentage of seniors expecting a bachelor’s degree as their highest level of education. Instead, growth between these two time points was greatest in expectations for a graduate or professional degree: 13 percent of seniors expected to attain this level of education as their highest in 1972, compared to 38 percent of seniors in 2004. In 1972, males expected to earn a graduate degree as their highest educational level in greater proportions than did females (16 percent versus 9 percent); however, in 2004, females expected to earn a graduate degree more often than males (45 percent versus 32 percent). Seniors increasingly expected to work in professional occupations (growing from 45 percent of seniors in 1972 to 63 percent of seniors in 2004 expecting to work in a professional field).
6/24/2008
NCES 2008346 Education Longitudinal Study of 2002/06: Restricted Use Second Follow-up Data Files, Data File Documentation, and Electronic Codebook System
This ELS:2002/2004 CDROM contains a revised version of the restricted-use base-year to second follow-up data that were previously released. Manuals documenting the sample design of these data, how they were collected, and how they should be used are included. This documentation is public use and can be downloaded directly from the ELS website (http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/els2002 /manuals.asp).

The ELS:2002 longitudinal study is designed to monitor a national sample of young people as they progress from tenth grade through high school and on to postsecondary education and/or the world of work. By the third follow-up in 2012, these young people will be in their mid-twenties.

Users of the original second follow-up restricted-use data (NCES 2008-346) can obtain this revised version (NCES 2008-346r) by requesting it from the IES Data Security Office (IESData.Security@ed.gov). Nearly all of the changes that have been made in the original data are in base year and first follow-up variables and not transcript or second follow-up variables.

However, none of these changes affect data that were originally released in the base year to first follow-up restricted-use data (NCES 2006-430 ), or the transcript restricted-use data (NCES-2006-351).
10/16/2007
NCES 2007039 Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Minorities
This report profiles current conditions and recent trends in the education of minority students. It presents a selection of indicators that illustrate the educational achievement and attainment of Hispanic, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander students compared with each other and with White students. In addition, it uses data from the 2005 American Community Survey to detail specific educational differences among Hispanic ancestry subgroups (such as Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban) and Asian ancestry subgroups (such as Asian Indian, Chinese, or Filipino). This report presents 28 indicators that provide demographic information and examine (1) patterns of preprimary, elementary, and secondary school enrollment; (2) student achievement and persistence; (3) student behaviors that can affect their education; (4) participation in postsecondary education; and (5) outcomes of education.
9/12/2007
NCES 2007312 Advanced Mathematics and Science Coursetaking in the Spring High School Senior Classes of 1982, 1992, and 2004
This report presents new time series data on the coursetaking patterns in mathematics and science for the spring high school graduating classes of 1982, 1992, and 2004. Coursetaking information was derived from high school transcripts collected by NCES in the following three studies: (1) High School and Beyond Longitudinal Study of 1980 Sophomores; (2) the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988; and (3) the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002. The analysis addresses overall trends, as well as trends within various subgroups defined by sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), expectations for future educational attainment, and school sector. The report examines trends in academic coursetaking in both mean credits earned in math and science and in the highest course level that high school graduates completed in the two subjects. Some key findings are as follows. First, in mathematics, academic coursework increased from, on average, 2.7 total credits in 1982 to 3.6 total credits in 2004. In addition, graduates shifted from taking lower level mathematics courses to taking more advanced courses. For example, the percentage of graduates who persisted through the mathematics curriculum into the two most advanced levels—precalculus and calculus—tripled between 1982 and 2004. At the subgroup level, while students in each of the four SES quartiles increased their participation in advanced mathematics over time, some disparities increased—for example, the difference between the highest and lowest SES quartiles in precalculus and calculus coursetaking went from 18 percentage points in 1982 to 35 percentage points in 2004. Second, in science, the average number of credits increased from 2.2 total credits in 1982 to 3.3 total credits in 2004. Further, graduates shifted in significant proportions from taking lower level science courses to taking upper level ones. At the subgroup level, despite increased completion of advanced-level science courses by graduates from all school sectors, Catholic and other private school students remained more likely than their public school counterparts to complete advanced-level courses in science.
8/9/2007
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