WWC review of this study

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG 1.0) impact study: Three-year impacts report. OPRE Report 2019-114.

Peck, L.R., Litwok, D., Walton, D., Harvill, E., & Werner, A. (2019). Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from: https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED615554

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
     examining 
    13,716
     Students
    , grade
    PS

Reviewed: November 2021

At least one finding shows strong evidence of effectiveness
At least one statistically significant positive finding
Meets WWC standards without reservations
College Degree Attainment outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Received a degree

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
9,332 students

23.00

23.00

No

--
Earnings outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Average quarterly earnings

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
13,716 students

5039.00

4997.00

No

--
Employment outcomes—Indeterminate effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Employment in either 12th or 13th quarter

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
13,716 students

82.00

81.00

No

--
Industry-recognized credential, certificate, or license outcomes—Statistically significant positive effects found
Outcome
measure
Comparison Period Sample Intervention
mean
Comparison
mean
Significant? Improvement
    index
Evidence
tier

Received a trade license/training certificate

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
9,332 students

21.70

14.00

Yes

 
 
13
 
More Outcomes

Completed diploma or certificate for regular college classes

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
9,332 students

17.70

11.20

Yes

 
 
13
 

Holds a vocational, technical, or professional certificate or license

Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) vs. Business as usual

3 Years

Full sample;
9,332 students

58.10

45.40

Yes

 
 
12
 


Evidence Tier rating based solely on this study. This intervention may achieve a higher tier when combined with the full body of evidence.

Characteristics of study sample as reported by study author.


  • Female: 89%
    Male: 11%

  • Rural, Suburban, Urban
    • B
    • A
    • C
    • D
    • E
    • F
    • G
    • I
    • H
    • J
    • K
    • L
    • P
    • M
    • N
    • O
    • Q
    • R
    • S
    • V
    • U
    • T
    • W
    • X
    • Z
    • Y
    • a
    • h
    • i
    • b
    • d
    • e
    • f
    • c
    • g
    • j
    • k
    • l
    • m
    • n
    • o
    • p
    • q
    • r
    • s
    • t
    • u
    • x
    • w
    • y

    Midwest, Northeast, South, West
  • Race
    Black
    34%
    Other or unknown
    30%
    White
    36%
  • Ethnicity
    Hispanic    
    24%
    Not Hispanic or Latino    
    76%

Setting

The study was implemented at 42 Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) programs operated by 23 HPOG grantees located in 19 states. Grantees included workforce development agencies, postsecondary educational institutions, and nonprofit agencies.

Study sample

The HPOG programs recruited Temporary Assistance for Need Families (TANF) recipients and other individuals with lower income. Approximately 56% were receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)/SNAP for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and 12% were receiving TANF. At baseline, the average age was 32 years old. The majority (89%) of study participants were female and 63% indicated that they had dependent children at home. Demographically, 34% of the study sample were Black/African American, non-Hispanic; 36% were White/Caucasian, non-Hispanic; 7% identified as Other, non-Hispanic. About a quarter (24%) of the study sample were Hispanic/Latino and 26% were currently enrolled in school. Overall, 12% had educational attainment less than 12th grade, 34% had a high school diploma or GED, another 34% had some postsecondary experience, and 19% had a college degree.

Intervention Group

HPOG programs offered career pathways programs that targeted skills and competencies in demand by the local healthcare industry. The career pathways programs resulted in employer- or industry-recognized, portable education credentials such as certificates, degrees, professional certifications, and licenses. In addition to providing training course offerings for various healthcare occupations, as part of the intervention, HPOG programs also provided participants financial assistance and support services, including tutoring, assistance with childcare and transportation costs, and employment assistance. Students in the intervention condition were exposed to various educational and occupational supports and training specific to the healthcare field. Local implementation varied across sites.

Comparison Group

Individuals in the comparison group were not able to access the HPOG program supports. The comparison group received business-as-usual supports and services from workforce development agencies, postsecondary educational institutions, and nonprofit agencies in their local communities.

Support for implementation

No additional information provided.

 

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