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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2007017 Digest of Education Statistics, 2006
The 42nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
7/26/2007
NCES 2005150 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study 1993/2003 Data Analysis System (DAS) On-line
The DAS contains data from the 2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:1993/2003). This study is the third follow-up of a national sample of students who completed bachelor degrees in academic year 1992-1993 and were first surveyed as part of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study. This DAS allows users to conduct analyses on data gathered in this study while on-line via the web.
9/20/2006
NCES 2006030 Digest of Education Statistics, 2005
The 41st in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest’s primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons. Some examples of highlights from the report include the following items. Enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools rose 22 percent between 1985 and 2005. The fastest public school growth occurred in the elementary grades (prekindergarten through grade 8), where enrollment rose 24 percent over this period, from 27.0 million to 33.5 million. Public secondary school enrollment declined 8 percent from 1985 to 1990, but then rose 31 percent from 1990 to 2005, for a net increase of 20 percent. The number of public school teachers has risen faster than the number of students over the past 10 years, resulting in declines in the pupil/teacher ratio. Between 1994 and 2004, the number of full-time college students increased by 30 percent compared to an 8 percent increase in part-time students. During the same time period, the number of men enrolled rose 16 percent, while the number of women enrolled increased by 25 percent.
8/10/2006
NCES 2006078 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2001-05 Electronic Codebook and Public-Use Data Files
Three surveys were fielded in 2005 as part of the National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES). These were the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP), the After-School Programs and Activities (ASPA), and the Adult Education (AE) surveys. Three surveys were also fielded in 2001 as part of NHES. These were earlier versions of the 2005 collections and include the Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Survey (AELL), the Before- and After-School Programs and Activities Survey (ASPA) and the Early Childhood Program Participation Survey (ECPP). The 2003 collections were the Parent and Family Involvement (PFI) and the Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons (AEWR) surveys. The data, data documentation, and software to help search through and convert the data from these surveys into SPSS, SAS, or STATA files are available on CD, and the data files and documentation can also be downloaded directly from this website.
6/7/2006
NCEE 20053002 Third National Even Start Evaluation: Follow-Up Findings From the Experimental Design Study
The third national Even Start evaluation included two complementary studies: (1) the Even Start Performance Information Reporting System (ESPIRS) provided annual data on the universe of Even Start projects from 1997–1998 through 2000–2001, and (2) the Experimental Design Study (EDS) was an experimental study of Even Start's effectiveness in 18 projects, reflecting the way that projects were implemented during 1999–2000 and 2000–2001.

The major set of evaluation findings are contained in the recently-released report by St.Pierre, Ricciuti, Tao, Creps, Swartz, Lee, Parsad & Rimdzius (2003). The analysis for that report relied on a comparison of pretest data collected at the beginning of the school year with posttest data collected at the end of the same school year from Even Start and control group families who participated in the EDS. The present document updates the findings from the St.Pierre, Ricciuti, Tao, et al (2003) report by comparing pretest data with follow-up data collected about nine months after the posttest. The findings presented in this document are consistent with and lead to the same conclusions as findings contained in the earlier report.
6/1/2006
NCES 2006077 Adult Education Participation in 2004-05
This descriptive report presents selected data on adults’ participation in adult educational activities in the United States, excluding full-time college/university or vocational/technical credential programs, over a 12-month period from 2004-05. These data are from the Adult Education Survey of the 2005 National Household Education Surveys Program. Interviews for the survey were conducted with a nationally representative sample adults. A wide range of statistics is included in the report. For example, 44 percent of adults reported having participated in formal adult educational activities (excluding full-time college programs) in this time period.
5/31/2006
NCES 2006614 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 7 Issues 1&2
The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.
1/17/2006
NCES 2006166 1993/03 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/03) Methodology Report
This report describes the procedures and results of the full-scale implementation of the B&B:93/03 study. Students who earned a bachelor's degree in 1992-93 were first interviewed in 1993 and then subsequently in 1994 and 1997. This is the final follow-up interview of the B&B:93 cohort, 10 years following completion of the bachelor's degree. The results of this study offer an opportunity to assess the value of a baccalaureate degree at a time when sample members are becoming established in their careers. Specific topics of interest include length of time to complete a baccalaureate degree, the pursuit of additional postsecondary education beyond a bachelor's degree, and employment outcomes.
