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National Center for Special Education Research


The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 6 Years After High School: Key Findings From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2)

The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults With Disabilities up to 6 Years After High School: Key Findings From the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 is a report that uses data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 dataset to provide a national picture of post-high school outcomes for students with disabilities. The report includes postsecondary enrollment rates; employment rates; engagement in employment, education, and/or job training activities; household circumstances (e.g., residential independence, parenting status); and social and community involvement.

Selected findings include:

  • Fifty-five percent of young adults with disabilities reported having continued on to postsecondary school since leaving high school. They were less likely to enroll in postsecondary school, however, than were their same-age peers in the general population, of whom 62 percent ever had attended postsecondary school.
  • Seventy-one percent of students with disabilities were reported to have a paid job at the time of the interview other than work around the house. They were as likely to have a paid job at the time of the interview as were their same age peers in the general population, of whom 71 percent reported currently having a paid job.
  • Eighty-five percent of students with disabilities were reported to be productively engaged in the community either through being engaged in employment, postsecondary education, or job training since leaving high school. They were less likely to engage in these activities than were their same-age peers in the general population, of whom 95 percent reported being engaged in employment, postsecondary education, or job training since leaving high school.
  • Thirty-six percent of young adults with disabilities were reported to be living independently at the time of the interview. Young adults were considered to be living independently if they were living alone or with a spouse, partner, or roommate. Young adults with disabilities were less likely to be living independently than were their same-age peers in the general population, of whom 44 percent were reported to be living independently at the time of the interview.
  • At the time of the interview, 60 percent of young adults with disabilities had a checking account, and 45 percent had a credit card in his or her name. They were less likely to have a checking account or credit card than were their same-age peers in the general population, of whom 71 percent and 55 percent, respectively, reported to have achieved this level of financial independence.

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