WWC review of this study

Enhancing self-reflection and mathematics achievement of at-risk urban technical college students.

Zimmerman, B. J., Moylan, A., Hudesman, J., White, N., & Flugman, B. (2011). Psychological Test and Measurement Modeling, 53(1), 141–160. https://www.gc.cuny.edu/CUNY_GC/media/CUNY-Graduate-Center/PDF/Centers/CASE/enhancing_self_reflection.pdf.

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    199
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: November 2021

At least one finding shows promising evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Academic achievement outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Final exam test score

Self-regulated learning (SRL) instruction vs. Business as usual

0 Semesters

Developmental math course;
137 students

73.18

58.03

Yes

 
 
20
 
Intrapersonal Competencies outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

math exam self-efficacy

Self-regulated learning (SRL) instruction vs. Business as usual

0 Semesters

Developmental math course;
136 students

3.55

3.53

No

--
Progressing in Developmental College Courses outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Computer Adaptive Placement Assessment and Support System (COMPASS) Mathematics Test (% passed)

Self-regulated learning (SRL) instruction vs. Business as usual

0 Semesters

Developmental math course;
199 students

47.00

27.00

Yes

 
 
20
 
More Outcomes

Passed developmental math course

Self-regulated learning (SRL) instruction vs. Business as usual

0 Semesters

Developmental math course;
199 students

50.00

32.00

Yes

 
 
18
 


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 48%
    Male: 52%

  • Urban

Setting

The study was conducted in an urban, public technological college in the United States.

Study sample

The combined study sample for the developmental and introductory college level math course was 52% male and 48% female.

Intervention Group

The intervention consisted of a semester-long (15-week) classroom intervention designed to enhance students' self-reflection through three dimensions: (1) instructor modeling of error correction, (2) guided self-reflection opportunities as part of formative assessment, and (3) incentive system that rewards subsequent attempts at learning.

Comparison Group

The comparison group received business-as-usual instruction in their math course.

Support for implementation

Instructors assigned to the intervention group (self-regulated learning) attended initial meetings before the beginning of the semester, which included information about academic self-regulation, strategic modeling, and a formative assessment process that coupled frequent feedback on problem-solving quizzes with grade-point incentives for in-depth correction of errors on self-reflection forms. Periodic monitoring occurred throughout the semester. Observers used a checklist that focused on strategy instruction and error analysis, specifically whether the instructor made deliberate errors during presentation, encouraged students to demonstrate problem-solving and error detection strategies, and encouraged students to verbalize error detection and problem-solving strategies. Observation results were used during weekly support meetings with the instructors.

Reviewed: November 2016

Meets WWC standards without reservations


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Study sample characteristics were not reported.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Hudesman, J., Crosby, S., Flugman, B., Issac, S., Everson, H., & Clay, D. B. (2013a). Using formative assessment and metacognition to improve student achievement. Journal of Developmental Education, 37(1), 3–13.

 

Your export should download shortly as a zip archive.

This download will include data files for study and findings review data and a data dictionary.

Connect With the WWC

loading
back to top