WWC review of this study

The impact of dual enrollment on college degree attainment: Do low-SES students benefit?

An, B. P. (2013). Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 35, 57–75. doi: 10.3102/0162373712461933 Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1009522

  • Quasi-Experimental Design
     examining 
    8,800
     Students
    , grades
    9-12
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations

Reviewed: February 2017

Attainment outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Any college degree (%)

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

12 Years

High school students;
8,800 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
6
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Any college degree (%)

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

12 Years

High school students with parent education= some college;
2,810 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
7

Any college degree (%)

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

12 Years

High school students with parent education= HS or less;
1,850 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
6

Any college degree (%)

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

12 Years

High school students with parent education= post bachelor’s degree;
670 students

N/A

N/A

No

--

Any college degree (%)

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

12 Years

High school students with parent education= bachelor’s degree;
960 students

N/A

N/A

No

--
Study sample characteristics were not reported.
  • Race
    Not specified
    100%

Setting

Students in the dual enrollment and comparison conditions were participants in the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS), which began in 1988 with a nationally representative sample of eighth-grade students attending school in the United States.

Study sample

The intervention group contained 880 students who had participated in dual enrollment during high school. The comparison group contained 7,920 students who had not participated in dual enrollment during high school. These students came from many schools across the United States. No sample characteristics were provided in the study.

Intervention Group

The intervention group was comprised of those individuals in the NELS sample who attended college and participated in dual enrollment programs in high school. No other information about the nature or characteristics of the dual enrollment programs was provided.

Comparison Group

The comparison group was comprised of NELS participants who attended college but did not participate in a dual enrollment program in high school. The comparison students participated in other high school programs (e.g., traditional high school programs or Advanced Placement programs).

Support for implementation

No information about training or implementation was provided in the study report.

At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards with reservations

Reviewed: December 2013

Attainment outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
index

Any college degree attainment

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

Posttest

High school students;
8,800 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
6
More Outcomes

Bachelor's degree attainment

Dual Enrollment Programs vs. Business as usual

Posttest

High school students;
8,800 students

N/A

N/A

Yes

 
 
5

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 54%
    Male: 46%
  • Race
    Asian
    9%
    Black
    9%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    12%
    Not Hispanic
    88%
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    Midwest, Northeast, South, West
 

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