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 Pub Number  Title  Date
NCES 2017094 Digest of Education Statistics, 2016
The 52nd in a series of publications initiated in 1962, the Digest's purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of education from prekindergarten through graduate school. The Digest contains data on a variety of topics, including the number of schools and colleges, teachers, enrollments, and graduates, in addition to educational attainment, finances, and federal funds for education, libraries, and international comparisons.
2/20/2018
REL 2018284 Teacher certification and academic growth among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District
This study assesses whether a teacher’s certification type (that is, being a certified bilingual teacher or a certified English as a second language [ESL] teacher) and route to certification—alternative, postbaccalaureate, traditional, or additional exam—correlate with academic growth and growth in English proficiency among English learner students in the Houston Independent School District (HISD). The student sample consisted of HISD students in grades 4 or 5 during the 2005/06–2014/15 school years who were classified as English learner students, participated in HISD's bilingual or ESL program in grades 4 or 5, and had Spanish as their home language. Data from the four most recent cohorts (2011/12–2014/15) were used for the analyses of mathematics and reading outcomes using the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) assessment program. All cohorts were used for the analyses of the English proficiency outcomes using the Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System assessment. The corresponding teacher sample consisted of HISD teachers who taught mathematics or reading to the student sample described. The study used student achievement models, sometimes called value-added specifications, to examine whether specific teacher certification types and routes were associated with larger achievement gains.

For math, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 but lower growth in achievement in grade 5 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 math. For reading, having a teacher with bilingual certification was associated with higher student growth in achievement in grade 4 compared with having a teacher without bilingual or English as a second language certification. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the traditional route was associated with the highest growth in achievement in grade 4 reading. For English proficiency, having a teacher with bilingual certification through the postbaccalaureate route was associated with the highest student growth in grade 4. Having a teacher with bilingual certification through the alternative route was associated with the highest growth in English proficiency in grade 5.

Given the inconsistent results, there are no clear implications for practice. Additional research might investigate alternate methods for identifying which teachers are effective.
2/13/2018
NCES 2018100 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 Data File User's Manual
The 2016 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2016) Data File User’s Manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the NHES:2016 data files, which include data from the Early Childhood Program Participation survey, the Parent and Family Involvement in Education survey, and the Adult Training and Education Survey. The survey program collected information about early childhood care, parental involvement in education, school choice, homeschooling, certifications and non-degree credentials, and adult training. Data files are being released for each of the three surveys and are being released with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, and R formats available.
2/9/2018
NCES 2018104 National Household Education Survey Programs of 2016 Public-Use Data Files
Three surveys were fielded in 2016 as part of the National Household Education Surveys Program: the Early Childhood Program Participation survey (ECPP), the Parent and Family Involvement in Education survey (PFI), and the Adult Training and Education Survey (ATES). Data files and documentation can be downloaded directly from the website. Data files are being released for each of the three surveys and are being released with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, and R formats available.
2/9/2018
NCES 2018105 National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 Restricted-Use Data Files
The National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES): 2016 restricted-use files include the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) file, the Parent and Family Involvement in Education (PFI) file, and the Adult Training and Education Survey (ATES) file. Data files are being released for each of the three surveys and are being released with ASCII, SAS, SPSS, Stata, and R formats available.
2/9/2018
NCES 2018421 First-Generation Students: College Access, Persistence, and Postbachelor’s Outcomes
This Statistics in Brief focuses on students whose parents have not attended college and examines these students’ high school success and postsecondary enrollment, persistence and degree completion once they enrolled in college, and graduate school enrollment and employment outcomes after they attained a bachelor’s degree. Their outcomes are compared to those of their peers whose parents had attended or completed college. This report draws on data from three nationally representative studies from the National Center for Education Statistics: the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002), the 2004/09 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/09), and the 2008/12 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:08/12).
2/8/2018
NCEE 20184007 Preparing for Life after High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 3: Comparisons Over Time
The third report volume from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012 (NLTS 2012) presents information on the changes over time in the characteristics and high school experiences of secondary students participating in special education. NLTS 2012 is part of the congressionally-mandated National Assessment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004 (IDEA 2004) and is the third longitudinal study conducted by the U.S. Department of Education over several decades focused on youth with an individualized education program (IEP) supported by IDEA. This third volume compares survey data in 1987, 2003, and 2012 from the three NLTS, focusing on 15- to 18-year olds with an IEP overall and in 12 federal disability groups. Where comparable data are available, the volume also examines trends for 19- to 21-year olds who are still enrolled in high school.