1/9/2006
NCES 2006470 A First Look at the Literacy of America’s Adults in the 21st Century
The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) measures the English literacy of America's adults (people age 16 and older living in households and prisons). NAAL builds on the previous national assessment of literacy completed in 1992. The 2003 assessment defines literacy as “using printed and written information to function in society, to achieve one’s goals, and to develop one’s knowledge and potential.” Results are reported in terms of scale score averages and literacy levels on three literacy scales: prose, document, and quantitative. The literacy levels were described as below basic, basic, intermediate, and proficient. Each level corresponded to a specific range of scale scores and was described in terms of the abilities associated with each level and the types of tasks that adults could complete at that level. An additional component comprising 5 percent of the adult population was the non-literate in English. The non-literate in English included the 2 percent who could not be tested because they could not communicate in English or Spanish, and the 3 percent who took an alternative assessment because they were unable to complete a minimum number of simple literacy screening questions. Results showed that the average quantitative literacy scores of adults increased 8 points between 1992 and 2003, though average prose and document literacy did not differ significantly from 1992. Among Blacks, average prose literacy scores increased by 6 points and average document literacy scores rose by 8 points between 1992 and 2003 (figure 1). The average prose scores of Asians/Pacific Islanders increased as well, rising 16 points between 1992 and 2003.The average prose literacy scores of Hispanics fell 18 points from 1992 to 2003, while average document literacy scores decreased by 14 points. Average prose and document literacy scores among Whites did not change significantly.
12/15/2005
NCES 2006471 Key Concepts and Features of the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy
The 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) is the first assessment of the nation’s progress in adult literacy since the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS). The 2003 NAAL is a complex assessment with several components and various types of data. The primary purpose of this publication is to describe this assessment’s key features and data types. The publication reviews key elements carried over from the 1992 assessment, including a “functional” view of adult literacy and three distinct literacy areas (prose, document, and quantitative). It also introduces critical new aspects of the 2003 assessment, including new performance levels that are used to report results and new components that provide expanded data about the least-literate adults and the role of basic skills in adult literacy performance.
12/15/2005
NCES 2006613 Education Statistics Quarterly-Vol. 6 Issue 4
The Quarterly offers a comprehensive overview of work done across all of NCES. Each issue includes short publications and summaries covering all NCES publications and data products released in a given time period as well as notices about training and funding opportunities. In addition, each issue includes a featured topic with invited commentary, and a note on the topic from NCES.
11/28/2005
NCES 2006040 Participation in Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons: 2002-03
The report summarizes data collected through the Adult Education for Work-Related Reasons survey fielded in 2003 as part of the National Household Education Surveys. The survey asked a random sample of adults about their work-related educational activities and experiences over the previous 12-months. The survey defined work-related activities in terms of formal and informal learning activities that are done for reasons related to work. Findings from the survey reveal that 40 percent of adults in the nation participated in some type of formal adult education for work-related reasons during a 12-month period in 2002-03. Thirty-three percent participated in work-related courses, 9 percent were in a college degree program, 2 percent were in a vocational degree/diploma program, and 1 percent had an apprenticeship. Fifty-eight percent of adults participated in informal work-related learning activities.
11/10/2005
NCES 2005151 Independent Undergraduates: 1999-2000
This report provides a comprehensive look at independent students who were enrolled in postsecondary education in the United States and Puerto Rico in 1999–2000. Independent students are assumed to be financially self-sufficient and no longer dependent upon their parents to support them or finance their education. Many independent students work full time and attend community colleges or other postsecondary institutions that are geared toward career training in specialized fields such as health, technology, and business. Working, as many hours as they do, independent students are more likely to enroll in postsecondary institutions part time. They are less likely than dependent students to apply for financial aid, and are less likely to apply for it on time, or before the typical May 1 deadline for state and institutional aid. Among those who do apply for aid, independent students are less likely than dependent students to receive state and institutional grants, more likely to receive Pell Grants and, although they are less likely to take out student loans, the average amount they borrow is larger. Being married or having children are characteristics common to independent students, and while being married can raise one’s income, having children can increase one’s living expenses considerably.
10/21/2005
NCES 2006005 Digest of Education Statistics, 2004
The Digest of Education Statistics provides a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. Topics in the Digest include: the number of schools and colleges; teachers; enrollments; graduates; educational attainment; finances; federal funds for education; employment and income of graduates; libraries; technology; and international comparisons.
10/12/2005
NCES 2005048 Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01
This report uses the Adult Education Survey of the 2001 National Household Education Survey Program to examine the extent and nature of participation in work-related education among adults in the labor force. The report provides data on instructional providers, topics studied, employer support, and other employment-related inducements for participation.
9/27/2005
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