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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2007175 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Institution Data Analysis System
The NSOPF:04 Institution DAS contains data on 920 institutions that responded to a nationally representative sample of all public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions that offered an associate's or higher degree in the U.S. in fall 2003 and participated in federal Title IV student aid programs. Data contained on the NSOPF:04 Institution DAS were collected in 2004 and focus on institutional policies and practices such as recent tenure-related changes and actions, methods used to evaluate teaching performance, and benefits available to full- and part-time faculty and instructional staff by type of institution.
4/24/2007
NCES 2007157 Institutional Policies and Practices Regarding Postsecondary Faculty: Fall 2003
This report describes recent hiring and retirement patterns as well as tenure-related changes and actions taken by public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions that offered an associate’s or higher degree in fall 2003 and participated in federal Title IV student aid programs. The 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) sampled such institutions in the 50 states and the District of Columbia both to obtain lists of faculty and instructional staff to be surveyed and also to collect data on the institution’s policies and environment for such staff. About 920 institutions completed the survey, resulting in a weighted response rate of 84 percent. In fall 2003, some 8 percent of all full-time faculty were hired the previous year from outside the institution, while 7 percent had left their institutions during the previous year. Of those who left, 36 percent retired. At least 90 percent of all doctoral or master’s institutions had tenure systems, but even among public associate’s institutions, the majority (64 percent) had a tenure system. About 64 percent of institutions with a tenure system limit time on tenure track to 6 or 7 years. One-half (52 percent) of institutions with a tenure system offered early or phased retirement to tenured faculty members between 1998 and 2003.
11/7/2006
NCES 2006183 Restricted-Use Data File: 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04)
Included on this CD-ROM are data files from approximately 920 institutions and 26,100 faculty and instructional staff included in the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04). Also included are electronic codebook systems for using these data files. Your organization must apply for and be granted a restricted data license in order to obtain these data.
5/9/2006
NCES 2006176 Background Characteristics, Work Activities, and Compensation of Instructional Faculty and Staff: Fall 2003
This publication is the second from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04), a study of faculty and instructional staff in public and private not-for-profit 2-year-and-above postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the background characteristics, work activities, and compensation of instructional faculty and staff in fall 2003, by employment status, institution type, and program area. The results show that the majority (57 percent) of instructional faculty and staff were employed full time in fall 2003. Women made up a larger proportion of part-time than full-time instructional faculty and staff (47 percent vs. 38 percent). Full-time instructional faculty and staff, overall, reported working an average of 53 hours each week at all jobs both within and outside the institution, and part-time faculty averaged 40 hours per week at all jobs. The average basic salary from the institution for full-time instructional faculty and staff in all types of institutions was $66,800, and the average basic salary for part-time instructional staff was $11,000 in 2003.
12/21/2005
NCES 2005172 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Report on Faculty and Instructional Staff in Fall 2003
This publication is the first from the 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04), a study of faculty and instructional staff employed in degree-granting public and private not-for-profit postsecondary institutions in the United States. This report describes the gender, race/ethnicity, tenure status, and income of all faculty and instructional staff, by employment status, institution type, and program area.
5/26/2005
NCES 2005162 2004 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:04) Data Analysis System
The NSOPF:04 DAS contains data on 26,110 faculty and instructional staff that responded to a nationally representative sample of all full- and part-time faculty and instructional staff employed at public and private not-for-profit degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the fall of 2003. Data contained on the DAS were collected in 2004 and focus on the background characteristics, work activities, compensation, and future plans of faculty and instructional staff.
5/15/2005
NCES 200208 A Profile of Part-Time Faculty: Fall 1998
This report describes some of the key findings from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99) concerning the similarities and differences between part-time and full-time faculty.
10/2/2002
NCES 2002011 Condition of Education 2002 in Brief
This publication, the Condition of Education 2002 in Brief, contains a sample of 22 of the 44 indicators in The Condition of Education 2002. The topics covered include enrollments in preschool, elementary/secondary, and postsecondary education; student achievement; high school dropout, college transition, and college persistence rates; trends in high school coursetaking, school choice, and the qualifications of teachers; the impacts of work on college students, distance education, and faculty salaries; and, levels of education funding.
9/10/2002
NCES 2002170 Gender and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Salary and Other Characteristics of Postsecondary Faculty: Fall 1998
This report describes gender and racial/ethnic differences in salaries and other characteristics of full-time instructional faculty and staff in fall 1998 using NSOPF:99 data. Differences between men and women and among four racial/ethnic groups--White non-Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, Black non-Hispanic, and Hispanic faculty--are examined with respect to the institutions and appointments, education and experience, and teaching and research activities of these faculty. In addition, a regression analysis examines whether salary differences by gender and race/ethnicity persist when controlling for all of these types of factors.
9/10/2002
NCES 2002209 Teaching Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Institutions: Fall 1998
Using the 1998–99 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99), this report examines the extent to which instructional faculty and staff in postsecondary institutions were involved in undergraduate teaching in fall 1998. Specifically, this report examines who, among postsecondary instructional faculty and staff, were more likely to teach undergraduates. It also explores the teaching loads of those who taught undergraduate classes for credit and the teaching practices that they used for their undergraduate teaching.
8/20/2002
NCES 2002160 The Gender and Racial/Ethnic Composition of Postsecondary Instructional Faculty and Staff, 1992–98
Using data from the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93 and NSOPF:99), this E.D. Tab describes how the gender and racial/ethnic composition of full- and part-time instructional faculty and staff has changed between the fall of 1992 and 1998. The report discusses changes in the gender and racial/ethnic composition of instructional faculty and staff by level, type and control of institution, and academic program area.
8/1/2002
NCES 2002210 Tenure Status of Postsecondary Instructional Faculty and Staff: 1992—98
Using data from the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:93 and NSOPF:99), this report examines changes in the tenure status of full-time instructional faculty and staff at 2- and 4-year institutions between the fall of 1992 and 1998. It explores changes in tenure status by institutional level and control, program area, and the faculty’s academic rank, gender, and race/ethnicity.
7/16/2002
NCES 2002161 Teaching With Technology: Use of Telecommunications Technology by Postsecondary Instructional Faculty and Staff in Fall 1998
This report uses data from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99) to examine postsecondary instructional faculty and staff’s access to and use of electronic mail (e-mail) and the Internet. Though these telecommunications technologies are rapidly becoming core components of the instructional experience of students in the U.S., little descriptive information exists at the national level to inform basic questions about technology use and teaching in postsecondary education. Specifically, this report provides answers to the following questions: Who has access to telecommunications technology, such as electronic mail and the Internet? Who uses it for teaching purposes and how much do they use it?
6/13/2002
NCES 2002163 Part-time Instructional Faculty and Staff: Who They Are, What They Do, and What They Think
This report describes the characteristics and attitudes of part-time instructional faculty and staff in fall 1992. It includes a compendium of tables on the characteristics, work activities, attitudes, and compensation of part-time and full-time instructional faculty and staff in public and private not-for-profit 2-year-and-above postsecondary institutions. It offers researchers and policymakers a resource for making comparisons with future NSOPF reports on part-time faculty.
2/28/2002
NCES 2002155 Distance Education Instruction by Postsecondary Faculty and Staff: Fall 1998
Using the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, this report examines who, among postsecondary faculty and staff, were more likely to teach various types of distance education classes. It also explores how those who taught such classes differed from those who did not in terms of workload, compensation, interaction with students, classroom practices, and job satisfaction. Overall, those who taught distance classes had a higher workload than those who did not. They were also more likely to communicate with their students by e-mail and to use Web sites for their classes.
2/11/2002
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