Findings from the third volume suggest that, over the past decade (2003-2012), youth with an IEP have become more engaged in school and increased their use of school supports. At the same time, youth with an IEP are less likely than in the past to take some key steps to prepare for their transition to adult life. Among students with an IEP, youth with emotional disturbance and youth with intellectual disability experienced more positive changes over the past decade than youth in other disability groups.
2/7/2018
REL 2018289 Trends in Algebra II completion and failure rates for students entering Texas public high schools
The purpose of this study was to examine Algebra II completion and failure rates in Texas for high school students in the grade 9 cohorts of 2007/08 through 2014/15. This period spans (1) the point at which Texas began implementing the 4x4 curriculum that required four courses each in English, math (including Algebra II), science, and social studies and (2) when the state moved to the new Foundation High School Program—which eliminates Algebra II as a math requirement—with the 2014/15 cohort. Using longitudinal student- and district-level administrative data from the Texas Education Agency and district-level responses to a statewide online survey administered during spring 2015, the research team examined Algebra II completion and failure rates, and determined how districts were communicating with parents about the new graduation requirements and whether they would be offering the new Algebra II replacement courses during the first year of implementation. Results indicate that approximately 37 percent of districts reported requiring students to complete Algebra II to graduate from high school. Fewer than half of districts reported that they planned to offer the alternative math courses in the first year of implementing the new graduation requirements. Overall, Algebra II completion and failure rates for the 2014/15 cohort followed the same trend as seen for the seven cohorts graduating under the previous graduation requirements. This study suggests that the third high school math course students took was not immediately influenced by the new graduation requirements. Future research could continue to track additional cohorts of students to determine if student change their course-taking in response to additional changes districts may make in implementing the new graduation requirements or if the increased flexibility in course selection is related to other student outcomes such as dropout rates.
2/6/2018
NFES 2017168 Forum Guide to Reporting Civil Rights Data
The Forum Guide to Reporting Civil Rights Data presents a variety of effective methods through which local education agencies (LEAs) report civil rights data to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights. In addition, the guide provides examples of how state education agencies can voluntarily help their LEAs with Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) reporting. The guide includes an overview of the CRDC, a discussion of the challenges and opportunities in reporting civil rights data, an explanation of the CRDC reporting process, and case studies that examine how specific education agencies report civil rights data.
2/5/2018
NFES 2017007 The Forum Guide to Collecting and Using Attendance Data
The Forum Guide to Collecting and Using Attendance Data is designed to help state and local education agency staff improve their attendance data practices – the collection, reporting, and use of attendance data to improve student and school outcomes. The guide offers best practice suggestions and features real-life examples of how attendance data have been used by education agencies. The guide includes a set of voluntary attendance codes that can be used to compare attendance data across schools, districts, and states. The guide also features tip sheets for a wide range of education agency staff who work with attendance data.
2/2/2018
NCES 2018139 High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Second Follow-Up: A First Look at Fall 2009 Ninth-Graders in 2016
This publication provides descriptive findings from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) Second Follow-up. HSLS:09 follows a nationally representative sample of students who were ninth-graders in fall 2009 from the beginning of high school into higher education and the workforce. The second follow-up was conducted from March 2016 through January 2017, approximately 3 years after high school graduation for most of the cohort. The data collected allow researchers to examine an array of young-adulthood outcomes among fall 2009 ninth-graders, including delayed high school completion, postsecondary enrollment, early postsecondary persistence and attainment, labor market experiences, family formation, and family financial support.
2/1/2018
NCES 2018466 2015–16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:16): Student Financial Aid Estimates for 2015–16
This First Look publication provides the first results of the 2015–16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:16), the most comprehensive nationally representative survey of student financing of postsecondary education in the United States. The survey was conducted with about 89,000 undergraduate students and 24,000 graduate students attending 1,800 postsecondary institutions in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. This report describes the percentages of students receiving various types of financial aid and average amounts received, by type of institution attended, attendance pattern, dependency status, and income level.
1/30/2018
WWC IRCS687 Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) Promise Academy Charter Schools
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ) Promise Academy Charter Schools is a non-profit organization designed to serve low-income children and families living in Harlem in New York City. The HCZ Promise Academy Charter Schools have a longer school day and year than traditional public schools, monitor student progress on academic outcomes, provide differentiated instruction, and educate students and families on character development, healthy lifestyles, and leadership skills. After reviewing the current research, the WWC found that no eligible studies meet WWC design standards. Therefore, more research is needed to determine the program's impacts on elementary, middle, and high school students.
1/24/2018
WWC IRCS686 Green Dot Public Schools
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on Green Dot Public Schools, a nonprofit organization that operates more than 20 public charter middle and high schools in California, Tennessee, and Washington. The program emphasizes high quality teaching, strong school leadership, a curriculum that prepares students for college, and partnerships with the community. Based on the research, Green Dot Public Schools had potentially positive effects on mathematics achievement, English language arts achievement, student progression, and school attendance for high school students.
1/24/2018
WWC IESS688 Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP)
This What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) report summarizes the research on the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP), a nonprofit network of more than 200 public charter schools educating early childhood, elementary, middle, and high school students. Students, parents, and teachers must sign a commitment to abide by a set of responsibilities, including high behavioral and disciplinary expectations. KIPP schools have an extended school day and an extended school year compared with traditional public schools. Based on the research, the WWC found KIPP to have positive effects on mathematics and English language arts achievement and potentially positive effects on science and social studies achievement for middle and high school students. KIPP shows no discernible effects on student progression for high school students.
1/24/2018
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