WWC review of this study

Sustained gains: Year Up’s continued impact on young adults’ earnings

Roder, A., & Elliott, M. (2014). New York: Economic Mobility Corporation

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    143
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: March 2022

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
Industry-recognized credential, certificate, or license completion outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Earned a vocational certificate

Year Up vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
143 students

27.00

25.00

No

--
Medium-Term Earnings outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Average annual earnings

Year Up vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
135 students

19191.00

17257.00

No

--
Medium-Term Employment outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Employed after program completion

Year Up vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
143 students

82.00

80.00

No

--
More Outcomes

Average number of hours worked

Year Up vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
143 students

1373.00

1469.00

No

--
Short-Term Earnings outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Average annual earnings

Year Up vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
129 students

16590.00

10086.00

Yes

 
 
20
 
More Outcomes
Show Supplemental Findings

Average annual earnings

Year Up vs. Business as usual

2 Years

Full sample;
139 students

19955.00

14922.00

Yes

 
 
14

Average annual earnings

Year Up vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample;
128 students

3883.00

11715.00

Yes

-35
 
 
Short-Term Employment outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Employed after program completion

Year Up vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
143 students

75.00

68.00

No

--
More Outcomes

Average number of hours worked

Year Up vs. Business as usual

1 Year

Full sample;
135 students

1202.00

1096.00

No

--
Show Supplemental Findings

Employed after program completion

Year Up vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample;
143 students

73.00

68.00

No

--

Average number of hours worked

Year Up vs. Business as usual

2 Years

Full sample;
143 students

1494.00

1361.00

No

--

Employed after program completion

Year Up vs. Business as usual

2 Years

Full sample;
143 students

83.00

85.00

No

--

Average number of hours worked

Year Up vs. Business as usual

0 Days

Full sample;
135 students

395.00

1251.00

Yes

-38
 
 

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • 16% English language learners

  • Female: 46%
    Male: 54%
  • Race
    Asian
    4%
    Black
    52%
    Not specified
    42%
    White
    2%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic
    34%
    Not Hispanic
    66%

  • Urban
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    Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island

Setting

The study was conducted in three northeastern cities: Boston, New York, and Providence, Rhode Island. The first six months of the program consisted of technical training in classroom settings, while the second six months were on-the-job training in employer partner internship sites.

Study sample

Over half (52%) of the participants were Black, 2% were White, 4% were Asian, 8% were "other," and 34% were unknown/unreported. Over one-third (34%) were Hispanic/Latino and 66% were non-Hispanic/non-Latino. Additionally, 89% had a high school diploma (11% had earned a GED) and 90% had worked for pay prior to participating in Year Up. Just over half (56%) had held their longest job for less than one year. Over half (54%) were male (46% female), and over three-fourths (76%) were between ages 18 and 21. Nearly one-fifth (17%) lived in public housing, and the primary language of 16 percent of participants was not English. Only 10% of participants were not U.S. citizens.

Intervention Group

Year Up participants receive six months of technical skills training geared at meeting the needs of the corporate partners of the program. All participants receive training in operating systems and software for word processing and learn how to use spreadsheets and create presentations. There are separate tracks for information technology, business communications, and financial operations with relevant specialized skills. The program also has college partners so that participants can earn college credits for satisfactory completion of the classes they take. Following the six months of training, participants have six-month internships with corporate partners that are major corporations in the region. Throughout the experience, general professionalism is emphasized, including regular attendance, professional demeanor, timeliness, diligence (completion of work), appropriate attire, networking, and conflict management. Participants also receive a stipend (per a performance contract) and have staff advisors, social workers, peer support opportunities, and are paired with a mentor from outside the program. There is also some flexibility for sites to customize their curriculum based on local considerations.

Comparison Group

Members of the comparison group could engage in other job training programs or postsecondary education opportunities. Individuals randomly assigned to the comparison group were told that they were on a waiting list and could reapply after 10 months. A total of 29 percent of the comparison group members applied to participate in the Year Up intervention during the second and third years following randomization.

Support for implementation

Additional information is not available about the implementation of the Year Up intervention.

In the case of multiple manuscripts that report on one study, the WWC selects one manuscript as the primary citation and lists other manuscripts that describe the study as additional sources.

  • Roder, A., & Elliot, M. (2011). A promising start. Year Up’s initial impacts on low-income young adults’ careers. New York: Economic Mobility Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.buildingbetterprograms.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Year-Up-EMC-Study.pdf

 

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